CONCACAF Gold Cup

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
CONCACAF Gold Cup
Coupe D'or CONCACAF (French)
Copa de Oro CONCACAF (Spanish)
Concacaf Gold Cup 2021.svg
Founded1991; 30 years ago (1991)[1][2]
RegionNorth America, Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF)
Number of teams16 (finals)
Related competitionsCONCACAF Championship
Current champions United States (7th title)
Most successful team(s) Mexico (11 titles)
2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup

The CONCACAF Gold Cup (Spanish: Copa de Oro de la CONCACAF, French: Coupe D'or CONCACAF) is the main association football competition of the men's national football teams governed by CONCACAF, determining the continental champion of North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean. The Gold Cup is held every two years. The tournament succeeded the CONCACAF Championship (1963–1989), with its inaugural edition being held in 1991.[1]

History[edit]

Winners of the CONCACAF Gold Cup up to 2019

Championships before CONCACAF[edit]

Before the Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) was formed in 1961, association football in the region was divided into smaller, regional divisions. The two main bodies consisted of the Confederación Centroamericana y del Caribe de Fútbol (CCCF) founded in 1938 (consisting of Central America and most of the Caribbean) and the North American Football Confederation (NAFC) founded in 1946 (consisting of the North American nations of United States, Mexico, Canada, and Cuba). Each confederation held its own competition, the CCCF Championship and the NAFC Championship. The CCCF held 10 championships from 1941–'61, Costa Rica winning seven ('41, ’46, ’48, ’53, ’55, ’60, ’61), and one each by El Salvador ('43), Panama ('51) and Haiti ('57). The NAFC held four championships in 1947 and '49 and later, after 41 years of absence, in 1990 and '91 for the North American zone as the North American Nations Cup with Mexico winning three times ('47, ’49 & '91) and Canada winning once ('90).[3]

CONCACAF Championship (1963–1989)[edit]

CONCACAF was founded in 1961 through the merging of NAFC and CCCF which resulted in a single championship being held for the continent. The first CONCACAF tournament was held in 1963 in El Salvador with Costa Rica becoming the first champion. The CONCACAF Campeonato de Naciones, as it was called, was held every two years from 1963 to 1973. The second tournament was held in Guatemala in 1965 when Mexico defeated the host country in the final of a six-team tournament. The 1967 competition was held in Honduras and saw a third champion crowned, Guatemala. Costa Rica won their second title as hosts in 1969, knocking off Guatemala, while two years later, Mexico won their second championship as the tournament moved to Trinidad & Tobago, the first time in the Caribbean. In 1973, the tournament kept the same format of six teams playing a single round-robin, but there were bigger stakes attached: CONCACAF's berth in the FIFA World Cup tournament in 1974. In Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the host country pulled off an upset by winning the tournament and claiming a spot in the World Cup in West Germany.

With the Campeonato de Naciones doubling as the final World Cup qualifying tournament, the next two editions were held in Mexico City and Tegucigalpa, Honduras in 1977 and 1981, respectively. In each case the host country was crowned champion and earned a spot in the World Cup. In 1985 and 1989, the winner of the World Cup qualifying tournament was again crowned Confederation champion. Canada and Costa Rica were named champions in 1985 and 1989, receiving a trophy.[4][better source needed]

CONCACAF Gold Cup (since 1991)[edit]

In 1990, CONCACAF renamed and restructured the CONCACAF Championship as the CONCACAF Gold Cup, with the United States hosting the first competition in 1991, and hosting or co-hosting every subsequent iteration of the tournament (as of 2021). The host country was the inaugural champion of the eight-team tournament. Mexico dominated the remainder of the decade, winning three consecutive CONCACAF Gold Cup titles in 1993, 1996 and 1998.

In 1996, the Gold Cup field included its first guest team, the defending FIFA World Cup Champions Brazil. Guests were invited to participate in the six Gold Cup tournaments from 1996 to 2005. Starting with the 2000 Gold Cup, the tournament field was increased to twelve teams and for the 2007 tournament, the Gold Cup again was contested exclusively by nations within CONCACAF.

The 2007 Gold Cup hosts successfully defended their title beating Mexico in the final 2–1 in Chicago; Canada and Guadeloupe shared third place. Mexico won the 2009 Gold Cup by beating the United States 5–0. In the 2011 Gold Cup, Mexico defeated the USA 4–2 in the final while the USA won the 2013 Gold Cup by beating Panama 1–0.

Since the formation of the Gold Cup in 1991, the CONCACAF Championship has been won eight times by Mexico, seven times by the United States, and once by Canada. Runners-up include Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Panama, and Jamaica.

Before 2015, when the Gold Cup did not fall in the same year as the FIFA Confederations Cup, the winner, or highest-placed team that is a member of both CONCACAF and FIFA, qualified for the next staging of that tournament. In 2015, the winners of the previous two Gold Cups (the 2013 and 2015 editions) faced each other in CONCACAF Cup – a playoff to determine the CONCACAF entrant to the 2017 Confederations Cup.[5]

In January 2017, Victor Montagliani announced the expansion of the Gold Cup from 12 to 16 teams, starting with the 2019 tournament.[6] In November 2018, Costa Rica was announced as one of the hosts of the 2019 tournament, with a group B double-header set to be held at the Estadio Nacional.[7] In April 2019, it was announced that Jamaica would host a doubleheader in group C at Independence Park.[8]

Invitees[edit]

The 1996 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the first iteration to have a guest from a different confederation, Brazil from CONMEBOL. In spite of bringing their under-23 team, Brazil finished as runner-ups to Mexico and outplaced 7 teams from CONCACAF.[9] For the next decade, six countries from three confederations would make appearances in the Gold Cup, with seven of the eleven appearances finishing within the top four (Brazil in 1998 and 2003, Colombia in 2000 and 2005, Peru in 2000, and South Korea in 2002). During this time, the only teams from CONCACAF that placed 1st were Mexico in 1996, 1998, and 2003, the United States in 2002 and 2005, and Canada in 2000.[10] However, starting in 2007, CONCACAF would no longer invite guests from other confederations. This is primarily due to giving more opportunities from teams in the region to compete, as there was a rise in performances from the region hinted by the FIFA World Ranking.[11][12] Initially for 2021, the trend of no countries outside the region being invited would continue, until CONCACAF decided to invite Qatar, who would finish in the top four in 2021. This is mostly due to CONCACAF's collaboration with the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and as such Qatar would also be invited for 2023.[13] As the United States defeated Mexico in 2021, all seven iterations with countries outside the region were won by CONCACAF members.[14]

Invitees nations record[edit]

Team Confederation 1996 1998 2000 2002 2003 2005 2021 2023 Editions
 Brazil CONMEBOL 2nd 3rd  –  – 2nd  –  –  – 3
 Colombia CONMEBOL  –  – 2nd  – QF 3rd  –  – 3
 Peru CONMEBOL  –  – 3rd  –  –  –  –  – 1
 South Korea AFC  –  – GS 4th  –  –  –  – 2
 Ecuador CONMEBOL  –  –  – GS  –  –  –  – 1
 South Africa CAF  –  –  –  –  – QF  –  – 1
 Qatar AFC  –  –  –  –  –  – 3rd  – 1

Results[edit]

CONCACAF Championship (1963–1989)
No. Year Host(s) Final group rank Teams
Champions Runners-up Third place Fourth place
1 1963  El Salvador
Costa Rica

El Salvador

Netherlands Antilles

Honduras
9
2 1965  Guatemala
Mexico

Guatemala

Costa Rica

El Salvador
6
3 1967  Honduras
Guatemala

Mexico

Honduras

Trinidad and Tobago
6
4 1969  Costa Rica
Costa Rica

Guatemala

Netherlands Antilles

Mexico
6
5 1971  Trinidad and Tobago
Mexico

Haiti

Costa Rica

Cuba
6
World Cup Qualifying Period
6 1973  Haiti
Haiti

Trinidad and Tobago

Mexico

Honduras
6
7 1977  Mexico
Mexico

Haiti

El Salvador

Canada
6
8 1981  Honduras
Honduras

El Salvador

Mexico

Canada
6
9 1985 CONCACAF (no fixed venue)
Canada

Honduras

Costa Rica

El Salvador
9
10 1989 CONCACAF (no fixed venue)
Costa Rica

United States

Trinidad and Tobago

Guatemala
5
CONCACAF Gold Cup (1991–present)
No. Year Host(s) Final Third place match Teams
Champions Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
1 1991  United States
United States
0–0 (a.e.t.)
(4–3 pen.)

Honduras

Mexico
2–0
Costa Rica
8
2 1993  United States
 Mexico

Mexico
4–0
United States

Costa Rica
1–1
(a.e.t.)
(1)

Jamaica
8
3 1996  United States
Mexico
2–0
Brazil

United States
3–0
Guatemala
9
4 1998  United States
Mexico
1–0
United States

Brazil
1–0
Jamaica
10
5 2000  United States
Canada
2–0
Colombia
Not Held 12
 Peru
 Trinidad and Tobago
6 2002  United States
United States
2–0
Costa Rica

Canada
2–1
South Korea
12
7 2003  United States
 Mexico

Mexico
1–0
(a.s.d.e.t.)

Brazil

United States
3–2
Costa Rica
12
8 2005  United States
United States
0–0 (a.e.t.)
(3–1 pen.)

Panama
Not held 12
 Colombia
 Honduras
9 2007  United States
United States
2–1
Mexico
 Canada
Guadeloupe Guadeloupe
12
10 2009  United States
Mexico
5–0
United States
 Costa Rica
 Honduras
12
11 2011  United States
Mexico
4–2
United States
 Honduras
 Panama
12
12 2013  United States
United States
1–0
Panama
 Honduras
 Mexico
12
13 2015  United States
 Canada

Mexico
3–1
Jamaica

Panama
1–1 (a.e.t.)
(3–2 p)

United States
12
14 2017  United States
United States
2–1
Jamaica
Not held 12
 Costa Rica
 Mexico
15 2019  United States
 Costa Rica
 Jamaica

Mexico
1–0
United States
 Haiti
 Jamaica
16
16 2021  United States
United States
1–0 (a.e.t.)
Mexico
 Canada
 Qatar
16
  • a.e.t.: after extra time
  • a.s.d.e.t.: after sudden death extra time
  • pen: after penalty shoot-out

(1) Costa Rica and Jamaica shared third place.

Records and statistics[edit]

Media coverage[edit]

In the United States, the CONCACAF Gold Cup airs on Fox Sports and Univision (since 2000). In Mexico it airs on Televisa and TV Azteca. In Canada, after years on Sportsnet and TSN, it will be broadcast exclusively on OneSoccer starting in 2021.

Official songs[edit]

Like most international football tournaments, the CONCACAF Gold Cup has featured official songs for each tournament since 2002. Unlike most larger tournaments, such as the FIFA World Cup, the songs were usually mainstream music released at around the same year of each tournament often by artists/groups based in the host country(ies) except in 2003, 2015, and 2021,[citation needed] in English and/or Spanish (the tournament's official languages), as well as several other languages.

Gold Cup Official Song/Anthem(s) Language(s) Performer(s) Home country
2002 "More Than a Woman" English Aaliyah  United States
2003 "That Don't Impress Me Much (Greatest Hits version)" English Shania Twain  Canada
2005 "Broken Home" English Fan 3  United States
2007 "Hit Me Up" English Gia Farrell
"Baila la Copa"[a] Spanish Osé  Venezuela
2009 "Know Your Enemy" English Green Day  United States
2011 "More (RedOne Jimmy Joker Remix)" English Usher
2013 "Cups" English Anna Kendrick
"Superhero" English Sophia & A-Lo  Canada
2015 "Sun Goes Down" English Robin Schulz with Jasmine Thompson  England (Thompson)
 Germany (Schulz)
"All the Way" English
Spanish
Reykon with Bebe Rexha  Colombia (Reykon)
 United States (Rexha)
"You Are Unstoppable" English Conchita Wurst  Austria
2017 "The Arena"
"Don't Let This Feeling Fade"
English Lindsey Stirling  United States
"Bia Beraghsim" English
Persian
Mahan Moin  Sweden
"Levántate" Spanish Gale  Puerto Rico
"Thunder"
"Whatever It Takes"
English Imagine Dragons  United States
2019 "He Loves U Not" English Dream
"My Way" English Limp Bizkit
"Caliente" Spanish
Portuguese
Lali ft. Pabllo Vittar  Argentina
 Brazil
"Kobotama" English Sam Renascent  Belgium
2021 "All Things (Just Keep Getting Better)" English Widelife with Simone Denny  Canada
"Cool"[b] English Samantha Mumba  Ireland
"Glorious" English All Saints  England
 Canada
"Fútbol a la Gente"[c] Spanish Guaynaa ft. Los Ángeles Azules  Puerto Rico (Guaynaa)
 Mexico (Los Ángeles Azules)
"Juega" Spanish
English
Cali y El Dandee ft. Charly Black  Colombia (Cali y El Dandee)
 Jamaica (Black)
"Pa'Lante" Spanish
English
Lao Ra ft. Happy Colors  Colombia (Lao Ra)
 Dominican Republic (Happy Colors)
"Would I Lie" English Keiino ft. Electric Fields  Norway (KEIINO)
 Australia (Electric Fields)
"Let Me Go" Robin Schulz ft. Emin Agalarov  Germany (Schulz)
 Azerbaijan (Emin)
"Matches" Britney Spears and Backstreet Boys  United States

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Was also used for the 2007 Copa América
  2. ^ "Baby Come on Over" and Gotta Tell You" were also initially selected but were replaced after their usage was rejected by Polydor Records, Mumba’s previous label
  3. ^ Was also used for Univision's coverage of the 2021 Copa América and UEFA Euro 2020

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About Gold Cup". CONCACAF. 17 December 2020. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  2. ^ "2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup – Technical Report" (PDF). CONCACAF. 12 November 2007. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 November 2016. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  3. ^ http://www.goldcup.org
  4. ^ "1985 Gabriel Kafaty Cup". Flickr. 3 April 2009. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  5. ^ "2013, 2015 CONCACAF Gold Cup winners will play one-off match for 2017 Confederations Cup berth". MLS Soccer. April 5, 2013.
  6. ^ "Montagliani happy with 2016, sees big things for CONCACAF in new year". Jamaica Observer. 5 January 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-02-14. Retrieved 13 February 2017. Of course the Gold Cup is this year and it is the last edition of 12 teams as we will increase it to 16 for the 2019 version.
  7. ^ "Costa Rica to host 2019 Gold Cup group matches". 26 November 2018. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  8. ^ "Concacaf Announces Jamaica as a Host Venue for the 2019 Gold Cup". 2 April 2019. Archived from the original on 11 May 2019. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  9. ^ "CONCACAF Championship, Gold Cup 1996". Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  10. ^ "About the Gold Cup". CONCACAF. 17 December 2020. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  11. ^ "2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup™ to be an All-CONCACAF Event". SoCa Warriors Forum. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  12. ^ "2007 Gold Cup Technical Report". ISSUU. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  13. ^ "2021 Concacaf Gold Cup to include 2019 AFC Asian Cup Champions Qatar as guest participant". CONCACAF. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  14. ^ "UNITED STATES vs. MEXICO - Boxscore - August 01, 2021". Fox Sports. Retrieved 2 August 2021.

External links[edit]