COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon

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COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon
COVID-19 Cases in Oregon by counties.svg
Cases by county in Oregon (as of May 26)
  1,001 or more confirmed cases
  101-1000 confirmed cases
  11-100 confirmed cases
  1–10 confirmed cases
COVID-19 Cases in Oregon by counties per capita.svg
Cases per 100,000 residents by county in Oregon (as of May 26)
  101+ confirmed cases
  51–100 confirmed cases
  26–50 confirmed cases
  1–25 confirmed cases
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationOregon
Index caseWashington County
Arrival dateFebruary 28, 2020
Confirmed cases3,967[1]
Hospitalized cases752 (cumulative)
149 (suspected and confirmed)
53 (confirmed only)[1]
Critical cases40 (suspected and confirmed)
24 (confirmed only)[1]
Ventilator cases17 (suspected and confirmed)
13 (confirmed only)[1]
Deaths
148[1]
Government website
govstatus.egov.com/OR-OHA-COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Oregon on February 28, 2020.

Timeline[edit]

COVID-19 cases in Oregon, United States  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases and recoveries

Feb Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr May May Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
deaths
2020-02-28
1(0)
2020-02-29
1(+0%) 0
2020-03-01
2(+100%) 0
2020-03-02
3(+50%) 0
2020-03-03
3(+0%) 0
2020-03-04
3(+0%) 0
2020-03-05
3(+0%) 0
2020-03-06
3(+0%) 0
2020-03-07
7(+133%) 0
2020-03-08
14(+100%) 0
2020-03-09
14(+0%) 0
2020-03-10
15(+7%) 0
2020-03-11
21(+40%) 0
2020-03-12
22(+5%) 0
2020-03-13
30(+36%) 0
2020-03-14
36(+20%) 1
2020-03-15
39(+8%) 1
2020-03-16
47(+21%) 1
2020-03-17
65(+38%) 1
2020-03-18
75(+15%) 3
2020-03-19
88(+17%) 3
2020-03-20
114(+30%) 3
2020-03-21
137(+20%) 4
2020-03-22
161(+18%) 5
2020-03-23
191(+19%) 5
2020-03-24
209(+9%) 8
2020-03-25
266(+27%) 10
2020-03-26
316(+19%) 11
2020-03-27
414(+31%) 12
2020-03-28
479(+16%) 13
2020-03-29
548(+14%) 13
2020-03-30
606(+11%) 16
2020-03-31
690(+14%) 18
2020-04-01
736(+7%) 19
2020-04-02
826(+12%) 21
2020-04-03
899(+9%) 22
2020-04-04
999(+11%) 26
2020-04-05
1,068(+7%) 27
2020-04-06
1,132(+6%) 29
2020-04-07
1,181(+4%) 33
2020-04-08
1,239(+5%) 38
2020-04-09
1,321(+7%) 44
2020-04-10
1,371(+4%) 48
2020-04-11
1,447(+6%) 51
2020-04-12
1,527(+6%) 52
2020-04-13
1,584(+4%) 53
2020-04-14
1,633(+3%) 55
2020-04-15
1,663(+2%) 58
2020-04-16
1,736(+4%) 64
2020-04-17
1,780(+3%) 70
2020-04-18
1,844(+3%) 72
2020-04-19
1,910(+4%) 74
2020-04-20
1,956(+2%) 75
2020-04-21
2,002(+2%) 78
2020-04-22
2,059(+3%) 78
2020-04-23
2,127(+3%) 83
2020-04-24
2,177(+2%) 86
2020-04-25
2,253(+3%) 87
2020-04-26
2,311(+3%) 91
2020-04-27
2,354(+2%) 92
2020-04-28
2,385(+1%) 99
2020-04-29
2,446(+3%) 101
2020-04-30
2,510(+3%) 103
2020-05-01
2,579(+3%) 104
2020-05-02
2,635(+2%) 109
2020-05-03
2,680(+2%) 109
2020-05-04
2,759(+3%) 109
2020-05-05
2,839(+3%) 113
2020-05-06
2,916(+3%) 115
2020-05-07
2,989(+3%) 121
2020-05-08
3,068(+3%) 124
2020-05-09
3,160(+3%) 127
2020-05-10
3,228(+2%) 127
2020-05-11
3,286(+2%) 130
2020-05-12
3,358(+2%) 130
2020-05-13
3,416(+1.7%) 134
2020-05-14
3,479(+1.8%) 137
2020-05-15
3,541(+1.8%) 137
2020-05-16
3,612(+2.0%) 137
2020-05-17
3,623(+0.3%) 137
2020-05-18
3,687(+1.8%) 138
2020-05-19
3,726(+1.1%) 140
2020-05-20
3,801(+2.0%) 144
2020-05-21
3,817(+0.4%) 145
2020-05-22
3,864(+1.2%) 147
2020-05-23
3,888(+0.6%) 147
2020-05-24
3,927(+1.0%) 148
2020-05-25
3,949(+0.6%) 148
2020-05-26
3,967(+0.5%) 148
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Oregon.
Sources: Oregon Heath Authority, Oregon COVID-19 Public Health Indicators

On February 28, 2020, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported the first case of suspected coronavirus in a resident of Washington County who had not traveled to an infected area, likely indicating that the virus had been contracted within the community.[2] Because he was identified as an employee at Forest Hills Elementary School in the Lake Oswego School District in adjacent Clackamas County, the school was closed for three days for deep cleaning.[2][3] The case was confirmed as coronavirus by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on March 3.[4] On March 1, Oregon confirmed its second case, a household contact of its first case.[5] The employee, later identified as the school building engineer, was treated with Remdesivir and was released from the hospital more than two months later.[3]

On March 7, health officials identified four new presumptive positive cases among residents in Jackson, Klamath, and Washington counties.[6] On March 8, the OHA added 7 new presumptive positive cases to Oregon's count.[7] On March 10, the OHA announced Multnomah County's first presumptive positive case, bringing Oregon's total to fifteen cases in seven counties.[8] On March 11, OHA confirmed four new cases, one new case each in Deschutes, Marion, Polk, and Umatilla counties.[9] They later announced Linn County's first two presumptive positive cases.[10]

On March 16, Providence Health Systems, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, and Oregon Health & Science University formed a coalition to set up a regional health system in the state in order to address anticipated need for capacity and coordination to address the outbreak.[11]

Amid coronavirus outbreaks at nursing homes, including those run by Avamere, the company donated $20,000 to a PAC tied to Oregon governor Kate Brown.[12]

42-year-old Vladislav V. Drozdek was arrested on March 23 trying to sell stolen N95 hospital masks in Beaverton. The masks were donated to local hospitals.[13]

Cases[edit]

An outbreak occurred at the 154-bed Edward C. Allworth Veterans' Home in Lebanon, Linn County. By March 16, the virus was confirmed in 13 residents (most over age 70) and one healthcare worker. With 151 residents and 225 workers, the county health director said, "I can't stop it. I can't stop the virus. I can't make test kits appear", but there was some optimism that the spread would be slow since the retirement home is divided into eleven housing units with 14 residents each. In 2016, the average resident age was 85, with an average length of stay being 50 days.[14][15][16][17][18]

In Portland, Healthcare at Foster Creek (operating as St. Jude Operating Company with Melchor Balaz as its registered agent, part of Benicia Senior Living), had 119 cases and 29 deaths by mid-May. The facility's first case was reported on March 24. An employee reported a lack of PPE to Oregon OSHA on March 26, though a Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) investigation found it was "unsubstantiated for violations". Five deaths were reported in the week following the complaint. DHS and the facility agreed to a Letter of Intent for assistance on staffing and PPE, and the two signed with American Medical Response to assess and transport residents. DHS conducted a 3-day inspection beginning April 12; the facility had 10 deaths by then. On April 15, the inspection reported they "failed to ensure appropriate measures .. to prevent the spread of COVID-19", and that it "presents an immediate risk" to the patients and staff. DHS revoked new admissions at the facility, appointed a temporary management consultant, and inspected the facility daily. By April 16, there had been 50 cases and 14 deaths. On April 18, Oregon's Office of Emergency Management issued a partial evacuation order. DHS conducted a second significant survey of the facility beginning on April 24, and on April 28 CMS issued a "notice of involuntary termination" if the facility didn't correct its operating conditions by May 17. DHS had reports that coronavirus-positive staff were working in the facility, though not directly with patients. By May 5, there were 117 cases and 28 deaths; 55 patients had been sent to the hospital. Their fatalities were over half of all coronavirus fatalities in Portland. The facility's license was suspended on that date, effective immediately, meaning the facility was closed and the remaining 11 residents were evacuated by DHS.[19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28]

Also in Portland, Laurelhurst Village, part of Avamere, reported 48 cases with 4 deaths by May 12, up from 38 cases and 4 deaths by April 14. The cluster was publicized by The Oregonian on April 3, as DHS refused to publish counts until mid-April. On April 3 The Oregonian was able to find 14 residents and 15 staff confirmed with COVID-19. On April 9, the facility opened 47 beds for coronavirus patients who have been released from a hospital as part of a Oregon Department of Human Services contract through the state. At least one complaint had been filed to OSHA on April 6.[19][12][20][29]

Villiage Healthcare in Gresham had 36 cases and two deaths by April 30. Several staff complaints had been filed with OSHA.[20]

Another large outbreak was at Salem's Prestige Senior Living Orchard Heights assisted living facility, having at least 41 cases and three deaths by May 12. The first case had been confirmed on April 30.[30]

Salem Transitional Care, also part of Avamere, had 26 cases and three deaths by May 12, up from 5 cases and one death by April 14. The facility is licensed for 80 beds.[19][12]

Incidents by day[edit]

Lines show trend using a five-day average.
Date New Cases Total Cases New Deaths Total Deaths Doubling time of cases in days Notes
Feb 28 1 1 0 0 Washington County (1)[31]
Feb 29 0 1 0 0
Mar 1 1 2 0 0 Washington County(1)[32]
Mar 2 1 3 0 0 Umatilla County resident hospitalized in Walla Walla, WA.[33]
Mar 3 0 3 0 0
Mar 4 0 3 0 0
Mar 5 0 3 0 0
Mar 6 0 3 0 0
Mar 7 4 7 0 0 Jackson (2), Klamath (1), Washington (1) counties.[34][35]
Mar 8 7 14 0 0 1 Douglas (1), Marion(1), Washington (5) counties.[36]
Mar 9 0 14 0 0
Mar 10 1 15 0 0 Multnomah County (1)[37]
Mar 11 6 21 0 0 Deschutes (1),Polk(1), Marion (1), Umatilla(1) counties.;[38] 2 Linn Co.[39]
Mar 12 3 22 0 0 Clackamas(1), Washington(2) counties.[40]
Mar 13 6 30 0 0 2.2 Linn County (6) announced as of 8:13 pm. March 12.[41]
Mar 14 6 36 1 1 3.8 Deschutes(2), Linn(1), Washington(3) counties.[42] 70-year-old man at VA Hospital in Multnomah Co.[43]
Mar 15 3 39 0 1 8.7 Deschutes(1), Linn(1), Yamhill(1) counties.[44]
Mar 16 8 47 0 1' 3.7 Benton (2), Clackamas(1), Deschutes(2), Marion(1), Multnomah(1), Washington(1) counties.[45]
Mar 17 18 65 0 1 2.1 Clackamas (4), Linn (5), Marion (1), Multnomah (1) and Washington(7) counties.[46]
Mar 18 10 75 2 3 4.8 Benton (1), Lane (2), Marion (4), Washington, (2) and Yamhill (1) counties. 60-year-old woman from Lane County, dies Mar 14, confirmed positive for virus Mar 18[47] 71-year-old man died at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center (Washington County resident) on March 17. Both of deceased had underlying medical conditions.[48]
Mar 19 13 88 0 3 4.3 Linn(2), Marion(5), Multnomah(4) and Washington(2) counties.[49]
Mar 20 26 114 0 3 2.7 Clackamas(4), Deschutes(2), Grant(1), Linn(1), Marion(4), Multnomah(5), Union(1), Washington(6), Yamhill(2) counties.[50]
Mar 21 23 137 1 4 3.8 Clackamas(1), Deschutes(1), Josephine(1), Lane(1), Marion(2), Multnomah(6), Washington(11) counties. 72 year old Marion County woman died March 20 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.[51]
Mar 22 24 161 1 5 4.3 Death of man in 90s at Allworth Veterans' Home, had tested positive on Mar 11.
Mar 23 30 191 0 5
Mar 24 18 209 3 8 Deaths: a 78-year-old Clackamas County man with underlying medical condition who died at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center on Sunday; a 63-year-old Multnomah County man who had underlying medical conditions and died at home Monday; and a 90-year-old Washington County woman with underlying medical conditions who died Monday at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center.[52]
Mar 25 57 266 2 10 Deaths: an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County who had underlying medical conditions, according to OHA. The state's 10th dead was a 73-year-old woman in Marion County who also had underlying medical conditions.[53]
Mar 26 50 316 1 11 Death: a 69-year-old woman in Washington County. She had underlying medical conditions.[54]
Mar 27 98 414 1 12 Death: an 82-year-old woman in Marion County who had underlying health conditions.[55]
Mar 28 65 479 1 13 Death: an 93-year-old man in Yamhill County who had underlying health conditions.[56]
Mar 29 69 548 0 13
Mar 30 58 606 3 16 Deaths: all people with underlying health conditions over the age of 80. They were residents of Yamhill, Clackamas and Linn counties. The case in Linn county was a resident of the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon.[57]
Mar 31 84 690 2 18 Deaths: a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County and an 88-year-old woman in Benton County. Both people had underlying medical conditions.[58]
Apr 1 46 736 1 19 Death: a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County with underlying medical conditions.[59]
Apr 2 90 826 2 21 Deaths: a 61-year-old man in Washington County and a 91-year-old woman in Marion County. Both people had underlying medical conditions.[60]
Apr 3 73 899 1 22 Death: a 71-year-old man in Polk County who had underlying medical conditions.[61]
Apr 4 100 999 4 26 Deaths: Three of the deaths were Multnomah County residents with underlying medical conditions, OHA said. They include a 59-year-old man, a 77-year-old woman and a 64-year-old woman. The fourth death was a 65-year-old Marion County man who also had underlying medical conditions.[62]
Apr 5 69 1,068 1 27 Death: a 62-year-old Multnomah County woman tested positive on April 2 and died the same day in her residence.[63]
Apr 6 64 1,132 2 29 Deaths: a 93-year-old male in Washington County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 4, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center and a 70-year-old female in Marion county, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 2, in her residence. They both had underlying medical conditions.[64]
Apr 7 49 1,181 4 33 Deaths: an 83-year-old female in Marion County, a 98-year-old female in Marion County, a 71-year-old female in Marion County and a 91-year-old female in Washington County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[65]
Apr 8 58 1,239 5 38 Deaths: an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County, a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, a 94-year-old man in Yamhill County and a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[66]
Apr 9 82 1,321 6 44 Deaths: a 74-year-old man in Linn County, a 97-year-old man in Linn County, an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County, a 41-year-old woman in Multnomah County, a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 74-year-old man in Benton County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[67]
Apr 10 51 1,371 4 48 Deaths: a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County, an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County. They all had underlying medical conditions.
Apr 11 76 1,447 3 51 Deaths: a 94-year-old woman in Yamhill County, a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County, an 81-year-old man in Josephine County. They all had underlying conditions.[68]
Apr 12 80 1,527 1 52 Death: an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County. She had underlying conditions.[69]
Apr 13 57 1,584 1 53 Death: a 66-year-old Washington County resident. She had underlying medical conditions.[70]
Apr 14 49 1,633 2 55 Deaths: a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County and an 88-year-old woman in Benton County. They both had had underlying medical conditions.[71]
Apr 15 30 1,663 3 58 Deaths: an 82-year-old man in Marion County, an 84-year-old woman in Multnomah County and a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[72]
Apr 16 73 1,736 6 64 Deaths: an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 56-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 74-year-old woman in Benton County and a 92-year-old man in Marion County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[73]
Apr 17 49 1,785 6 70 Deaths: an 88-year-old woman in Clackamas County, a 95-year-old man in Linn County, an 86-year-old man in Linn County, a 65-year-old woman in Marion County, a 91-year-old woman in Marion County and a 76-year-old woman in Multnomah County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[74]
Apr 18 59 1,844 2 72 Deaths: a 62-year-old man in Clackamas County and an 84-year-old man in Marion County. They both had underlying medical conditions.[75]
Apr 19 66 1,910 2 74 Deaths: a 64-year-old man in Benton County and a 68-year-old man in Washington County. They both had underlying medical conditions.[76]
Apr 20 47 1,956 1 75 Death: a 45-year-old man in Marion County, he had underlying medical conditions.[77]
Apr 21 46 2,002 3 78 Deaths: a 47-year-old man in Washington County, a 61-year-old woman in Washington County and a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[78]
Apr 22 57 2,059 0 78 Deaths: None[79]
Apr 23 68 2,127 5 83 Deaths: a 94-year-old female in Multnomah County, a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, an 87-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 70-year-old man in Clackamas County. The all had underlying medical conditions.[80]
Apr 24 50 2,177 3 86 Deaths: an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County, an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County and an 89-year-old man in Linn County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[81]
Apr 25 76 2,253 1 87 Death: a 59-year-old man in Lane County. He had underlying medical conditions.[82]
Apr 26 58 2,311 4 91 Deaths: a 51-year-old man in Wasco County, a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County and a 93-year-old woman in Marion County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[83]
Apr 27 43 2,354 1 92 Death: a 91-year-old female in Washington County. She had underlying medical conditions.[84]
Apr 28 31 2,385 7 99 Deaths: a 93-year-old female in Clackamas County, a 73-year-old man in Marion County, a 92-year-old man in Marion County, a 93-year-old female in Multnomah County, a 69-year-old female in Multnomah County, a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 91-year-old man in Yamhill County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[85]
Apr 29 61 2,446 2 101 Deaths: a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 71-year-old female in Multnomah County. They both had underlying medical conditions.[86]
Apr 30 64 2,510 2 103 Deaths: a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 77-year-old man in Marion County. They both had underlying medical conditions.[87]
May 1 69 2,579 1 104 Death: a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County. He had underlying medical conditions.[88]
May 2 56 2,635 5 109 Deaths: a 64-year-old man from Polk County, a 70-year-old man from Multnomah County, a 75-year-old man from Multnomah County, a 91-year-old woman from Marion County and a 76-year-old woman from Umatilla County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[89]
May 3 45 2,680 0 109 Death: None[90]
May 4 79* 2,759 0 109 Death: None[91] *Includes 14 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.
May 5 80* 2,839 4 113 Deaths: an 89-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County, who all had underlying medical conditions. Also a 76-year-old man in Washington County. He had no known underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 8 presumptive cases without confirmed tests. [92]
May 6 77* 2,916 2 115 Deaths: an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 95-year-old man in Polk County. They both had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 7 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[93]
May 7 73* 2,989 6 121 Deaths: an 84-year-old woman in Clackamas County, a 62-year-old man in Marion County, an 82-year-old woman in Marion County, an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County and a 69-year-old woman in Polk County. They all had had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 3 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[94]
May 8 79* 3,068 3 124 Deaths: a 51-year-old man in Marion County, an 80-year-old woman in Marion County and a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County. They all had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 5 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[95]
May 9 92* 3,160 3 127 Deaths: a 76-year-old woman in Clackamas County, an 81-year-old man in Linn County and a 92-year-old woman in Polk County. They all had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 13 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[96]
May 10 68* 3,228 0 127 Deaths: none. *Includes an additional 8 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[97]
May 11 58* 3,286 3 130 Deaths: a 91-year-old man in Polk County. He had underlying medical conditions. A 64-year-old man in Umatilla County. It is unknown at this time if he had underlying medical conditions. A 77-year-old woman in Washington County. She had no known underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 7 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[98]
May 12 72* 3,358 0 130 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 11 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[99]
May 13 58* 3,416 4 134 Deaths: a 91-year-old man in Polk County, a 100-year-old woman in Polk County, a 90-year-old woman in Polk County and a 91-year-old woman in Washington County. They all had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 4 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[100]
May 14 63 3,479 3 137 Deaths: a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, a 61-year-old man in Multnomah County and a 66-year-old man in Washington County. They all had underlying medical conditions.[101]
May 15 62* 3,541 0 137 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 1 presumptive case without confirmed tests.[102]
May 16 71* 3,612 0 137 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 7 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[103]
May 17 12* 3,623 0 137 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 3 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[104]
May 18 64* 3,687 1 138 Deaths: a 69-year-old man in Marion County. He had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 2 presumptive cases without confirmed tests.[105]
May 19 39* 3,726 2 140 Deaths: a 70-year-old woman in Umatilla County and a 69-year-old man in Linn County. They both had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 8 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes two previous presumptive cases that were found not to be COVID-19.[106]
May 20 75* 3,801 4 144 Deaths: a 94-year-old woman in Washington County, a 90-year-old man in Washington County, a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County and a 58-year-old woman in Multnomah County. They all had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 10 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes two previous presumptive cases that were found not to be COVID-19.[107]
May 21 24 3,817 1 145 Death: a 93-year-old woman in Polk County. She had underlying medical conditions. There were consolidations to previous numbers as some previously presumptive cases were found not to be COVID-19.[108]
May 22 47* 3,864 2 147 Deaths: a 53-year-old man in Marion County and an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County. They both had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 3 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes one previous presumptive case that was found not to be COVID-19.[109]
May 23 35* 3,888 0 147 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 7 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes 3 previous cases that were found not to be COVID-19. Note that this entry only reflects a 16 hour period instead of the normal 24. The reporting deadline has changed from 8:00 AM to 12:01 AM.[110]
May 24 46* 3,927 1 148 Deaths: a 93-year-old woman in Clackamas County. She had underlying medical conditions. *Includes an additional 3 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes some previous cases that were found not to be COVID-19.[111]
May 25 23* 3,949 0 148 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 4 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes a previous case that was found not to be COVID-19.[112]
May 26 18* 3,967 0 148 Deaths: None. *Includes an additional 1 presumptive cases without confirmed tests and removes a previous case that was found not to be COVID-19.[113]

Government response[edit]

Coronavirus signage at Milwaukie's Spring Park

On February 28, Governor Kate Brown created a coronavirus response team "tasked with coordinating state- and local-level preparations for an epidemic" of coronavirus in Oregon. "[C]omposed of directors or other representatives of 12 state agencies," the response team will "keep the governor posted on the coronavirus situation internationally and give her advice on how to protect the public."[114] She later ordered the cancellation of events for 250 or more people.[115]

The Oregon Medical Station is a 250-bed emergency hospital being built to treat patients of coronavirus disease 2019 at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem.[116][117][118]

After growing calls from local officials, Governor Brown issued a statewide stay-at-home order on March 23 effective immediately with class C misdemeanor charges for violators.[119]

On March 15, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) which enforces the Oregon Bottle Bill suspended the enforcement until June 1, so grocers can focus on restocking, sanitation and social distancing management.[120][121] The exemption was originally given from March 15 to March 31, however due to continuing social distancing and staffing concerns, it has been extended until April 30, [122] and again until June 1[120]

Signage at a gas pump in Portland showing temporary self-serve

On March 28, Oregon temporarily lifted the prohibition on self-pump at gas stations to ensure fuel is available during staffing issues related to the pandemic.[123] Stations are allowed to let consumers pump their own gas through May 23, after the end date was extended from May 9.[124]

On April 9, Gov. Brown announced that Abbott ID NOW rapid testing machines were being sent to three rural hospitals: Curry General Hospital in Gold Beach, Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Heppner, and Lake District Hospital in Lakeview. Fifteen machines were sent to each state from HHS; the destinations of the other 12 machines were not given. Only 120 individual test kits were sent, delaying their widespread use.[125][126]

On April 13, Gov. Brown, together with California governor Gavin Newsom and Washington governor Jay Inslee, announced the Western States Pact, an agreement to coordinate among the three states to restart economic activity while controlling the outbreak.[127]

On April 28, City Government of Portland, Oregon announced it will be closing some streets to through traffic to encourage distancing;[128] however, the city has suspended the abatement of transient camps during the pandemic.[129] City spokesperson Heather Hafer stated " forcing them to move would pose a public health and safety risk." A business owner interviewed by KATU found this ironic.[129]

On May 2, Governor Brown extended the stay-at-home order, originally set to expire on May 7, to July 6.[130] On May 14, Brown announced that 31 of Oregon's 36 counties had met OHA requirements to enter the first phase of a three-phase process to reopen businesses, beginning with bars, restaurants, and personal services such as hair salons.[131]

On May 18, Baker County Circuit Judge Matthew B. Shirtcliff overturned Governor Brown's stay-at-home order, ruling that Oregon law limited executive orders for public health emergencies to 28 days.[132] Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum appealed the ruling the Oregon Supreme Court, which granted a stay of Shirtcliff's order until the Court could rule.[132]

Economic impact[edit]

Empty latex glove shelves at a Rite Aid in downtown Portland

Oregon's largest employers, Columbia Sportswear, Intel, and Nike, lost market value because of stock declines.[133]

Delta Airlines reduced flights between Portland and Japan. United Airlines cut 4 of 20 flights from Portland as well as one from Eugene. Sun Country Airlines reduced flights between Portland and Honolulu, Las Vegas, and San Francisco.[133]

Portland's restaurant and event industries experienced slowdowns.[134][135] According to the Multnomah County Health Department, "some Asian-American-owned businesses in the Jade District around Southeast 82nd Avenue had reported a drop in business 'because of the myths surrounding COVID-19.'"[136][137] At least two conventions have been cancelled.[133] Oregon businesswoman Erika Polmar led local and national efforts to lobby local, state, and federal governments for relief for small food-related businesses in the Northwest and the US.[138][139][140] She was a founding member and leadership team member of the Independent Restaurant Coalition.[138][141][142]

Multnomah County Library closed all library branches. The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry and Portland Art Museum also closed, and City Club of Portland began hosting activities online.[143] The Hollywood Theatre is closed until April 8,[144] and the Tillamook Creamery has been closed temporarily.[145]

Cannabis dispensaries were given permission to convert to curbside pickup operations by the OLCC . Medical cannabis patients were allowed to purchase up to 24 ounces per day, limited to 32 ounces per month. Cannabis sales increased during the first half of March; sales were 25–30 percent higher than for the same period of time in 2019.[146] The American Herbal Products Association's Hemp-CBD Congress, scheduled to be held in Portland in April, was cancelled.[147]

School closures[edit]

Oregon State University, Portland State University, the University of Oregon, and University of Portland all moved to online classes.[148][149][150] Reed College, Lewis & Clark College, Linfield College, and Willamette University did as well.[151][152]

On March 12, Governor Brown ordered all K–12 schools closed statewide from March 16 to March 31, 2020.[153] Just five days later, Brown extended the closure through April 28.[154]

KinderCare, a nationwide preschool provider based in Portland, closed approximately 1100 of their 1500 centers, leaving the centers that have large proportions of first responders and healthcare workers.[155]

On March 20, 2020, a worker at a Hillsboro Touchstone preschool, part of the Spring Education Group of for-profit private schools, tested positive for COVID-19. The preschool was closed for a deep cleaning and planned to remain closed for 14 days.[156]

Event cancellations[edit]

PAC-12 and Oregon State University Athletics banned participants from events, in effect March 14.[157]

Impact on sports[edit]

Notice posted at Providence Park indicating the stadium's closure to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus

On March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days, affecting the Portland Trail Blazers.[158] During the same day, Major League Soccer announced the league would be suspended for at least 30 days, affecting the Portland Timbers.[159] On March 19, MLS extended the suspension until at least May 19, 2020.[160] On March 12, Portland Thorns FC announced that their pre-season tournament, scheduled to begin March 29, was cancelled, and on April 4 the National Women's Soccer League cancelled training and games for all teams through May 5.[161]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[162] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[163]

Statistics[edit]

County [a] Cases [b][c] Deaths [c] Recov. [c][d] Pop.[e] Cases / 100k Ref.
33 / 36 3967 148 4,217,737 94.1
Baker 1 0 16,124 6.2
Benton 55 5 93,053 59.1
Clackamas 296 10 418,187 70.8
Clatsop 45 0 40,224 111.9
Columbia 16 0 52,354 30.6
Coos 31 0 64,487 48.1
Crook 6 0 24,404 24.6
Curry 6 0 22,925 26.2
Deschutes 120 0 197,692 60.7
Douglas 25 0 110,980 22.5
Gilliam 0 0 1,912 0
Grant 1 0 7,199 13.9
Harney 1 0 7,393 13.5
Hood River 12 0 23,382 51.3
Jackson 60 0 220,944 27.2
Jefferson 24 0 24,658 97.3
Josephine 25 1 87,487 28.6
Klamath 41 0 68,238 60.1
Lake 0 0 7,869 0
Lane 67 2 382,067 17.5
Lincoln 9 0 49,962 18.0
Linn 115 9 129,749 88.6
Malheur 28 0 30,571 91.6
Marion 914 25 347,818 262.8
Morrow 12 0 11,603 103.4
Multnomah 1,052 58 812,855 129.4
Polk 96 10 86,085 111.5
Sherman 1 0 1,780 56.2
Tillamook 6 0 27,036 22.2
Umatilla 112 3 77,950 143.7
Union 6 0 26,835 22.4
Wallowa 2 0 7,208 27.7
Wasco 18 1 26,682 67.5
Washington 698 17 601,592 116.0
Wheeler 0 0 1,332 0
Yamhill 66 7 107,100 61.6
Updated May 26, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Oregon Health Authority[164][165]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case was diagnosed. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed case. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ a b c "–" denotes that no data is currently available for that county, not that the value is zero.
  4. ^ OHA is not providing recovered case numbers. Local health departments could be providing this information at their discretion.
  5. ^ 2019 population estimate from "U.S. Census Bureau Quick Facts: Oregon". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2020.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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