CNCP Telecommunications

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Restored CNCP counter on display at the Saskatchewan Railway Museum

CNCP Telecommunications (Canadian National-Canadian Pacific Telecommunications) was an electrical telegraph operator and later as a telecom company. CNCP was created as a joint venture between the Canadian National Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1967, replacing the different networks used by the two railway companies (CN Telegraph interchanged traffic with the Postal Telegraph Cable Company in the US while CPR Telegraphs networked with Western Union). The two networks, former rivals, had been co-operating increasingly since the 1930s By 1980, CNCP was no longer a telegraph company and emerged as an early telecom company. A 40% stake was acquired by Rogers Communications in 1984 and CP acquired CN's stake. The network was dissolved in 1988 and Rogers renamed the company Unitel Communications Incorporated in 1989. The new company was later acquired by AT&T Canada (now Allstream). The telegram division was later acquired by iTelegram and renamed Telegrams Canada in 2002.

CNCP Facsroute[edit]

CNCP FacsRoute was a Canadian telecommunications network that delivered fax documents, circa 1988. Initially, a store & forward fax service was provided over an X.25 data network, and presented to the market with all the traditional "value added" arguments; it peaked at $2 million revenue and 2,000 subscribers. A year later the regulator allowed real time FacsRoute, which attracted $40 million and 50,000 subscribers of the 300,000 fax terminals then in Canada, doing so in 9 months. Real time FacsRoute was provided over a 64kbit/s bypass GSTN via "voice busters" which cut the dialed connection after a cumulative 70 seconds of speech per call: a remarkably "value subtracted" way of bringing a transcontinental 64kbit/s service to market, but a 20-fold increase in business over the S&F FacsRoute Plus.

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