COVID-19 pandemic in Mississippi

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COVID-19 pandemic in Mississippi
COVID-19 Prevalence in Mississippi by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in Mississippi by percent infected (as of May 26)
  1.00%+ confirmed infected
  0.50%-1.00% confirmed infected
  0.10%-0.50% confirmed infected
  0.02%-0.10% confirmed infected
  0.00%-0.02% confirmed infected
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationMississippi, U.S
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseForrest County
Arrival dateMarch 12, 2020[1]
Confirmed cases11,704
Hospitalized cases441 (current)
1,840 (cumulative)
Critical cases153 (current)
Ventilator cases87 (current)
Recovered7,681
Deaths
554
Government website
Mississippi State Department of Health

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Mississippi in March 2020.

Timeline[edit]

COVID-19 cases in Mississippi, United States  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Confirmed cases

Mar Mar Apr Apr May May Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-11
1(0) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-12
1(=) 0
2020-03-13
6(+500%) 0
2020-03-15
10(+67%) 0
2020-03-16
12(+20%) 0
2020-03-17
21(+75%) 0
2020-03-18
34(+62%) 0
2020-03-19
50(+47%) 1
2020-03-20
80(+60%) 1(=)
2020-03-21
140(+75%) 1(=)
2020-03-22
207(+48%) 1(=)
2020-03-23
249(+20%) 1(=)
2020-03-24
320(+29%) 1(=)
2020-03-25
377(+18%) 5(+400%)
2020-03-26
485(+29%) 6(+20%)
2020-03-27
579(+19%) 8(+33%)
2020-03-28
663(+15%) 13(+63%)
2020-03-29
758(+14%) 14(+8%)
2020-03-30
847(+12%) 16(+14%)
2020-03-31
937(+11%) 20(+25%)
2020-04-01
1,073(+15%) 22(+10%)
2020-04-02
1,177(+10%) 26(+18%)
2020-04-03
1,358(+15%) 29(+10%)
2020-04-04
1,455(+7%) 35(+21%)
2020-04-05
1,638(+13%) 43(+23%)
2020-04-06
1,738(+6%) 51(+19%)
2020-04-07
1,915(+10%) 59(+16%)
2020-04-08
2,003(+5%) 67(+14%)
2020-04-09
2,260(+13%) 76(+13%)
2020-04-10
2,469(+9%) 82(+8%)
2020-04-11
2,642(+7%) 93(+13%)
2020-04-12
2,781(+5%) 96(+3%)
2020-04-13
2,942(+6%) 98(+2%)
2020-04-14
3,087(+5%) 111(+13%)
2020-04-15
3,360(+9%) 122(+10%)
2020-04-16
3,624(+8%) 129(+6%)
2020-04-17
3,793(+5%) 140(+9%)
2020-04-18
3,974(+5%) 152(+9%)
2020-04-19
4,274(+8%) 152(+4%)
2020-04-20
4,512(+6%) 169(+6%)
2020-04-21
4,716(+5%) 183(+8%)
2020-04-22
4,894(+4%) 193(+5%)
2020-04-23
5,153(+5%) 201(+4%)
2020-04-24
5,434(+5%) 209(+4%)
2020-04-25
5,718(+5%) 221(+6%)
2020-04-26
5,911(+3%) 227(+3%)
2020-04-27
6,094(+3%) 229(+1%)
2020-04-28
6,342(+4%) 239(+4%)
2020-04-29
6,569(+4%) 250(+5%)
2020-04-30
6,815(+4%) 261(+4%)
2020-05-01
7,212(+6%) 281(+8%)
2020-05-02
7,441(+3%) 291(+4%)
2020-05-03
7,550(+1%) 303(+4%)
2020-05-04
7,877(+4%) 310(+2%)
2020-05-05
8,207(+4%) 342(+10%)
2020-05-06
8,424(+3%) 374(+9%)
2020-05-07
8,686(+3%) 396(+6%)
2020-05-08
9,090(+5%) 409(+3%)
2020-05-09
9,378(+3%) 421(+3%)
2020-05-10
9,501(+1%) 430(+2%)
2020-05-11
9,674(+2%) 435(+1%)
2020-05-12
9,908(+2%) 457(+5%)
2020-05-13
10,090(+2%) 465(+2%)
2020-05-14
10,483(+4%) 480(+3%)
2020-05-15
10,801(+3%) 493(+3%)
2020-05-16
11,123(+3%) 510(+3%)
2020-05-17
11,296(+2%) 521(+2%)
2020-05-18
11,432(+1%) 528(+1%)
2020-05-19
11,967(+5%) 570(+8%)
2020-05-20
12,222(+2%) 580(+2%)
2020-05-21
12,624(+3%) 596(+3%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Mississippi.
Sources: MSDH.

The Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) confirmed their first case in the state on March 12, 2020, in an individual from Forrest County who had recently traveled to Florida.[1] Three days later, on March 15, the state had a spike in cases (4) in the state bringing the total to 10.[2] On March 16, two new cases in the state, one in Pearl River County and another Monroe County.[3] On March 17, cases in the state jumped from 12 to 21, with 4 in Hinds County, 3 in Leflore County, one in Jackson County, and one in Harrison County. The next day, on March 18, cases spiked up to 34, with DeSoto County seeing their first case, along with Madison County and Perry County. Bolivar County saw their first 2 cases. The following day, on March 19, the state saw 16 cases and its first death.[4] Harris and Pearl River counties saw 3 new cases each, while the counties of DeSoto, Forrest, and Jackson counties saw one additional case, while at least one new case were reported in the counties of Holmes, Jones, Smith, Walthall, Wilkinson, Winston, and Yazoo. On March 20, the state saw 30 new cases, bringing the total up to 80. New cases were reported in Adams, Franklin, Humphreys, Lawrence, Lee, Marshall, Monroe, Pike, Rankin, Tippah, and Webster counties, while additional cases were reported in Coahoma, DeSoto, Hancock, Harrison, Hinds, Holmes, Jackson, and Madison counties.[5] On March 21, the state jumped in cases, reporting 60 new cases, jumping the total to 140.[6] March 22 saw 67 new cases in the state, with most counties in the state ending up with a new case.[7]

Government responses[edit]

On March 14, two days after the first case was announced in the state, Governor Tate Reeves, declared a state of emergency, due to how big of an impact the neighboring state of Louisiana, has had with the virus. Louisiana at the time was the most infected state per capita.[8] Reeves recently came back from a trip from Spain (a country hit hard by the virus) and stated that he will voluntarily work from home for precautionary purposes.[8]

March 15, Jackson's city mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba declared civil emergency for the city.[9]

On March 21, the mayor of Tupelo, Jason Shelton, imposed a stay-at-home order that went into effect early on March 22.[10] The same day, Columbus put in a curfew from 10 pm to 6 am until further notice.[11]

On March 24, Governor Reeves issued an executive order deeming most businesses as "essential" including restaurants, bars and other establishments including dining in but limiting to 10 persons. The order also banned local governments from imposing stricter orders.[12] However, the wording of the executive order lead to some confusion among local governments on the authority of the state overriding that of restrictions put into place by municipalities and counties.[13] In response to criticism and confusion expressed by the public and local officials, Governor Reeves issued a supplemental order on March 26 that clarified that stricter restrictions put into place by local governing bodies were allowed.[14]

On April 1, an additional executive order was issued by the Governor, announcing a state-wide shelter-in-place order, requiring all non-essential businesses to close and overrides previous allowances for dine-in services in restaurants made in the March 24 executive order.[15]

State health officer Dr. Thomas Dobbs stated during a news conference on April 1 that MSDH is not releasing to the public the number of ventilators available and the number of healthcare workers infected with COVID-19, despite confirming that MSDH does have this information, citing the potential for fear and confusion, despite other states, like Louisiana, providing these numbers.[16]

On April 17, the Governor extended the state's shelter-in-place by an additional week, April 27, 2020.[17] With the extension, changes were also made to the shelter-in-place, allowing Coast beaches and state lakes to reopen for recreation. Additionally, nonessential businesses could resume sales, but only through curbside pickup or delivery. All other requirements of the shelter-in-place remain.[citation needed]

On April 27, the Governor reopened retail businesses, and elective dental and medical procedures resumed. However, on May 2, the governor postponed plans to reopen the economy after 397 new cases were confirmed, the largest increase Mississippi had experienced.[18]

Impact on sports[edit]

On March 12, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[19] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[20]

Statistics[edit]

County [a] Cases [b][c] Deaths [c] Recov. [c][d] Pop (2011) cases/100k Ref.
81 / 82 13458 635 9401 2,967,297 453.54
Adams 188 15 32,297 582.10
Alcorn 14 1 37,057 37.78
Amite 52 1 13,131 396.01
Attala 273 14 19,564 1395.42
Benton 15 0 8,729 171.84
Bolivar 141 11 34,145 412.94
Calhoun 60 4 14,962 401.02
Carroll 113 10 10,597 1066.34
Chickasaw 127 12 17,392 730.22
Choctaw 32 2 8,547 374.4
Claiborne 58 2 9,604 603.92
Clarke 131 16 16,732 782.93
Clay 99 3 20,634 479.79
Coahoma 106 3 26,151 405.34
Copiah 284 4 29,449 964.38
Covington 131 1 19,568 669.46
DeSoto 474 6 161,252 293.95
Forrest 486 35 74,934 648.57
Franklin 25 2 8,118 307.96
George 20 1 22,578 88.58
Greene 7 1 14,400 48.61
Grenada 75 2 21,906 342.37
Hancock 88 11 43,929 200.32
Harrison 237 6 187,105 126.67
Hinds 898 24 245,285 366.10
Holmes 369 23 19,198 1922.08
Humphreys 53 7 9,375 565.33
Issaquena 0 0 1,406 0.00
Itawamba 85 7 23,401 363.23
Jackson 296 13 139,668 211.93
Jasper 145 3 17,062 849.84
Jefferson 40 0 7,726 517.73
Jefferson Davis 71 2 12,487 568.59
Jones 492 15 67,761 726.08
Kemper 127 10 10,456 1214.61
Lafayette 124 3 47,351 261.87
Lamar 220 5 55,658 395.27
Lauderdale 680 56 80,261 847.24
Lawrence 94 1 12,929 727.05
Leake 388 10 23,805 1629.91
Lee 108 5 82,910 130.26
Leflore 241 26 32,317 745.74
Lincoln 245 20 34,869 702.63
Lowndes 164 7 59,779 274.34
Madison 653 21 95,203 685.90
Marion 110 8 27,088 406.08
Marshall 71 3 37,144 191.15
Monroe 246 24 36,989 665.06
Montgomery 80 1 10,925 732.27
Neshoba 514 31 29,676 1732.04
Newton 227 3 21,720 1045.12
Noxubee 165 6 11,545 1429.19
Oktibbeha 139 10 47,671 291.58
Panola 62 2 34,707 178.64
Pearl River 205 27 55,834 367.16
Perry 49 2 12,250 400
Pike 200 11 40,404 495
Pontotoc 26 3 29,957 86.79
Prentiss 39 3 25,276 154.3
Quitman 24 0 8,223 291.86
Rankin 356 6 141,617 251.38
Scott 592 10 28,264 2094.54
Sharkey 7 0 4,916 142.39
Simpson 85 0 27,503 309.06
Smith 131 10 16,491 794.37
Stone 30 0 17,786 168.67
Sunflower 79 3 29,450 268.25
Tallahatchie 24 1 15,378 156.07
Tate 69 1 28,886 238.87
Tippah 70 11 22,232 314.86
Tishomingo 25 0 19,593 127.60
Tunica 48 3 10,778 445.35
Union 72 5 27,134 265.35
Walthall 49 0 15,443 317.30
Warren 154 7 48,773 315.75
Washington 153 5 51,137 299.20
Wayne 125 0 20,747 602.50
Webster 28 1 10,253 273.09
Wilkinson 84 9 9.878 214.57
Winston 98 1 19,198 510.47
Yalobusha 84 5 12,678 662.57
Yazoo 219 2 28,065 780.33
Updated May 25, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Mississippi State Department of Health[21]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case was diagnosed. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed case. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ a b c "–" denotes that no data is currently available for that county, not that the value is zero.
  4. ^ MSDH is not providing recovered case numbers by county. Local health departments could be providing this information at their discretion.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "First Case of Coronavirus in Mississippi". March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  2. ^ Matlock, Cash (March 15, 2020). "10 CORONAVIRUS CASES REPORTED IN MISSISSIPPI". WCBI-TV. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  3. ^ Keiek, Brantly (March 16, 2020). "CORONAVIRUS: TWO CASES OF COVID-19 IN PEARL RIVER COUNTY, ONE IN HANCOCK COUNTY". WXXV-TV. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  4. ^ Lee, China (March 19, 2020). "HEALTH DEPARTMENT CONFIRMS MISSISSIPPI'S FIRST CORONAVIRUS DEATH". wlbt.tv. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  5. ^ WLBT.com Staff (March 13, 2020). "CASES CORONAVIRUS IDENTIFIED BY MISS DEPT HEALTH". wmcactionnews5. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  6. ^ Burnett, Jayson (March 21, 2020). "MISSISSIPPI CORONAVIRUS CASES UP TO 140". djournal. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  7. ^ Fowler, Sarah (March 22, 2020). "CORONAVIRUS CASES INCREASE TO 207 IN MISSISSIPPI". MSN News. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Broom, Brian (March 14, 2020). "Mississippi declares state of emergency over coronavirus as Louisiana hard hit". Clarion Ledger. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  9. ^ Lee, China (March 15, 2020). "Jackson mayor to declare civil emergency amid coronavirus outbreak". WLBT. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  10. ^ Sydney Darden/Craig Ford (March 21, 2020). "Tupelo now under stay-at-home order to prevent coronavirus spread". WVTA. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  11. ^ Carlisle, Zac (March 21, 2020). "Columbus implements curfew and restrictions on businesses, other gatherings". WVTA. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  12. ^ "Gov. Tate Reeves Signs New Executive Order in Response to COVID-19 Spread". Jackson Free Press. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  13. ^ Ganusheau, Adam. "Mayors scramble to know: Does Gov. Reeves' coronavirus declaration clash with local orders?". Biloxi Sun Herald. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  14. ^ Cook, Cathy (March 28, 2020). "Clarifications on conflicting executive orders". Picayune Item. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  15. ^ Ladd, Donna; Judin, Nick. "Governor Does About-Face, Issues Statewide 'Shelter In Place' For Mississippi". Jackson Free Press. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  16. ^ LeMaster, C.J. "MSDH keeps some details on Mississippi's health care readiness, capabilities from public". WLOX. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  17. ^ Lee, Anita; Walck, Lauren. "Gov. Reeves extends Mississippi's shelter-in-place order. But there are a few changes". SunHerald. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  18. ^ https://abcnews.go.com/US/mississippi-governor-reconsiders-reopening-state-largest-spike-covid/story?id=70470830
  19. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships NCAA, March 12, 2020
  20. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak MLive.com, March 16, 2020
  21. ^ "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)". Mississippi State Department of Health. Retrieved May 2, 2020.

External links[edit]