CCGS Gordon Reid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gordon Reid and seaplane moored at Prince Rupert.jpg
Gordon Reid and de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver seaplane moored at Prince Rupert, BC.
History
Coastguard Flag of CanadaCanada
Name: Gordon Reid
Namesake: Gordon Reid
Operator: Canadian Coast Guard
Port of registry: Ottawa, Ontario
Builder: Versatile Pacific Shipyards, Vancouver, BC
Yard number: 813735
Commissioned: 1990
In service: 1990-present
Homeport: CCG Base Patricia Bay, Sidney, British Columbia
Identification: CGBR
Status: in active service
General characteristics
Type: Mid-shore patrol vessel
Tonnage: 880 GT
Length: 49.95 m (163 ft 11 in)
Beam: 11 m (36 ft 1 in)
Draft: 5.2 m (17 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
  • 4 × Deutz SBV 9M628
  • 3,580 kilowatts (4,800 hp)
Speed: Cruising 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) Max 16.5 knots (30.6 km/h; 19.0 mph)
Range: 2,500 nmi (4,600 km; 2,900 mi)
Endurance: 28 days
Complement: 14

CCGS Gordon Reid is a mid-shore patrol vessel of the Canadian Coast Guard. She operates on Canada's West Coast with a home port of Patricia Bay, British Columbia. CCGS Gordon Reid is a 49.95-metre vessel providing search and rescue coverage throughout the Pacific Coast.[1] She has a full complement 6 officers and 8 crew.

In October 2014 the Russian container ship MV Simushur lost the use of its engines near environmentally sensitive Haida Gwai.[2][3][4] The Gordon Reid was the first vessel to try to tow the disabled vessel so it didn't run aground. However the Gordon Reid's own engines were not powerful enough. The American ocean-going tug Barbara Foss was dispatched from nearby Prince Rupert to tow the disabled Russian vessel.

CGS Base Patricia Bay[edit]

Other ships at the base include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vessel - Canadian Coast Guard
  2. ^ Sarah McCoy (2014-12-23). "Oil Spill Response: USCG, CCG & Foss Team". Marine link. Archived from the original on 2015-01-10. By 1830 hours, the 164-foot CCG patrol ship Gordon Reid had arrived and managed to get the freighter under tow. Even then, the operation moved by fits and starts. Though the seas had calmed somewhat, the tow line broke three times. Nevertheless, the stricken vessel was towed westward at 1.5 knots, and by Saturday, the ship had moved about 25 miles away from shore. 
  3. ^ Bernie Smith (2014-11-05). "Reader takes issue with coastline letter". Parksville, British Columbia: Comox Valley Record. Archived from the original on 2015-01-10. Unfortunately, a modestly-powered, 50 m long Mid-Shore Patrol Vessel like the CCGS Gordon Reid had no realistic chance of towing the 9,400 tonne M/V Simushir completely out of danger. And help was still a long way off. 
  4. ^ "The Simushir incident – What vessels are required for the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) in order to protect the BC Coastal Environment?". Canadian American Strategic Review. October 2014. Archived from the original on 2015-01-10. Unfortunately, a modestly-powered, 50 m long Mid-Shore Patrol Vessel like the CCGS Gordon Reid had no realistic chance of towing the 9,400 tonne M/V Simushir completely out of danger. And help was still a long way off. 

External links[edit]