CL 16

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CL 16
CL 16 sail badge.png
CL 16 sailboat 5668.jpg
Development
DesignerIan Proctor, Graham Dodd and George Blanchard
LocationCanada
Year1968
No. built1100
Builder(s)C&L Boatworks
NameCL 16
Crewtwo
Boat
Crewtwo
Boat weight365 lb (166 kg)
Draft3.83 ft (1.17 m) with centreboard down
Hull
Typemonohull
Constructionfibreglass
LOA16.00 ft (4.88 m)
LWL14.83 ft (4.52 m)
Beam6.08 ft (1.85 m)
Hull appendages
Keel/board typecentreboard
Rudder(s)transom-mounted rudder
Rig
Rig typeBermuda rig
Sails
Sailplanfractional rigged sloop
Mainsail area95 sq ft (8.8 m2)
Jib/genoa area46.7 sq ft (4.34 m2)
Total sail area141.7 sq ft (13.16 m2)
Racing
D-PN97

The CL 16, or CL16, is a Canadian sailing dinghy that was designed by Ian Proctor, Graham Dodd and George Blanchard, as a cruiser and daysailer, and first built in 1968.[1][2][3]

The CL 16 is a development of Proctor's 1957 Wayfarer design and is identical in dimensions and shape, with differences only in interior details.[1][4][5]

Production[edit]

The design has been built by C&L Boatworks since 1968 in Belleville, Ontario and more recently in Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada. It remains in production.[1][6][3][7]

Design[edit]

Henry Croce and Ken Lofthouse of Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia started as importers of the wooden Wayfarer, until a labour strike in the UK cut off the supply. They had the boat adapted for fibreglass construction and started their own production line as C&L. Ian Proctor considered it an unauthorized copy of the Wayfarer.[5][8]

The CL 16 is a recreational sailboat, built predominantly of fibreglass, with mahogany wood trim. It has double-chined; planing hull; a fractional sloop rig; a raked stem; a plumb transom; a transom-hung, kick-up, fibreglass rudder with an aluminum head, controlled by a tiller and a retractable centreboard. Unusually for a dinghy the mainsail is equipped with one set of reefing points. The boat displaces 365 lb (166 kg).[1][3]

The boat has a draft of 3.83 ft (1.17 m) with the centreboard extended and 0.67 ft (0.20 m) with it retracted, allowing beaching or ground transportation on a trailer.[1]

A motor bracket is a factory option, to allow the boat to be fitted with a small outboard motor for docking and manoeuvring.[1][3]

The boat is designed to be sailed by a crew of two, but can accommodate up to six people.[3]

For sailing the design may be equipped with a spinnaker and a trapeze.[3]

Operational history[edit]

In a review the Outer Harbour Centreboard Club wrote:

[T]he 16 has proven itself to be a remarkable dinghy that is able to perform as well as it can last. Every 16 was built to last for the long haul; hand laid up using the best materials, outfitted with high quality durable rigging and fittings and backed by the builder ... This unchanged design is the 16's greatest selling point – a product that has lasted more than 40 years relatively unchanged obviously is the right design and allows for all CL16s no matter what year to compete and its sailors are able to talk about every boat with out worrying. The continuity of the 16 assures resale value should that time come. The present day 16 is an attractive well mannered proper little sailboat.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f McArthur, Bruce (2020). "CL 16 sailboat". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 25 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  2. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2021). "Ian Proctor 1918 - 1992". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 24 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e f C&L Boatworks (2018). "CL 16". clboatworks.com. Archived from the original on 24 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  4. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2021). "Wayfarer". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  5. ^ a b Proctor, Ian (June 1968). "Letter to the Canadian Wayfarer Association". wayfarer-canada.org. Archived from the original on 1 August 2016. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  6. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2021). "C&L Boatworks". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 24 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  7. ^ C&L Boatworks (2018). "Boatyard Information". clboatworks.com. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  8. ^ Adams, Andy. "C & L Boatworks - Everything That's Old Is New Again!". Boating Industry Canada. Archived from the original on 24 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  9. ^ Outer Harbour Centreboard Club. "CL 14/16 – built to last for the long haul". sailohcc.ca. Archived from the original on 30 July 2013. Retrieved 15 August 2021.

External links[edit]