CHCHD10

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Coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain-containing protein 10, mitochondrial, also known as Protein N27C7-4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CHCHD10 gene.[1][2][3]

Structure[edit]

The CHCHD10 gene is located on the q arm of chromosome 22 at position 11.23 and it spans 2,138 base pairs.[1] The CHCHD10 gene produces a 14.9 kDa protein composed of 149 amino acids.[4][5] It is enriched at cristae junctions in the intermembrane space of the mitochondria.[1] The structure of the protein contains a nonstructured N-terminal region, a hydrophobic helix and a C-terminal CHCH domain which contains a Cx(9)C motif and two additional cysteines. A total of four cysteines are predicted to form two disulfide bonds.[6]

Function[edit]

This gene encodes for a mitochondrial protein that is enriched at cristae junctions in the intermembrane space. It may play a role in cristae morphology maintenance or oxidative phosphorylation.[1]

Clinical significance[edit]

CHCHD10-related disorders include Myopathy, isolated mitochondrial, autosomal dominant (IMMD),[7] Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (FTDALS2),[8] Spinal muscular atrophy, Jokela type (SMAJ).[2][3]

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (FTDALS2)[edit]

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (FTDALS2) is a neurodegenerative disorder with high intrafamilial variation with phenotypes such as frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Frontotemporal dementia is characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is characterized by the death of motor neurons in the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis.[2][3]

Spinal muscular atrophy, Jokela type (SMAJ)[edit]

Spinal muscular atrophy, Jokela type (SMAJ) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive, lower motor neuron disease. SMAJ is characterized by adult-onset of muscle cramps and fasciculations affecting the proximal and distal muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The disorder results in weakness and mild muscle atrophy later in life.[2][3]

Myopathy, isolated mitochondrial, autosomal dominant (IMMD)[edit]

Myopathy, isolated mitochondrial, autosomal dominant (IMMD) is a mitochondrial myopathy presenting with severe exercise intolerance, progressive proximal weakness, and lactic acidemia. The disorder is slowly progressive, with later involvement of facial muscles, muscles of the upper limbs, and distal muscles.[2][3]

Others[edit]

Mutations in CHCHD10 has also been found to be associated with cerebellar ataxia, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other mitochondrial diseases.[8][2][3]

Interactions[edit]

CHCHD10 has been known to interact with C1QBP, CLPX,FAF1,RNASEH1,ZNF444,KLF13, and other proteins.[9][2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Entrez Gene: coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain containing 10". Retrieved 2018-08-14.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "CHCHD10 - Coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain-containing protein 10, mitochondrial precursor - Homo sapiens (Human) - CHCHD10 gene & protein". Retrieved 2018-08-07.  This article incorporates text available under the CC BY 4.0 license.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "UniProt: the universal protein knowledgebase". Nucleic Acids Research. 45 (D1): D158–D169. January 2017. doi:10.1093/nar/gkw1099. PMC 5210571Freely accessible. PMID 27899622. 
  4. ^ Zong NC, Li H, Li H, Lam MP, Jimenez RC, Kim CS, Deng N, Kim AK, Choi JH, Zelaya I, Liem D, Meyer D, Odeberg J, Fang C, Lu HJ, Xu T, Weiss J, Duan H, Uhlen M, Yates JR, Apweiler R, Ge J, Hermjakob H, Ping P (Oct 2013). "Integration of cardiac proteome biology and medicine by a specialized knowledgebase". Circulation Research. 113 (9): 1043–53. doi:10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.113.301151. PMC 4076475Freely accessible. PMID 23965338. 
  5. ^ "Coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain-containing protein 10, mitochondrial". Cardiac Organellar Protein Atlas Knowledgebase (COPaKB). 
  6. ^ Bannwarth, S; Ait-El-Mkadem, S; Chaussenot, A; Genin, EC; Lacas-Gervais, S; Fragaki, K; Berg-Alonso, L; Kageyama, Y; Serre, V; Moore, DG; Verschueren, A; Rouzier, C; Le Ber, I; Augé, G; Cochaud, C; Lespinasse, F; N'Guyen, K; de Septenville, A; Brice, A; Yu-Wai-Man, P; Sesaki, H; Pouget, J; Paquis-Flucklinger, V (August 2014). "A mitochondrial origin for frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through CHCHD10 involvement". Brain : a journal of neurology. 137 (Pt 8): 2329–45. doi:10.1093/brain/awu138. PMID 24934289. 
  7. ^ Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Fecto, Faisal (6 September 2014). "Mutation in the novel nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein CHCHD10 in a family with autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy". Neurogenetics. 16 (1): 1–9. doi:10.1007/s10048-014-0421-1. PMC 4796476Freely accessible. Retrieved 10 November 2015.  ===Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (FTDALS2)===
  8. ^ a b Bannwarth, Sylvie; Ait-El-Mkadem, Samira (16 June 2014). "A mitochondrial origin for frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through CHCHD10 involvement". Brain. 137: 2329–2345. doi:10.1093/brain/awu138. PMC 4107737Freely accessible. PMID 24934289. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  9. ^ Mick DU, Dennerlein S, Wiese H, Reinhold R, Pacheu-Grau D, Lorenzi I, Sasarman F, Weraarpachai W, Shoubridge EA, Warscheid B, Rehling P (December 2012). "MITRAC links mitochondrial protein translocation to respiratory-chain assembly and translational regulation". Cell. 151 (7): 1528–41. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2012.11.053. PMID 23260140. 

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine ([1]), which is in the public domain.