C. H. B. Quennell

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Charles Henry Bourne Quennell (1872–1935), was an English architect, designer, illustrator and writer.

Biography[edit]

Quennell was the son of Henry Quennell, a builder, and his wife Emma Rebecca (née Hobbs),[1] and grew up in a house at Cowley Road on the Holland Town Estate, Kennington, London. He was the husband of Marjorie Quennell whom he met in 1903 at the Junior Art Worker's Guild and father of Peter Quennell. With his wife, he wrote extensively on social history.

Discussing the leading English furniture designs of the time, Herman Muthesius[2] wrote: '... that inspired artist Henry Wilson and the excellent designer C. H. B. Quennell far outshine the rest of the group and produce work of high artistic sensibility.'

Quennell died in December 1935; his final words to his wife were "There you go – butting in as usual" [3]

His brother, Walter, a builder and property developer, was father of Joan Quennell, a Conservative M.P.[4][5][6]

Career[edit]

He was articled to Newman and Newman, and worked in the offices of J. McK. Brydon and of J. D. Sedding and Henry Wilson. He obtained the National Gold medal for Architecture, and RIBA Medal of Merit and £5 in the Soane Medallion competition in 1895.[7] He began practice in 1896 working with his brother William developing houses at Hampstead Garden Suburb and then with developer George Washington Hart.[8]

Illustrations and designs[edit]

Positions[edit]

1912–15 Member of the Council of RIBA 1914–25 Member of the Town Planning Committee of RIBA 1928–30 Member of the Board of Architectural Education

Writing[edit]

  • 1906 Modern Suburban Houses, Batsford, London, 1906
  • 1906 A Guide to Norwich Cathedral, (Bell's Cathedral Series), 1906.
  • 1910 "Symposium on Town Planning"[13]
  • 1911 "The House and its Equipment", Country Life (various articles)
  • 1919 "Standard types of Standardised Methods?",[14]
  • 1919 "Berkhamsted War Memorial Town Improvement Scheme"[15]
  • 1921 "How to revive public confidence in building"[16]
Works in collaboration
  • Marjorie & C. H. B. Quennell, A History of Everyday Things in England, London, B. T. Batsford Ltd, 1918–1934
    • Volume I 1066–1449
    • Volume II 1500–1799
    • Volume III 1733–1851
    • Volume IV 1852–1914
  • Marjorie & C. H. B. Quennell, A History of Everyday life in.., London, B. T. Batsford Ltd, 1921–1926.
    • Everyday life in Anglo-Saxon, Viking, and Norman times
    • Everyday Life in Roman Britain
    • Everyday Life in Prehistoric Times (vol. 1 The Old Stone Age, vol. 2 The New Stone Age)
  • Marjorie & C. H. B. Quennell, Everyday things in Greece, London, B. T. Batsford Ltd, 1929–1932.
    • Vol 1, Homeric Greece
    • Vol 2, Archaic Greece
    • Vol 3, Classical Greece
  • Marjorie & C. H. B. Quennell, The Good New Days, London, B. T. Batsford Ltd., 1935.
  • C. H. B. & P. Quennell Somerset. (Shell Guide.) London: Architectural Press, 1938

Works[edit]

  • 1899 The Chapel, Cambridge House[17]
  • 1899 Design for Liskeard Church[18]
  • 1904 Gallops Homestead, Sussex[19]
  • 1904 Campbell Mausoleum, St Mary's Cemetery, Harrow Road, Hammersmith, London
  • 1905 Vale Cottage and Burnt Oak Cottage, Bickley [20]
  • 1905 Four Beeches, 3 Denbridge Road, Bickley [21]
  • 1905 Phyllis Court, Rosecroft Avenue, Hampstead [22]
  • 1905-6 St John's Church, Hall and Vicarage, Edmonton [23]
  • 1906 1 Denbridge Road, Bickley
  • 1906 Barn Hawe, 2 Denbridge Road, Bickley
  • 1906 8 Denbridge Road, Bickley
  • 1906 The Grosvenor Gallery, 157 New Bond Street (interior)
  • 1907 19 Woodlands Road, Bickley
  • 1907 24 Heath Drive, Hampstead (Listed Grade II)
  • 1907 12 Denbridge Road, Bickley [24]
  • 1907 19 St George's Road, Bickley [25]
  • 1907 Halstow, 22 St George's Road, Bickley [26]
  • 1908 Southborough House, 2 New London Rd, Chelmsford for F W Crittall
  • 1908 10 Edward Road, Bromley
  • 1909 21 St George's Road, Bickley
  • 1909 Linden Oaks, 24 St George's Road, Bickley
  • 1909 Denbridge House, Bickley
  • 1910 Englefield, 8 Woodlands Road, Bickley [27]
  • 1910 St Mark's School, Masons Hill, Bromley, Kent [28]
  • 1911 Hadlow, 6 Woodlands Road, Bickley [29]
  • 1911 Lynch House, Allerford, Somerset
  • 1912 Deerwood, 7 Woodlands Road, Bickley [30]
  • 1912 Mowden School, The Droveway, Hove [31]
  • 1912-4 Aultmore, Inverness-shire [32][33][34]
  • 1913 Orchard House, 5 Woodlands Road, Bickley [35]
  • 1918–20 Houses at Braintree (1–41 Clockhouse Way and 152–194 Cressing Road) for Crittall [36]
  • 1920 Southcourt Housing Estate, Barton Hartshorn, Buckinghamshire[37]
  • 1923 Housing Scheme, Aylesbury [38]
  • -?- 19–21 Holbrook Lane, Chislehurst, Kent" [39]
  • -?- Crabtrees, Gravel Path, Berkhamsted
  • -?- 'Crockies' (assisted by Thomas Tait – location unknown) [40]
  • 1926–32 Houses at Silver End, Essex for Crittall [41]
  • 1926 The Manors, Silver End
  • -?- Houses on Eastbury Road and Carew Road, Northwood, London
  • 1931 New House, Oak Lodge, 47,Newlands Avenue, Radlett, Hertfordshire

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/98233
  2. ^ Herman Muthesius (1904) The English House
  3. ^ Peter Quennell (1976) The Marble Foot
  4. ^ Architectural History, the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, vol. 50, pg 219, 2007
  5. ^ Dod's Parliamentary Companion, ed. C. R. Dod and R. P. Dod, Dod's Parliamentary Companion Ltd., 1967, pg 461
  6. ^ http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk/architect_full.php?id=202812
  7. ^ RIBA Journal, 22 December 1935, page 212
  8. ^ Alistair Service (1989) Victorian and Edwardian Hampstead
  9. ^ Muthesius, 1904, p. 189
  10. ^ Muthesius, 1904, p. 186
  11. ^ Muthesius, 1904, p. 123
  12. ^ Muthesius, 1904, p. 104
  13. ^ Women's Suffrage Supplement, 3 November 1910
  14. ^ The Architects' and Builders' Journal, 1 January 1919, page 3
  15. ^ The Architect's Journal, 9 April 1919
  16. ^ The Architect's Journal, 19 October 1921
  17. ^ Academy Architecture; Volume 15, 1899, page 137
  18. ^ Academy Architecture; Volume 15, 1899, page 120
  19. ^ Muthesius, 1904, p. 134
  20. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans No 3437, 1905
  21. ^ Small Country Houses of To-day, Edited by Lawrence Weaver, 1911, pages 130–3
  22. ^ Architectural Review, March 1905
  23. ^ The Builder, 25 March 1927, page 480
  24. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans no 3890, November 1907
  25. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans no 3735, January 1907
  26. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans no 3814, June 1907
  27. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plan no 4255, March 1910
  28. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans dated 22 September 1910
  29. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans no 4387, March 1911
  30. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans no 4471, January 1912
  31. ^ Modern Building Record, 1912
  32. ^ Academy Architecture; ii, 1913, pages 34 -5
  33. ^ Architectural Review No.51, 1922, pages 154–5,
  34. ^ The Architect's Journal, 19 May 1926
  35. ^ Bromley Urban District Council Plans no 4609, February 1913
  36. ^ Architectural Review, January 1919, pages 64–66
  37. ^ The Buildings of England, Buckinghamshire, N. Pevsner, E. Williamson and G. K. Brandwood
  38. ^ The Architect's Journal, 3 January 1923
  39. ^ Daylight Saving in the Suburbs, Victorian Society walk notes
  40. ^ Homes and Garden magazine, June 1931, page 23
  41. ^ Conservation Today, David Pearce, 1989

External links[edit]