CJ-10 (missile)

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CJ-10
CJ-10 Cruise missile 20170919.jpg
CJ-10 Cruise missile on WS2400 TEL
TypeLand attack cruise missile
Air-launched cruise missile
Place of originChina
Service history
Used byChina
Production history
ManufacturerChina Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation/China Haiying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy
Specifications
Warhead500 kg (1,100 lb)[1], conventional or nuclear[2]

Operational
range
>1,500 km (930 mi; 810 nmi)
Launch
platform

The CJ-10 (simplified Chinese: 长剑-10; traditional Chinese: 長劍-10; pinyin: Cháng Jiàn 10; literally: "long sword 10") is a second-generation[1] Chinese ground-based land-attack missile.[5] It is derived from the Kh-55 missile.[6] It is reportedly manufactured by the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation Third Academy and the China Haiying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy.[1]

Initially, the CJ-10 was identified as the DH-10 (Chinese: 东海-10; pinyin: Dong Hai 10; literally: "east sea 10") by Western media and analysts.[7][8] United States Department of Defense reports used "DH-10" until 2011,[9][10] and then "CJ-10" from 2012.[11][12] Publications may use both terms interchangeably.[1][13] The Center for Strategic and International Studies believes that the CJ-10 is a member of the Hongniao (HN) series of missiles[14]; Ian Easton believes that the CJ-10 is the same missile as the HN-2, and that the HN-3 is the "DH-10A".[15]

Description[edit]

In the September 2014 edition of Joint Forces Quarterly, an article reportedly described CJ-10 as a subsonic missile with a range of more than 1,500 km and a 500 kg payload. The article attributes the missile having a guidance package using inertial navigation system, satellite navigation, Terrain Contour Matching, and a likely Digital Scene-Mapping Area Correlator for terminal guidance. Ships and ground transporter erector launchers were listed as launch platforms.[1]

In 2013, the United States believes that the missile has a range of more than 1,500 km, and can potentially carry either conventional or nuclear payloads;[2] other sources claim the missile has ranges of 2,000 km (1,200 mi; 1,100 nmi),[16] or as much as 4,000 km (2,500 mi; 2,200 nmi).[17] In 2004, the CJ-10 was credited with a CEP of 10 m.[18]

The YJ-100 is a subsonic anti-ship missile version of the CJ-10 with a range of 800 km (500 mi; 430 nmi). The missile can be air-launched by the H-6 bomber and fired from a vertical launch system of the Type 055 destroyer.[19] The YJ-100 will have an onboard radar and is potentially a counter to the American Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM).[20]

Development[edit]

The development of the CJ-10 could have potentially benefited significantly from Chinese acquisition of Western and Soviet missile technology in the 1990s, notably the Kh-55 (purchased from Ukraine), and the Tomahawk missiles (that were unexploded and parts purchased from Iraq, Pakistan, and Serbia).[15] The detailed production engineering data packages of the Kh-55SM/Korshun LACM were bought from Kiev by 2001 which had by then been developed by Ukraine’s Dnipropetrovsk-based Yuzhnoye State Design Bureau.[21] A 1995 Russian document suggested a complete production facility had been transferred to Shanghai, for the development of a nuclear-armed cruise missile. Originally it was thought that this was based on the 300 km-range Raduga Kh-15 (AS-16 'Kickback'), but it now appears that it was the Kh-55 that was transferred to China.[6]

Jane's Information Group reported the CJ-10 was tested 2004.[18] An August 2012 report by Jane's indicated that a shipborne variance of the missile may have been tested on Bi Sheng, a Chinese weapons trial ship.[22]

The United States in 2008 estimated that 50–250 missiles were in service,[23] increasing to 150–350 in 2009.[24]

Variants[edit]

CJ-10
CJ-10K
Air-launched version with a 1500 km range; may be carried by the Xian H-6K.[25]
DF-10A
Ground attack cruise missile.[25] Reportedly a stealthier, more accurate, version of the CJ-10.[15]
"DH-2000"
Supposedly a supersonic version of the DH-10A.[26]
CJ-20
Air-launched version of the CJ-10.[27] Reportedly been tested on the Xian H-6; each bomber may carry four missiles externally.[28]
YJ-100
Anti-ship missile version with an 800 km range, launched by H-6 bomber and Type 055 warship.[20][19]

Operators[edit]

 China

See also[edit]

  • YJ-62 – similar anti-ship missile

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Gormley et. al: p.102
  2. ^ a b United States National Air and Space Intelligence Center Public Affairs Office: p.29
  3. ^ "PLA's Type 093G submarines 'could destroy Izumo'". Want China Times. 7 April 2015. Archived from the original on 19 July 2015. Retrieved 5 August 2015.
  4. ^ "China Destroyer Consolidates Innovations, Other Ship Advances". AFCEA. 1 December 2013.
  5. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2015, p.39
  6. ^ a b "China's new cruise missile programme 'racing ahead'". Jane's Defence Weekly. 12 January 2000. Archived from the original on 4 June 2009.
  7. ^ Kopp, Carlo; Andrew, Martin (27 January 2014). "PLA Cruise Missiles; PLA Air–Surface Missiles". Air Power Australia.net. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  8. ^ Easton: p.1
  9. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2011, p.2
  10. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2011, p.31
  11. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2012, p.21
  12. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2012, p.42
  13. ^ United States National Air and Space Intelligence Center Public Affairs Office: p.27
  14. ^ https://missilethreat.csis.org/missile/hong-niao/
  15. ^ a b c Easton: p.3
  16. ^ "DF-10 / CJ-10 / DH-10 surface-to-surface cruise missile". Army Recognition.com. 23 January 2016.
  17. ^ "Glimpse of China's New Fighter Fuels Rumors". Defense News.com. 5 August 2012.
  18. ^ a b Minnick, Wendell (21 September 2004). "China tests new land-attack cruise missile". Jane's. Archived from the original on 29 September 2004. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  19. ^ a b "China's anti-ship missiles YJ-12 and YJ-100 revealed". China Military Online. 4 February 2015.
  20. ^ a b Lin, Jeffrey; Singer, P. W. (10 March 2015). "China Shows Off Its Deadly New Cruise Missiles". Popular Science.
  21. ^ "Hatf-7 Babur GLCM". Global Security. Retrieved 16 September 2016.
  22. ^ Rahmat, Ridzwan (14 October 2014). "PLAN commissions fourth Dahua-class vessel". Jane's. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  23. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense (2008). Annual Report To Congress: Military Power of the People's Republic of China 2008 (PDF) (Report). p. 56. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  24. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense (2009). Annual Report To Congress: Military Power of the People's Republic of China 2009 (PDF) (Report). p. 66. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  25. ^ a b Fisher, Richard D., Jr. (4 September 2015). "China showcases new weapon systems at 3 September parade". IHS Jane's 360. Retrieved 4 September 2015.
  26. ^ Easton: p.5
  27. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2015, p.46
  28. ^ Gormley et. al: p.103
  29. ^ United States Office of the Secretary of Defense: Annual Report To Congress 2010, p.31
Bibliography