C.D. Motagua

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Motagua
C.D. Motagua badge.png
Full name Club Deportivo Motagua
Nickname(s) Ciclón Azul (Blue Cyclone)
Aguilas (Eagles)
Azul Profundo (Deep Blue)
Los Mimados (The Loved Ones)
Founded 29 August 1928; 87 years ago (1928-08-29)
Ground Estadio Tiburcio Carías Andino
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Ground Capacity 35,000
Chairman Eduardo Atala
Coach Diego Vásquez
League Liga Nacional
2015–16 Semifinalist
Current season

Club Deportivo Motagua (Spanish pronunciation: [moˈtaɣwa]) is an association football club, located in Tegucigalpa, capital of Honduras.

CD Motagua was founded on 29 August 1928 and competes in the Honduran top division playing its home games at the Estadio Nacional. The club is one of the most successful and renowned ones in Honduras.

History[edit]

Foundation[edit]

The club was founded on 29 August 1928 as the idea of Marco Antonio Ponce and supported by Marco Antonio Rosa at a meeting held in the house of Mrs. Marta Vélez de Ramos; located next to the Bank of London and Montreal, taking advantage of the disintegrated clubs América, Honduras Atlética and Águila. That day, they decided to call all members of these clubs to form Motagua. In the same meeting the Board of directors headed by Marco Antonio Rose and the doctor Alejandro Lara followed by another group of personalities were elected. This board of directors supported the female basketball, baseball and athletics teams.

First game[edit]

The first game was against Tejeros del España of the Guanacaste neighborhood, held on 25 November 1928 in the football field La Isla.[1] The final result was 1–1. The referee of the encounter was Herasmo Velásquez and the Motagua team captain was Constantine Gálvez "Tatino". The team was managed by Daniel Bustillo.

First International game: On 9 April 1939 against Costa Rican side Orión at the San Felipe field in Tegucigalpa; Motagua were managed by Honduran coach Lurio Martínez and won the match 3–0 with three goals from "Gorgojo" Ramos.[2] Lurio Martinez's favored player, Julio Valladares, was injured and was out 3 games. Valladares scored a total of 40 goals for the team.

Club history[edit]

The "blues", were founded on 29 August 1928 as an idea of the poet Marco Antonio Ponce and supported by Marco Antonio Rosa, and is a fusion of the disintegrated teams America, Honduras, Atlético and Aguila; and being inspired by the Motagua River which in those days was being disputed between Guatemala and Honduras, thus gave rise to its name, and is nowadays one of the teams with most achievements, popular and oldest of Honduras.

The metropolitan club is one of the best in Honduras and Central America and has already accumulated several championships, being also a well-known competitor in international tournaments like the CONCACAF Champions League, where it has participated in many occasions but still has not been able to reach a final; In 1986 it had its best finish getting the fifth place.

The team debuted professionally in the 1965–66 season, it was on 18 July in La Ceiba against Vida, where they won 1–0. Three years later they got their first professional championship under the management of coach Rodolfo Godoy. This year Motagua also won the first ever Honduran Cup, winning the double that season.

The so-called "Mimados" repeated in 1970–71 and 1973–74, these being one of the best times of the club. Unfortunately in 1972–73 the championship was declared null, depriving Motagua to get another title that was almost conquered.

After having achieved the regular season in 1978–79, Motagua qualified to the final stage falling behind Real España and being forced to play the finals series where they raise their fourth cup.

When the Honduras qualified to the World Cup Finals in 1982 for the first time in its history, most of the players came from Motagua and Real España, a total of five Motagua players attended to the World Cup. Also worth mentioning that the first goal for Honduras in the mentioned cup was converted by one of these players, Héctor Zelaya against the host Spain in that remembered 1–1 draw.

They spent 13 long years until the 1991–92 season to lift another trophy in one of the most special moments in Motagua's history breaking the drought of wins. In 1993, 1995, 1997 and 1998 obtained four second places in the discontinued Honduran Cup.

In 1997–98 the league brought the innovative Apertura and Clausura system, and Motagua was able to achieve both titles, being this the first time to get two leagues in a row, only two years later successfully achieved the 1999–00 Apertura and Clausura. In January 1999, they won the 1997–98 Honduran Super Cup against Platense.

In 2000 again Motagua contribute to the National team offering 6 players to the Olympic National team, and Honduras achieves for the first time the right to compete at the 2000 Summer Olympics.

The last two league titles came in the 2006–07 Apertura and 2010–11 Clausura season after defeating neighbors Olimpia twice.[3] On December 2007, they won their first international competition at the 2007 Copa Interclubes UNCAF, winning it undefeated.

In their football record, Motagua was crowned in 17 opportunities, this number includes amateur and professional tournaments, and is one of the clubs that has given more glory to Honduran football by forming players of high level contributing to the different National teams, as well as in foreign clubs.

The club[edit]

Colours and badges[edit]

Home: 1928–present
Home: 1984
Home: 1988
Away: 2003
Away: 2007–09
Away: 2010–11
Away: 2011–12
Alternative: 2011–13
Away: 2013–14
Away: 2014–15
Away: 2015–16
Alternative: 2014–16


Motagua90x90.png
Motagua120x81.png
C.D. Motagua badge since 2010.png
CD Motagua logo 2013.png
1980's–2016 1990's 2010–13 2013–14

Motagua's traditional colour is dark blue representing the blue waters of the Motagua River. This is because that at the time the club was founded, the Motagua River was in dispute between Honduras and Guatemala. Since 2011, Motagua plays all their games in pink jerseys for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month during the month of October.

The Motagua badge has a blue eagle. This is because one of the desitengrated club that united to become Motagua was named CD Águila, which means to Eagle.

Stadium[edit]

Motagua plays their home matches at Estadio Tiburcio Carías Andino in Tegucigalpa. The stadium is named after the Honduran president Tiburcio Carías. The stadium is divided into Sol Norte, Sol Sur, Sol Centro, Preferencia, Silla and Palco. The Motaguan supporters "La Revo" are located at Sol Norte and the "Macro Azurra" sits in Sol Centro.

Traditions[edit]

There are some traditions within the Motagua institution.

Debuting players– When a new player debuts, he must shave his head. This is optional, most of the players that do shave are recently promoted from the reserve team or are young of age.

New Signings– Usually on the first day of training new players are surrounded by their teammates and are kicked.

Supporters[edit]

Motagua has many supporters throughout Honduras. Motagua has one Barra Brava and three other supporters' groups. The barra brava is "Los Revolucionarios del Motagua 1928", who call themselves "La Revo". This fan group has "bandas" or smaller groups inside La Revo such as (from Tegucigalpa) "Los Fuser", "Los Dementes", "Escuadron 57", "Comando 21", "Los Poltershe", "Irreverentes", "Capone", "Infernales", "Danger's", "Anarkia", etc. (from Comayagua) "C26", (from San Pedro Sula) "Los Del Norte", (from La Ceiba) "Revo Ceiba", (from Choluteca) "Revo Choluteca", (from El Progreso) "Revo Progreso", (from Siguatepeque) "Revo Sigua". All of the "bandas" hang "mantas" or huge pieces of cloth saying their banda's name inside the stadium. They also hang one with the barra's website and many of Che Guevara. Matches from Motagua against Olimpia it's illegal to hang these mantas because some of the members go to steal them and cause great scandal so police prefer banning this. La Revo don't cause many scandals between other barras bravas in Honduras only with Olimpia's Ultra Fiel. Throughout 2006–07 La Revo had problems with Marathon's Furia Verde but they came to peace under the same belief in all of Honduras. "Por Una Honduras Libre De Chucos" which translates to "For a Honduras free of Dirtbags" (Chucos being Olimpia). Marathon, Real España and Motagua's barra bravas all have a manta with this phrase.

Another of the biggest fan group is named "Macro Azurra" which is supported by the club. They can be easily be spotted in the stadium because they generally always have blue ballons. This group is bigger in the northern territory and is sponsored by the club and by Fed-Ex.

There are also two smaller groups one being "Fortaleza Azul" and "JAH" which stands for "Justicia Amor y Humildad" which means "Justice Love and Humbleness". JAH is a religious based fan group which was founded by seven members of the Jehová es Nuestro Pastor church. JAH say that their trips are paid by God.

Sponsorship[edit]

Period Kit manufacturer Main shirt sponsor
1928–86 unknown none
1987–89 Pepsi
1990–92 Castillo Galo
1993 Esso Super Oil
1994–95 Banco Ficohsa
1996 Umbro
1997–98 ABA Sport Pepsi
1999–00 Joma
2001 Imperial
2002–present Pepsi

Club Rivalries[edit]

Honduran Superclásico[edit]

El Clasico Capitalino (The Capital's Classic) is played between Olimpia and CD Motagua. Their matches are also known as El Clasico Local (The Local Classic) in Tegucigalpa. There is a huge rivalry between the clubs and their fans; (La Ultra Fiel [of Olimpia] and La Revo [of Motagua]).

Clásico de las M's[edit]

Main article: Clasico de las M's

El Clásico de las M's (The Classic of the M's) or El Derbi de las M's (The "M" Derby), is a derby football match played between Motagua from Tegucigalpa and Marathón from San Pedro Sula, two of the most successful and popular football teams in Honduras.

Motagua–Real España football rivalry[edit]

The Motagua–Real España classic is not as fierce as the other two already mentioned as these both teams have a good relationship with each other from the players, to the board and the fans; however they had played six intense league finals, three won by each side.

Short Lived[edit]

One smaller rivalry, which might be called extinct, was against Universidad (also known as UNAH). The club named Universidad, represented the Honduran National Autonomous University in Tegucigalpa, and therefore shared the city with Motagua. This inspired a local derby until UNAH was relocated to Choluteca. UNAH in various occasions left Motagua out of the play-offs, intensifying the rivalry. This derby can now be called extinct since Universidad were relegated to the Liga de Ascenso. The club was eventually sold to, and renamed, Universidad Pedagogica Nacional-Francisco Morázan (also known as UPN-FM) (National Pedagogical University-Francisco Morázan).

Achievements[edit]

Motagua is the second most successful club in Honduras having won 13 domestic leagues since the inauguration of the Honduran Liga Nacional in 1965–66.[4]

Domestic

1968–69, 1970–71, 1973–74, 1978–79, 1991–92, 1997–98 A, 1997–98 C, 1999–00 A, 1999–00 C, 2001–02 A, 2006–07 A, 2010–11 C, 2014–15 A
Runners-up (11): 1969–70, 1974–75, 1976–77, 1982–83, 1990–91, 1993–94, 2002–03 C, 2007–08 A, 2009–10 C, 2014–15 C, 2015–16 A
1968
Runners-up (4): 1993, 1995, 1997, 1998
1999
1949–50
Runners-up (2): 1947–48, 1950–51

International

2007
Third Place (1): 2002

League and cups performance[edit]

Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1965–66 9th 3–4–11 (11:26) No play-offs Not held Didn't enter
1966–67 9th 5–3–10 (24:31)
1967–68 6th 6–5–7 (22:21) Not held Didn't enter
1968–69 Winners 17–5–5 (45:23) Winners Not held
1969–70 Runner-up 13–9–5 (38:26) Not held First round Didn't enter
1960s record 44–26–38 (140:127) 0–0–0 (0:0)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1970–71 1st 13–11–3 (43:18) Winners 0–1–0 (1:1) Not held Didn't enter
1971–72 3rd 14–5–8 (37:23) No play-offs Not held Didn't enter First round Didn't enter
1972–73 1st 6–3–0 (18:7) 4th Not held Didn't enter
1973–74 Winners 13–13–1 (39:15) Not held
1974–75 1st 18–15–3 (44:19) Finalist 0–2–2 (1:3) Didn't enter Second round Didn't enter
1975–76 2nd 9–14–4 (27:18) Final 4 round 2–4–1 (5:4) Didn't enter
1976–77 2nd 13–9–5 (27:12) Finalist 4–2–2 (10:10) Didn't enter Second round Didn't enter
1977–78 4th 11–8–8 (27:21) Final 5 round 3–4–1 (11:9) Didn't enter
1978–79 1st 13–12–2 (34:15) Winners 6–1–3 (17:9)
1979–80 5th 9–9–9 (29:29) Play-off loss 0–0–1 (1:2) Group stage Didn't enter
1970s record 113–96–43 (307:170) 15–14–10 (46:38)
All-time record 157–122–81 (447:297) 15–14–10 (46:38)
Combined record 172–136–91 (493:335)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1980–81 6th 6–15–6 (32:31) Didn't enter Not held Didn't enter
1981–82 2nd 15–8–7 (35:25) Final 5 round 4–3–2 (14:8)
1982–83 2nd 9–13–5 (31:28) Final 5 round 2–5–1 (13:7)
1983–84 6th 14–8–14 (36:36) No play-offs Didn't enter First round Didn't enter
1984–85 5th 11–13–12 (30:33) Didn't enter Didn't enter
1985–86 2nd B 5–9–4 (12:17) Final 4 round 2–2–2 (6:6) Not held Didn't enter
1986–87 3rd B 8–12–7 (27:26) Play-off loss 0–0–1 (3:5) Intermediate round Didn't enter
1987–88 3rd B 9–8–10 (32:37) Didn't enter Didn't enter
1988–89 2nd B 10–12–5 (26:18) Final 5 round 2–4–2 (4:6)
1989–90 2nd B 9–10–8 (29:23) Final 5 round 2–3–3 (5:8)
1980s record 96–108–78 (290:274) 12–17–11 (45:40)
All-time record 253–230–159 (737:571) 27–31–21 (91:78)
Combined record 280–261–180 (828:649)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1990–91 5th 6–14–7 (26:23) Finalist 5–4–2 (8:5) Not held Didn't enter
1991–92 1st 16–5–6 (38:19) Winners 1–3–6 (4:14) First round Didn't enter
1992–93 5th 10–10–7 (41:34) Final 5 round 2–3–3 (10:13) Group stage Not held Second round
1993–94 4th 7–12–8 (28:27) Final 3 round 2–3–1 (5:4) Finalist Second round
1994–95 2nd 15–9–3 (42:21) Final 6 round 0–0–2 (2:6) Semi-finalist Didn't enter
1995–96 3rd 11–7–9 (36:28) Final 3 round 3–0–3 (8:8) 2nd Not held withdrew First round Didn't enter
1996–97 4th 11–9–7 (37:25) Final 6 round 0–1–1 (3:4) 4th Group stage Didn't enter
1997–98 A 2nd 10–7–3 (23:17) Winners 3–2–1 (8:4) 2nd Didn't enter Group stage
1997–98 C 2nd 14–4–2 (39:15) Winners 3–3–0 (11:6)
1998–99 2nd 7–7–4 (24:20) Semi-finalist 2–0–2 (5:7) 2nd Winners Group stage
1999–2000 A 1st 10–7–1 (39:16) Winners 2–4–0 (6:3) Not held Didn't enter
1999–2000 C 3rd 9–7–2 (26:17) Winners 2–4–0 (8:6)
1990s record 126–98–59 (399:259) 25–27–21 (78:80)
All-time record 379–328–218 (1136:830) 52–58–42 (169:158)
Combined record 431–386–260 (1305:988)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
2000–01 A 2nd 7–8–3 (20:15) Final 6 round 0–1–1 (2:3) Not held Group stage Didn't enter
2000–01 C 7th 2–12–4 (23:27) Final 6 round 0–1–1 (2:3)
2001–02 A 1st 8–8–2 (22:13) Winners 2–0–2 (7:6) Didn't enter
2001–02 C 8th 4–7–7 (12:16) Didn't enter
2002–03 A 5th 7–5–6 (24:23) 3rd First round Didn't enter
2002–03 C 4th 8–4–6 (21:16) Finalist 1–1–2 (5:6)
2003–04 A 5th 7–3–8 (22:22) Didn't enter Didn't enter
2003–04 C 5th 6–5–5 (22:20)
2004–05 A 9th 4–6–8 (20:25)
2004–05 C 5th 4–11–3 (18:18)
2005–06 A 10th 3–5–10 (16:26)
2005–06 C 4th 8–5–5 (24:20) Semi-finalist 1–0–1 (3:3)
2006–07 A 2nd 9–4–5 (27:22) Winners 2–1–1 (10:4)
2006–07 C 4th 10–1–7 (31:26) Semi-finalist 0–0–1 (1:4)
2007–08 A 2nd 9–5–4 (28:19) Finalist 1–2–1 (3:3) Winners Quarter-finalist Didn't enter
2007–08 C 4th 8–3–7 (23:19) Semi-finalist 0–0–1 (2:7)
2008–09 A 3rd 9–3–6 (24:21) Semi-finalist 1–0–1 (1:1) Not held Didn't enter First round
2008–09 C 8th 4–7–7 (13:21) Didn't enter
2009–10 A 2nd 10–5–3 (31:14) Semi-finalist 1–0–1 (1:2) Didn't enter
2009–10 C 1st 11–3–4 (28:15) Finalist 1–2–1 (4:5)
2000s record 138–110–110 (449:398) 10–8–14 (41:49)
All-time record 517–438–328 (1585:1228) 62–66–56 (210:207)
Combined record 579–504–384 (1795:1435)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
2010–11 A 7th 5–6–7 (21:25) Didn't enter Not held Preliminary round Didn't enter
2010–11 C 2nd 8–7–3 (25:17) Winners 2–1–1 (8:6)
2011–12 A 7th 6–4–8 (20:19) Didn't enter Group stage
2011–12 C 2nd 7–11–0 (22:10) Semi-finalist 0–1–1 (0:2)
2012–13 A 3rd 6–8–4 (21:15) Semi-finalist 2–2–0 (10:6) Didn't enter
2012–13 C 7th 6–4–8 (27:23) Didn't enter
2013–14 A 9th 5–6–7 (25:27)
2013–14 C 4th 8–5–5 (20:16) Play-off loss 0–1–1 (1:2)
2014–15 A 3rd 8–4–6 (30:25) Winners 4–2–0 (8:4) 3rd Not held
2014–15 C 2nd 11–4–3 (37:21) Finalist 1–1–2 (4:3)
2015–16 A 2nd 9–5–4 (41:25) Finalist 0–4–0 (6:6) Quarter-finalist abandoned Not held Group stage Didn't enter
2015–16 C 4th 9–3–6 (28:22) Semi-finalist 1–1–2 (3:3)
2016–17 A TBD 0–0–0 (0:0) TBD TBD Didn't enter Didn't enter
2016–17 C TBD 0–0–0 (0:0) TBD
2010s record 88–67–61 (317:245) 10–13–7 (40:32)
All-time record 605–505–389 (1902:1473) 72–79–63 (250:239)
Combined record 677–584–452 (2152:1712)

All time top scorers[edit]

  • As of 2015–16 Apertura
No. Player Goals
1 Honduras Ángel Obando 77
2 Honduras Amado Guevara 70[5]
3 Honduras Óscar Hernández 68
4 Honduras Luis Reyes 54
5 Honduras Jairo Martínez 50
6 Honduras Mario Artica 46
7 Honduras Edwin Castro 40
8 Honduras Georgie Welcome 39
9 Chile Mario Juvini 38
10 Honduras Carlos Discua 38

Records[edit]

  • As of 2015–16 Apertura
  • Click show for more details

Performance at Copa Interclubes UNCAF[edit]

Season Pos P W D L F A PTS +/–
1999 8th of 11 7 1 4 2 4 6 7  –2
2000 Didn't enter
2001 7th of 8 3 0 1 2 1 3 1  –2
2002 3rd of 12 6 3 1 2 10 11 10  –1
2003 Didn't enter
2004 Didn't enter
2005 Didn't enter
2006 Didn't enter
2007 1st of 16 8 7 1 0 15 5 22 +10
2008– discontinued
Totals 5th of 48 24 11 7 6 30 25 40 +5

All-time record vs. opponents[edit]

Domestic level[edit]

International level[edit]

  • As of 20 October 2015
Opponent First meeting Last Meeting Pld W D L GF GA GD
Costa Rica Alajuelense April 25, 1992 Sept 29, 2011 6 0 1 5 5 16 −11
El Salvador Alianza 1979 April 3, 1997 4 0 3 1 5 6 −1
Mexico América Aug 5, 2015 Oct 20, 2015 2 0 1 1 1 5 −4
Panama Árabe Unido Dec 18, 2002 Dec 18, 2002 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1
Argentina Arsenal Aug 19, 2008 Sept 4, 2008 2 0 0 2 1 6 −5
El Salvador Atlético Marte May 4, 1986 May 18, 1986 2 1 0 1 4 2 +2
Guatemala Aurora 1979 Nov 20, 1997 3 0 1 2 3 6 −3
Costa Rica Cartaginés May 5, 1974 May 19, 1974 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3
Guatemala Comunicaciones July 27, 1986 Dec 20, 2002 16 3 10 3 15 17 −2
Belize Juventus June 26, 1993 July 18, 1999 4 2 2 0 9 2 +7
United States LA Galaxy March 16, 2003 Oct 20, 2011 4 0 1 3 2 6 −4
El Salvador Luis Ángel Firpo Feb 24, 1999 July 25, 1999 2 1 0 1 2 2 0
Honduras Marathón Nov 1, 2002 Nov 1, 2002 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
Mexico Morelia Aug 25, 2011 Sept 22, 2011 2 0 0 2 0 6 −6
Guatemala Municipal June 21, 1974 Aug 4, 2011 10 4 2 4 11 11 0
United States NY Pancyprian-Freedoms April 10, 1983 April 26, 1983 2 1 0 1 3 4 −1
Honduras Olimpia 1979 1979 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1
Mexico Pachuca March 11, 2008 March 19, 2008 2 0 1 1 0 1 −1
Bermuda Pembroke Hamilton Aug 31, 1986 Sept 6, 1986 2 1 0 1 3 5 −2
Honduras Real España Nov 29, 1997 Nov 29, 1997 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Nicaragua Real Estelí Aug 7, 2007 Aug 16, 2007 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4
Panama San Francisco Sept 18, 2007 Sept 26, 2007 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2
El Salvador Santiagueño 1979 1979 2 0 0 2 2 6 −4
Costa Rica Saprissa April 25, 1969 Dec 5, 2007 15 1 5 9 7 24 −17
Panama Tauro Aug 17, 2001 Oct 23, 2002 2 1 0 1 2 2 0
Canada Toronto July 27, 2010 Aug 3, 2010 2 0 1 1 2 3 −1
Nicaragua Walter Ferretti Aug 27, 2015 Sept 24, 2015 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3
Totals 96 25 30 41 96 132  –36
  • Friendly matches not included.
  • Games decided by penalty shootout are counted as ties.

Current season[edit]

Squad[edit]

First-team squad[edit]

As of 2016

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Argentina GK Sebastián Portigliatti
2 Honduras DF Juan Pablo Montes
3 Honduras DF Henry Figueroa
4 Honduras DF Júnior Izaguirre
5 Honduras DF Marcelo Pereira
7 Honduras MF Erick Andino
8 Honduras DF Orlin Peralta
10 Brazil FW Israel Silva
11 Argentina FW Lucas Gómez
12 Honduras DF José Fiallos
12 Honduras MF Reinieri Mayorquín
14 Honduras MF Irvin Reyna
15 Honduras DF Maylor Núñez
16 Honduras MF Héctor Castellanos
No. Position Player
17 Honduras MF Denil Maldonado
18 Honduras DF Wilmer Crisanto
21 Honduras FW Foslyn Grant
22 Argentina MF Santiago Vergara
23 Honduras MF Néstor Martínez
24 Honduras DF Omar Elvir
25 Honduras GK Marlon Licona
26 Honduras MF Henry Güity
27 Honduras MF Félix Crisanto
28 Honduras MF Joshua Nieto
29 Honduras FW Keller Andino
32 Honduras MF Everson López
33 Honduras GK Cristian Hernández
34 Honduras FW Kevin López

Current technical staff[edit]

Executive President Honduras Eduardo Atala
Financial President Honduras Juan Carlos Suazo
Director of Football Honduras Marvin Fonseca
Public Relations and Social Media Manager Honduras Walter Araujo
Commercial and Marketing Manager Honduras Luis Brevé
Administration and Finances Manager Honduras Fabián Ordoñez

Retired numbers[edit]

16 – Honduras Edy Vásquez, retired for 2 years (2007–09) in memorian of Edy Vásquez's death.

20 – Honduras Amado Guevara, retired.

Former presidents[edit]

  • Marco Antonio Rosa
  • Edgardo Zúniga
  • Manuel Cáceres
  • Celestino Cáceres
  • Gonzalo Carías
  • César Romero
  • Antonio Urquía
  • Juda Guzmán
  • Silverio Henríquez
  • Lurio Martínez
  • Carlos Arriaga
  • Carlos Amador
  • Carlos Cruz
  • Mario Rivera López
  • Joaquín González
  • Octasiano Valerio
  • Horacio Fortín
  • Saturnino Vidaurreta
  • Heriberto Gómez
  • Tulio Bueso
  • Fausto Flores
  • Gustavo Adolfo Alvarado
  • Pedro Atala Simón
  • Salvador Lamas
  • Juan Ángel Arias
  • Cristóbal Simón
  • Francisco Zepeda
  • Leónidas Rosa Bautista
  • Jorge Abudoj
  • Eduardo Atala
  • Marco Tulio Gutiérrez
  • Javier Atala
  • Pedro Atala
  • Julio Gutiérrez (current)

Former managers[edit]

Notable former players[edit]

  • Ramón Maradiaga
  • Gilberto Yearwood
  • Roberto Abruzzeze
  • Hector Zelaya
  • Antonio Obando
  • Amado Guevara
  • Mario Hernan Yuvini Carreño
  • Roger Mayorga
  • Lenard Welch
  • Noel Valladares
  • Mariano Godoy
  • Oscar Hernandez
  • Reinaldo Clavasquin
  • Emilio Izaguirre

See also Category:Motagua players

References[edit]

External links[edit]