C. K. Stead

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C. K. Stead
ONZ, CBE
Born Christian Karlson Stead
(1932-10-17) 17 October 1932 (age 83)
Auckland, New Zealand
Occupation Novelist, poet, literary critic
Language English
Nationality New Zealand
Education Mount Albert Grammar School
Alma mater University of Auckland (BA, 1954; MA, 1955)
University of Bristol (PhD, 1961)

Christian Karlson "Karl" Stead ONZ, CBE (born 17 October 1932) is a New Zealand writer whose works include novels, poetry, short stories, and literary criticism.[1]

One of Karl Stead's novels, Smith's Dream, provided the basis for the film Sleeping Dogs, starring Sam Neill; this became the first New Zealand film released in the United States. Mansfield: A Novel was a finalist for the 2005 Tasmania Pacific Fiction Prize and received commendation in the 2005 Commonwealth Writers Prize for the South East Asia and South Pacific region. He won the 2010 Sunday Times EFG Private Bank Short Story Award for 'Last Season’s Man'.[2][3][4]

C. K. Stead was born in Auckland. For much of his career he was Professor of English at the University of Auckland, retiring in 1986 to write full-time. He received a CBE in 1985 and was admitted into the highest honour New Zealand can bestow, the Order of New Zealand in 2007. In August 2015, he was named the New Zealand Poet Laureate for 2015 to 2017.[5]

Awards and honours[edit]

New Zealand Book Awards[edit]

  • 1976 Quesada (Poetry)
  • 1985 All Visitors Ashore (Fiction, shared with Marilyn Duckworth)
  • 1995 The Singing Whakapapa (Fiction)

Bibliography[edit]

  • Whether the Will is Free: Poems 1954-62 (1964)
  • The New Poetic (1964)
  • Smith's Dream (1971)
  • Crossing the Bar (1972)
  • Quesada: Poems 1972-74 (1975)
  • Measure for Measure (1977, editor)
  • Walking Westward (1979)
  • Five for the Symbol (1981)
  • Geographies (1982)
  • In the Glass Case: Essays on New Zealand literature (1982)
  • Poems of a Decade (1983)
  • Paris: A poem (1984)
  • All Visitors Ashore (1984)
  • The Death of the Body (1986)
  • Pound, Yeats, Eliot and the Modernist Movement (1986)
  • Between (1988)
  • Sister Hollywood (1989)
  • Answering to the Language: Essays on modern writers (1989)
  • Voices (1990)
  • The End of the Century at the End of the World (1992)
  • The Singing Whakapapa (1994)
  • Villa Vittoria (1997)
  • Straw into Gold: New and selected poems (1997)
  • The Blind Blonde with Candles in Her Hair (1998)
  • Talking About O'Dwyer (1999)
  • The Right Thing (2000)
  • The Writer at Work: Essays (2000)
  • The Secret History of Modernism (2001)
  • Dog (2002)
  • Kin of Place: Essays on 20 New Zealand writers (2002)
  • Mansfield: a novel (2004)
  • My Name Was Judas (2006)
  • The Black River (2007)
  • ′′ Book Self: Essays′′ (2008)
  • South West of Eden (A Memoir, 1932–1956, 2009)
  • Ischaemia (winning poem of the 2010 International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine)[11][12]
  • Risk (2012)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/stories/2008/2235479.htm Transcript of interview with Ramona Koval on The Book Show, ABC Radio National, 5 May 2008
  2. ^ Alison Flood (26 March 2010). "CK Stead wins short story prize". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Staff writer (26 March 2010). "New Zealand author Stead wins short story prize". BBC News. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Ed Caesar (26 March 2010). "A man for all seasons". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "CK Stead named as new NZ Poet Laureate". New Zealand Herald. 11 August 2015. Retrieved 24 September 2015. 
  6. ^ "List of fellows". Katherine Mansfield Menton Fellowship. Creative NZ. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "NZ Book Council profile". New Zealand Book Council. New Zealand Book Council. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  8. ^ a b ""New Zealand poet laureate profile"". New Zealand Poet Laureate. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  9. ^ "Previous winners". Creative New Zealand. Retrieved October 24, 2013. 
  10. ^ Somerset, Guy. "A man for all seasons?". The Listener. Bauer Media Group. Retrieved 3 June 2016. 
  11. ^ Stead, CK (2010). "Inaugural 2010 International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine: Open International 1st Prize". Postgraduate Medical Journal 87 (1023): 26–26. doi:10.1136/pgmj.2010.114199. ISSN 0032-5473. ;
  12. ^ Hulse M, Singer D, eds. The Hippocrates Prize 2010. The winning and commended poems. The Hippocrates Prize in association with Top Edge Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-9545495-5-8.
Cultural offices
Preceded by
Vincent O'Sullivan
New Zealand Poet Laureate
2015–present
Incumbent