C. Christine Fair

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Carol Christine Fair (born 1968) is an associate professor at the Center for Peace and Security Studies (CPASS), within Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Academic and professional[edit]

Fair is employed at the Security Studies Program (SSP) within Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.[1][2]

Prior to this, Fair served as a senior political scientist with the RAND Corporation, political officer with the UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan and as a senior research associate with the United States Institute of Peace. She specializes in political and military affairs in South Asia.[3]

Views[edit]

Fair has published several articles defending the use of drone strikes in Pakistan and has been critical of analyses by Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and other humanitarian organizations.[4]

Criticism[edit]

Fair's work and viewpoints have been the subject of prominent criticism.[5] Her pro-drone stance has been denounced, and called "surprisingly weak" by Brookings Institution senior fellow Shadi Hamid.[5] Journalist Glenn Greenwald dismissed Fair's arguments as "rank propaganda", arguing there is "mountains of evidence" showing drones are counterproductive, pointing to mass civilian casualties and independent studies.[6] In 2010, Fair denied the notion that drones caused any civilian deaths, alleging Pakistani media reports were responsible for creating this perception.[7] Jeremy Scahill wrote that Fair's statement was "simply false" and contradicted by New America's detailed study on drone casualties.[7] Fair later said that casualties are caused by the UAVs, but maintains they are the most effective tool for fighting terrorism.[8]

Writing for The Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf challenged Fair's co-authored narrative that the U.S. could legitimize support in Pakistan for its drone program using 'education' and 'public diplomacy'; he called it an "example of interventionist hubris and naivete" built upon flawed interpretation of public opinion data.[9] An article in the Middle East Research and Information Project called the work "some of the most propagandistic writing in support of President Barack Obama’s targeted kill lists to date."[10] It censured the view that Pakistanis needed to be informed by the U.S. what is "good for them" as fraught with imperialist condescension; or the assumption that the Urdu press was less informed than the English press – because the latter was sometimes less critical of the U.S.[10]

Fair's journalistic sources have been questioned for their credibility[11] and she has been accused of having a conflict of interest due to her past work with U.S. government think tanks, as well the CIA.[5] In 2011 and 2012, she received funding from the U.S. embassy in Islamabad to conduct a survey on public opinion concerning militancy. However, Fair states most of the grants went to a survey firm and that it had no influence on her research.[5] Pakistani media analysts have dismissed Fair's views as hawkish rhetoric, riddled with factual inaccuracies, lack of objectivity, and being selectively biased.[11][12][13][14] She has also been rebuked for comments on social media perceived as provocative, such as suggesting burning down Pakistan's embassy in Afghanistan or asking India to "squash Pakistan militarily, diplomatically, politically and economically." She has been accused of double standards, partisanship towards India, and has been criticized for her contacts with dissident leaders from Balochistan, a link which they claim "raises serious questions if her interest in Pakistan is merely academic."[13]

Controversies[edit]

Fair has been accused of harassment of former colleague Asra Nomani, after Nomani wrote a column in The Washington Post[15] explaining why she voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 United States Presidential Election. The harassment came in the form of Tweets taking aim at Nomani with a series of emotionally charged profanity and insults that lasted 31 consecutive days.[16]

Works[edit]

Books
Edited collections
Research reports
  • Limited Conflicts Under the Nuclear Umbrella: Indian and Pakistani Lessons from the Kargil Crisis (with Ashley J. Tellis and Jamison Jo Medby, RAND, 2002). ISBN 978-0-8330-3229-4.
  • The Counterterror Coalitions: Cooperation with Pakistan and India (RAND, 2004). ISBN 978-0-8330-3559-2.
  • Urban Battle Fields of South Asia: Lessons Learned from Sri Lanka, India, and Pakistan (RAND, 2005). ISBN 978-0-8330-4058-9.
  • Fortifying Pakistan: The Role of U.S. Internal Security Assistance (with Peter Chalk, US Institute of Peace Press, 2006). ISBN 978-1-929223-88-6.[20][21]
  • The Madrassah Challenge: Militancy and Religious Education in Pakistan (US Institute of Peace Press, 2008). ISBN 978-1-60127-028-3.[22]
  • Counterinsurgency in Pakistan (with Seth G. Jones, RAND 2010). ISBN 978-0-8330-4976-6.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "C. Christine Fair". Georgetown University academic directory. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  2. ^ C. Christine, Fair (25 September 2009). "For Now, Drones Are the Best Option". New York Times. Retrieved 28 June 2016. 
  3. ^ Author information, Oxford University Press, retrieved 6 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Ethical and methodological issues in assessing drones' civilian impacts in Pakistan". Washington Post. 2014-10-06. Retrieved 2015-10-16. 
  5. ^ a b c d Norton, Ben (4 November 2015). "Not playing fair: How Christine Fair, defender of U.S. drone program in Pakistan, twists the facts — and may have conflicts of her own". Salon. Retrieved 4 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "Do drone strikes create more terrorists than they kill?". Al Jazeera. 23 October 2015. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Scahill, Jeremy (10 May 2010). "Georgetown Professor: 'Drones Are Not Killing Innocent Civilians' in Pakistan". The Nation. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  8. ^ Shane, Scott (11 August 2011). "C.I.A. Is Disputed on Civilian Toll in Drone Strikes". New York Times. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  9. ^ Friedersdorf, Conor (24 January 2013). "Yes, Pakistanis Really Do Hate America's Killer Drones". The Atlantic. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Waheed, Sarah (25 January 2013). "Drones, US Propaganda and Imperial Hubris". Middle East Research and Information Project. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  11. ^ a b Ahmad, Muhammad Idrees (14 June 2011). "The magical realism of body counts". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  12. ^ Haider, Murtaza (27 June 2012). "An unFair comment". Dawn. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  13. ^ a b "US professor's anti-Pak agenda?". The News. 7 February 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016. 
  14. ^ Chandio, Khalid (6 May 2015). Prejudice Dominates Christine Discourse. Islamabad Policy Research Institute. 
  15. ^ Nomani, Asra (10 November 2016). "I'm a Muslim, a woman and an immigrant. I voted for Trump.". Washington Post. 
  16. ^ Frates, Katie (27 December 2016). "'F**K YOU. GO TO HELL': Georgetown Prof Loses It On Muslim Trump Voter". Daily Caller. 
  17. ^ Adeney, Katherine (2015), "Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War by C. Christine Fair (Book Review)", Political Studies Review, 13: 623–624 
  18. ^ Shaikh, Farzana (2015), "Fighting to the end: the Pakistan army's way of war, by C. Christine Fair (Book review)", International Affairs, 91 (3): 665–667 
  19. ^ Ghorpade, Yashodhan (2014), "C. Christine Fair and Shaun Gregory (Eds). Pakistan in National and Regional Change: State and Society in Flux (Book Review)", Journal of South Asian Development, 9 (1): 91–97, doi:10.1177/0973174113520586 
  20. ^ Argon, Kemal (September 2008), "Reviewed Work: Fortifying Pakistan: The Role of U.S. Internal Security Assistance by C. Christine Fair, Peter Chalk", International Journal on World Peace, 25 (3): 120–123, JSTOR 20752852 
  21. ^ Rizvi, Hasan-Askari (September 2008), "Fortifying Pakistan: The Role of U.S. Internal Security Assistance, by C. Christine Fair and Peter Chalk (eds) (BOok review)", Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 16 (3): 169–170, doi:10.1111/j.1468-5973.2008.00546.x 
  22. ^ Schaffer, Teresita C. (October 2008), "Book Reviews: South Asia", Survival, 50 (5): 195–215, doi:10.1080/00396330802456536 

External links[edit]