CFNR-FM

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CFNR-FM
CFNR-FM.png
City Terrace, British Columbia
Broadcast area Central and Northern British Columbia, Canada
Branding CFNR Network, Classic Rock
Slogan Canada's First Nations Radio
Frequency 92.1 MHz (FM)
Repeater(s) (see article)
First air date unknown
Format Classic rock music, First Nations-oriented news, sports and cultural programming
ERP 180 watts (peak)
43 watts (average)
HAAT 446 metres (1,463 ft)
Class B
Transmitter coordinates 54°31′04″N 128°28′23″W / 54.5178°N 128.473°W / 54.5178; -128.473
Callsign meaning Canada's First Nations Radio
Owner Northern Native Broadcasting (Terrace)
Website cfnrfm.ca

CFNR-FM is a Canadian radio station based in Terrace, British Columbia, owned and operated by Northern Native Broadcasting (Terrace). The station operates at 92.1 FM from the station headquarters in Terrace. The programming reflects and is broadcast to over 70 First Nations communities in northern and central British Columbia and has an audience of over 150,000 listeners.[1] Programming of CFNR-FM is distributed to numerous repeater stations in the region.

The station describes its music programming as classic rock format. Programming includes cultural events such as the Hobiyee celebrations in Vancouver and Nisga'a territory, National Indigenous Peoples Day, and cultural sports broadcasts such as the annual All-Native Tournament and the Junior all Native Basketball Tournaments.

History[edit]

CFNR received approval on July 20, 1992, Northern Native Broadcasting was granted a licence for an English-language and Native-language station at Terrace.[2] The same year, CFNR received approval to operate a number of transmitters in northern British Columbia.[3] In 1993, CFNR received approval to add more transmitters.[4] In 1994, CFNR received approval to add a transmitter at Terrace.[5]

On June 14, 2017, the CRTC granted CFNR's owner, Northern Native Broadcasting (Terrace), a license to operate a station in Vancouver at 106.3 MHz FM to serve the urban Indigenous population in that city. The frequency was previously licensed to Aboriginal Voices Radio Network which had its license revoked in 2015 for non-compliance issues. The station's call letters will be CJNY.[6]

Locations[edit]

Communities in which CFNR-FM is broadcast, with their FM frequencies (in MHz) and call sign (where known):

Rebroadcasters of CFNR-FM
City of license Identifier Frequency Power Class RECNet CRTC Decision
Alexandria VF2173 97.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Alkali Lake VF2272 96.1 FM 39 watts LP Query
Atlin VF2133 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Bella Bella VF2232 97.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Bella Coola VF2233 96.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Blueberry River VF2110 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Decker Lake VF2236 97.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Burns Lake VF2111 96.1 FM 16 watts LP Query
Fort Nelson CFNR-FM-2 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Canyon City VF2226 98.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Cheslatta VF2230 95.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Dease Lake VF2066 97.1 FM 2 watts VLP Query
Dog Creek VF2276 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Doig River VF2112 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Fort Babine VF2231 98.1 FM 6 watts VLP Query
Fort Ware VF2113 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Gitanyow (formerly Kitwancool) VF2118 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Kitseguecla VF2135 97.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Good Hope Lake VF2072 96.1 FM 2 watts VLP Query
Halfway River VF2162 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Hartley Bay CFNR-FM-5 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query Under Consideration
Hazelton VF2163 98.1 FM 26 watts LP Query
Iskut VF2114 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Kincolith VF2115 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Kitwanga VF2165 98.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Kitamaat Village VF2116 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Kitkatla VF2117 98.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Klemtu VF2227 96.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Laxgalts'ap CFNR-FM-4 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Lower Post VF2078 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Masset VF2079 96.1 FM 2 watts VLP Query
McLeod Lake VF2273 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Prince Rupert VF2119 98.1 FM 22 watts LP Query
Moberly VF2077 96.1 FM 31 watts LP Query
Smithers VF2169 95.1 FM 12 watts LP Query 2008-74
Nautley VF2274 98.1 FM 49 watts LP Query
Fort St. James VF2064 97.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Nemaiah Valley VF2228 96.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
New Aiyansh VF2271 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Port Simpson VF2170 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Redstone Flat VF2238 96.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Skidegate VF2171 97.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Stoney Creek VF2234 98.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Williams Lake VF2235 96.1 FM 43 watts LP Query
Tache VF2166 98.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Takla Landing VF2164 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Telegraph Creek VF2120 96.1 FM 8 watts VLP Query
Topley VF2229 95.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Tsay Keh Dene VF2279 96.1 FM 10 watts VLP Query
Anahim Lake VF2237 96.1 FM 11 watts LP Query
Houston CFNR-FM-6 96.1 FM 3 watts VLP Query 2016-126
Quesnel CFNR-FM-1 96.1 FM 6 watts VLP Query

On August 7, 2009, CFNR-FM applied to the CRTC to add a transmitter at Hazelton/Seely Mountain at 96.1 MHz.[7] This application was approved on December 14, 2009.[8][9]

On October 25, 2013, CFNR-FM received approval to change the authorized contours of VF2073 Quesnel by increasing the transmitter’s average effective radiated power from 1.6 to 6.5 watts (non-directional antenna) and the effective height of antenna above average terrain from 81 to 236.2 metres, and by relocating the transmitter site. The change in site was due to frequent vandalism acts committed on the site, which resulted in violations that occurred beyond the station's control, such as the transmitter broadcasting an empty carrier.[10]

On May 21, 2015, CFNR-FM received approval to operate a low-power FM rebroadcasting transmitter at Fort Nelson at 96.1 MHz with an effective radiated power (ERP) of 8 watts (non-directional antenna with an effective height of antenna above average terrain (EHAAT) of 36.7 metres).[11]

On December 8, 2015, CFNR-FM received approval to operate a low-power FM rebroadcasting transmitter at Hartley Bay at 96.1 MHz with an effective radiated power (ERP) of 8 watts (non-directional antenna with an effective height of antenna above average terrain (EHAAT) of -66.8 metres).[12]

Future transmitters[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ HARRISON MOONEY (June 15, 2017). "Aboriginal radio station coming to Vancouver in summer 2018". The Province. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Decision CRTC 92-481". CRTC. July 20, 1992. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Decision CRTC 92-1". CRTC. January 9, 1992. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  4. ^ "Decision CRTC 93-712". CRTC. December 1, 1993. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  5. ^ "Decision CRTC 94-656". CRTC. August 18, 1994. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  6. ^ "CRTC Grants Licences For Five Radio Stations to Serve Indigenous People in Urban Centres Country Wide". Turtle Island News. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2009-771". CRTC. December 10, 2009. Retrieved October 30, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2009-773". CRTC. December 14, 2009. Retrieved October 30, 2009. 
  9. ^ "Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2009-776". CRTC. December 15, 2009. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2013-567". CRTC. October 25, 2013. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2015-210". CRTC. May 21, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2015-539". CRTC. December 8, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 54°31′04″N 128°28′21″W / 54.51778°N 128.47250°W / 54.51778; -128.47250