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Fc fragment of IgG, low affinity IIIa, receptor (CD16a)
Symbol FCGR3A
Alt. symbols FCGR3, FCG3
Entrez 2214
HUGO 3619
OMIM 146740
RefSeq NM_000569
UniProt P08637
Other data
Locus Chr. 1 q23
Fc fragment of IgG, low affinity IIIb, receptor (CD16b)
Symbol FCGR3B
Alt. symbols FCGR3, FCG3
Entrez 2215
HUGO 3620
OMIM 610665
RefSeq NM_000570
UniProt O75015
Other data
Locus Chr. 1 q23

CD16 is a low affinity Fc receptor.

It is a cluster of differentiation molecule found on the surface of natural killer cells, neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes and macrophages.[1] It can be used to isolate populations of these cells by antibodies directed towards CD16, using fluorescent-activated cell sorting or magnetic-activated cell sorting.


CD16 has been identified as Fc receptors FcγRIIIa (CD16a) and FcγRIIIb (CD16b). These receptors bind to the Fc portion of IgG antibodies which then activates the NK cell for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. A lack of CD16 in a given population of neutrophils may indicate prematurity, as could be caused by a left-shift due to neutrophilic leukocytosis induced by tissue necrosis or bacterial infection.


  1. ^ Janeway, Charles (2001). "Appendix II. CD antigens". Immunobiology (5 ed.). New York: Garland. ISBN 0-8153-3642-X. 

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