COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa
Covid-19 cases in South Africa.svg
Confirmed cases by province (as of 3 August 2020)
Covid-19 deaths in South Africa.svg
COVID-19 related deaths by province (as of 3 August 2020)
Covid-19 recoveries in South Africa.svg
Confirmed recoveries by province (as of 3 August 2020)
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationSouth Africa
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseHilton, KwaZulu-Natal
Arrival date1 March 2020
(5 months and 3 days ago)
Confirmed casesNegative increase 516,862 As of 3 August 2020[1]
Active casesPositive decrease150,286 As of 3 August 2020
RecoveredIncrease358,037 As of 3 August 2020[1]
Deaths
Negative increase8,539 As of 3 August 2020[1]
Fatality rate1.65%
Government website
sacoronavirus.co.za

The COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa is part of the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). On 5 March 2020, Minister of Health Zweli Mkhize confirmed the spread of the virus to South Africa, with the first known patient being a male citizen who tested positive upon his return from Italy.[2] The first death to have occurred from the disease was reported on 27 March 2020.

On 15 March, the President of South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa, declared a national state of disaster,[3] and announced measures such as immediate travel restrictions and the closure of schools from 18 March.[4] On 17 March, the National Coronavirus Command Council was established,[5] "to lead the nation's plan to contain the spread and mitigate the negative impact of the coronavirus".[5][6] On 23 March, a national lockdown was announced, starting on 26 March 2020.[7] On 21 April, a 500 billion rand stimulus was announced in response to the pandemic.[8]

Ramaphosa announced that from 1 May 2020, a gradual and phased easing of the lockdown restrictions would begin, lowering the national alert level to 4.[9] From 1 June, the national restrictions were lowered to level 3.[10]

As of 2 May 2020, the median age of those who had died was 64 years.[11] As of 3 August 2020, out of 3,058,695 tests conducted, a total of 516,862 confirmed cases, 8,539 deaths, and 358,037 recoveries have been recorded.[12]

Timeline[edit]

March 2020[edit]

COVID-19 cases in South Africa  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases

Mar Mar Apr Apr May May Jun Jun Jul Jul Aug Aug Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-05 1(n.a.)
2020-03-06 1(=)
2020-03-07 2(+100%)
2020-03-08 3(+50%)
2020-03-09 7(+133%)
2020-03-10 7(=)
2020-03-11
13(+86%)
2020-03-12
16(+23%)
2020-03-13
24(+50%)
2020-03-14
38(+58%)
2020-03-15
[a]51(+34%)
2020-03-16
62(+22%)
2020-03-17
85(+37%)
2020-03-18
116(+36%)
2020-03-19
150(+29%)
2020-03-20
202(+35%)
2020-03-21
240(+19%)
2020-03-22
274(+14%)
2020-03-23
402(+47%)
2020-03-24
554(+38%)
2020-03-25
709(+28%)
2020-03-26
927(+31%)
2020-03-27
1,170(+26%) 1(n.a.)
2020-03-28
1,187(+1.5%) 1(=)
2020-03-29
1,280(+7.8%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-30
1,326(+3.6%) 3(+50%)
2020-03-31
1,353(+2%) 5(+67%)
2020-04-01
1,380(+2%) 5(=)
2020-04-02
1,462(+5.9%) 5(=)
2020-04-03
1,505(+2.9%) 7(+40%)
2020-04-04
1,585(+5.3%) 9(+29%)
2020-04-05
1,655(+4.4%) 11(+22%)
2020-04-06
1,686(+1.9%) 12(+9.1%)
2020-04-07
1,749(+3.7%) 13(+8.3%)
2020-04-08
1,845(+5.5%) 18(+38%)
2020-04-09
1,934(+4.8%) 18(=)
2020-04-10
2,003(+3.6%) 24(+33%)
2020-04-11
2,028(+1.2%) 25(+4.2%)
2020-04-12
2,173(+7.1%) 25(=)
2020-04-13
2,272(+4.6%) 27(+8%)
2020-04-14
2,415(+6.3%) 27(=)
2020-04-15
2,506(+3.8%) 34(+26%)
2020-04-16
2,605(+4%) 48(+41%)
2020-04-17
2,783(+6.8%) 50(+4.2%)
2020-04-18
3,034(+9%) 52(+4%)
2020-04-19
3,158(+4.1%) 54(+3.8%)
2020-04-20
3,300(+4.5%) 58(+7.4%)
2020-04-21
3,465(+5%) 58(=)
2020-04-22
3,635(+4.9%) 65(+12%)
2020-04-23
3,953(+8.7%) 75(+15%)
2020-04-24
4,220(+6.8%) 79(+5.3%)
2020-04-25
4,361(+3.3%) 86(+8.9%)
2020-04-26
4,546(+4.2%) 87(+1.2%)
2020-04-27
4,793(+5.4%) 90(+3.4%)
2020-04-28
4,996(+4.2%) 93(+3.3%)
2020-04-29
5,350(+7.1%) 103(+11%)
2020-04-30
5,647(+5.6%) 103(=)
2020-05-01
5,951(+5.4%) 116(+13%)
2020-05-02
6,336(+6.5%) 123(+6%)
2020-05-03
6,783(+7.1%) 131(+6.5%)
2020-05-04
7,220(+6.4%) 138(+5.3%)
2020-05-05
7,572(+4.9%) 148(+7.2%)
2020-05-06
7,808(+3.1%) 153(+3.4%)
2020-05-07
8,232(+5.4%) 161(+5.2%)
2020-05-08
8,895(+8.1%) 178(+11%)
2020-05-09
9,420(+5.9%) 186(+4.5%)
2020-05-10
10,015(+6.3%) 194(+4.3%)
2020-05-11
10,652(+6.4%) 206(+6.2%)
2020-05-12
11,350(+6.6%) 206(=)
2020-05-13
12,074(+6.4%) 219(+6.3%)
2020-05-14
12,739(+5.5%) 238(+8.7%)
2020-05-15
13,524(+6.2%) 247(+3.8%)
2020-05-16
14,355(+6.1%) 261(+5.7%)
2020-05-17
15,515(+8.1%) 264(+1.1%)
2020-05-18
16,433(+5.9%) 286(+8.3%)
2020-05-19
17,200(+4.7%) 312(+9.1%)
2020-05-20
18,003(+4.7%) 339(+8.7%)
2020-05-21
19,137(+6.3%) 369(+8.8%)
2020-05-22
20,125(+5.2%) 397(+7.6%)
2020-05-23
21,343(+6.1%) 407(+2.5%)
2020-05-24
22,583(+5.8%) 429(+5.4%)
2020-05-25
23,615(+4.6%) 481(+12%)
2020-05-26
24,264(+2.7%) 524(+8.9%)
2020-05-27
25,937(+6.9%) 552(+5.3%)
2020-05-28
27,403(+5.7%) 577(+4.5%)
2020-05-29
29,240(+6.7%) 611(+5.9%)
2020-05-30
30,967(+5.9%) 643(+5.2%)
2020-05-31
32,683(+5.5%) 683(+6.2%)
2020-06-01
34,357(+5.1%) 705(+3.2%)
2020-06-02
35,812(+4.2%) 755(+7.1%)
2020-06-03
37,525(+4.8%) 792(+4.9%)
2020-06-04
40,792(+8.7%) 848(+7.1%)
2020-06-05
43,434(+6.5%) 908(+7.1%)
2020-06-06
45,973(+5.8%) 952(+4.8%)
2020-06-07
48,285(+5%) 998(+4.8%)
2020-06-08
50,879(+5.4%) 1,080(+8.2%)
2020-06-09
52,991(+4.2%) 1,162(+7.6%)
2020-06-10
55,421(+4.6%) 1,210(+4.1%)
2020-06-11
58,568(+5.7%) 1,284(+6.1%)
2020-06-12
61,927(+5.7%) 1,354(+5.5%)
2020-06-13
65,736(+6.2%) 1,423(+5.1%)
2020-06-14
70,038(+6.5%) 1,480(+4%)
2020-06-15
73,533(+5%) 1,568(+5.9%)
2020-06-16
76,334(+3.8%) 1,625(+3.6%)
2020-06-17
80,412(+5.3%) 1,674(+3%)
2020-06-18
83,890(+4.3%) 1,737(+3.8%)
2020-06-19
87,715(+4.6%) 1,831(+5.4%)
2020-06-20
92,681(+5.7%) 1,877(+2.5%)
2020-06-21
97,302(+5%) 1,930(+2.8%)
2020-06-22
101,590(+4.4%) 1,991(+3.2%)
2020-06-23
106,108(+4.4%) 2,102(+5.6%)
2020-06-24
111,796(+5.4%) 2,205(+4.9%)
2020-06-25
118,375(+5.9%) 2,292(+3.9%)
2020-06-26
124,590(+5.3%) 2,340(+2.1%)
2020-06-27
131,800(+5.8%) 2,413(+3.1%)
2020-06-28
138,134(+4.8%) 2,456(+1.8%)
2020-06-29
144,264(+4.4%) 2,529(+3%)
2020-06-30
151,209(+4.8%) 2,657(+5.1%)
2020-07-01
159,333(+5.4%) 2,749(+3.5%)
2020-07-02
168,061(+5.5%) 2,844(+3.5%)
2020-07-03
177,124(+5.4%) 2,952(+3.8%)
2020-07-04
187,977(+6.1%) 3,026(+2.5%)
2020-07-05
196,750(+4.7%) 3,199(+5.7%)
2020-07-06
205,721(+4.6%) 3,310(+3.5%)
2020-07-07
215,855(+4.9%) 3,502(+5.8%)
2020-07-08
224,665(+4.1%) 3,600(+2.8%)
2020-07-09
238,399(+6.1%) 3,720(+3.3%)
2020-07-10
250,687(+5.2%) 3,860(+3.8%)
2020-07-11
264,184(+5.4%) 3,971(+2.9%)
2020-07-12
276,242(+4.6%) 4,079(+2.7%)
2020-07-13
287,796(+4.2%) 4,172(+2.3%)
2020-07-14
298,292(+3.6%) 4,346(+4.2%)
2020-07-15
311,049(+4.3%) 4,453(+2.5%)
2020-07-16
324,221(+4.2%) 4,669(+4.9%)
2020-07-17
337,594(+4.1%) 4,804(+2.9%)
2020-07-18
350,879(+3.9%) 4,948(+3%)
2020-07-19
364,328(+3.8%) 5,033(+1.7%)
2020-07-20
373,628(+2.6%) 5,173(+2.8%)
2020-07-21
381,798(+2.2%) 5,368(+3.8%)
2020-07-22
394,948(+3.4%) 5,940(+11%)
2020-07-23
408,052(+3.3%) 6,093(+2.6%)
2020-07-24
421,996(+3.4%) 6,343(+4.1%)
2020-07-25
434,200(+2.9%) 6,655(+4.9%)
2020-07-26
445,433(+2.6%) 6,769(+1.7%)
2020-07-27
452,529(+1.6%) 7,067(+4.4%)
2020-07-28
459,761(+1.6%) 7,257(+2.7%)
2020-07-29
471,123(+2.5%) 7,497(+3.3%)
2020-07-30
482,169(+2.3%) 7,812(+4.2%)
2020-07-31
493,183(+2.3%) 8,005(+2.5%)
2020-08-01
503,290(+2%) 8,153(+1.8%)
2020-08-02
511,485(+1.6%) 8,366(+2.6%)
2020-08-03
516,862(+1.1%) 8,539(+2.1%)
Source: Official government website

On 1 March 2020, the first patient later confirmed with COVID-19 in South Africa, returned with his wife and 8 others from the Metropolitan City of Milan in Italy,[13] travelling via Dubai, O. R. Tambo International Airport in Kempton Park, Gauteng[14] and King Shaka International Airport in Durban to Hilton.[15] On 3 March, the patient reported with symptoms to a private general practitioner and isolated himself; the doctor isolated herself as well. On 5 March the Minister of Health, Zweli Mkhize, announced the first confirmed case, epidemiologists and clinicians from the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) were deployed to KwaZulu-Natal in response.[2][16][17] and the patient went to Grey's Hospital in Pietermaritzburg.[18]

On 7 March, it was announced that a woman from the same travel group from Italy, returning to Gauteng, also tested positive.[19]

On 11 March 6 new cases were reported, with 1 case from the same travel group from Italy, while the other 5 cases appear unrelated having travel histories to other European countries. The first case was confirmed in the Western Cape province.[20] 3 new cases were announced on 12 March, including the first case in Mpumalanga province. The first local transmission and first case in the Free State province was also announced, but withdrawn later in the day by the NICD who confirmed that the case's test result was in fact negative.[21] This brought the total cases to 16.[22][23][24]

On 15 March, the first local transmissions, not yet confirmed by government labs, were announced by President Cyril Ramaphosa.[4] and the following day, the first confirmed case from Limpopo province was announced.[25] The day thereafter, on 17 March, the first confirmed cases of local transmission were announced by government labs, 4 in Gauteng, 3 in KwaZulu-Natal, and 1 in the Western Cape.[26] On the next day, 18 March, the first confirmed case of local transmission in Mpumalanga was announced by government labs.[27]

On 19 March, the Health Minister suggested that two-thirds of the South African population could contract the virus, a prediction in line with Europe's estimates on population infection.[28]

On 20 March, the Free State province recorded seven cases, becoming the sixth of South Africa's nine provinces to be infected.[29] Of the seven cases, five were from abroad (Israel, France and Texas) who had congregated for a church gathering attended by 200 people.[30] O. R. Tambo International Airport instituted isolation of foreigners on arrival and returning them to their countries of origin.[31]

On 21 March, the confirmed number of cases reached 240 with the Eastern Cape reporting its first case, making it the seventh of the nine provinces to report a case.[32] On 23 March, a national 21-day lockdown was announced by President Ramaphosa to begin on 26 March to 16 April.[7] By 24 March all nine provinces had confirmed cases, with the first cases in the Northern Cape and North West announced.[33]

On 27 March, Mkhize announced the first confirmed death in South Africa from COVID-19.[34]

April 2020[edit]

On 1 April, researchers from the NICD and South African National Bioinformatics Institute at the University of Western Cape released the genetic sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 from a South African COVID-19 patient.[35] Pick-up trucks dispensed free hand sanitizer in Alexandra in early April.[36]

On 9 April, it was announced that South Africa's cabinet members, which include the President, Deputy President, Ministers and Deputy Ministers would donate one-third of their salaries for three months to a solidarity fund.[37]

On 9 April, the St Augustine's Hospital in Durban was shut down following a localised outbreak of over 60 confirmed cases and four COVID-19 related deaths; by then 1,845 had tested positive for the virus nationally with total 18 deaths.[38]

On 10 April, health experts were surprised at the dramatic slow-down in the daily rate of new cases over the previous two weeks, however it was feared that this slow-down may trigger complacency.[39]

On 10 April, Mkhize recommended that the general public use cloth facemasks when going out in public.[40][41]

On 12 April, there was an increase of over 145 (7.1%) cases[42] including 23 officials and 3 prisoners at the East London Correctional Centre.[43]

On 13 April, chair of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on COVID-19 Salim Abdool Karim indicated that the lockdown had been effective in delaying transmissions.[44] He also described the country's 8-stage plan to combat the coronavirus.[45] This included criteria for extending or easing the lockdown.[46]

On 14 April, the number of confirmed cases grew by 143, with 70 of the new cases being from the Eastern Cape.[47][48]

By 23 April, when President Ramaphosa again addressed the nation the total number of cases had increased to 3953. Detailed figures released by the NICD showed that in April that the number of cases had taken distinct trajectories in different provinces.[49] In the two weeks from 9 to 23 April, the cases in the coastal provinces had a very high increase – Eastern Cape cases rose 583% from a low base, KwaZulu-Natal rose 108% and Western Cape 148%. North West (67%) and Gauteng (57%) had high increases, while the other provinces had much lower increases from 6% in the Northern Cape to 23% in Limpopo (all with low absolute numbers – 106 in the Free State and under 30 in each of the other provinces).[50]

As of 27 April 2020 23:59, the median age of laboratory-confirmed cases was 38 years (interquartile range 29–51 years), and children aged <10 years accounted for 3% (156/4996).[51]

On 30 April 2020, Ramaphosa received a consignment of personal protective equipment (PPE) donated by global internet group Naspers on April 30.[52]

May 2020[edit]

On 19 May 2020, scientists advising the government estimated 475 confirmed COVID-19 deaths by the end of that month, and more than forty-thousand deaths by November.[53] They also estimated that there could be insufficient ICU beds by June or July.[53] The scientists stated that these estimates were subject to deviations and were based on simple and pessimistic assumptions.[54]

July 2020[edit]

On 12 July, in an address to the nation, President Ramaphosa announced that the anticipated surge in COVID-19 cases had arrived. The state of disaster was extended until 15 August 2020 and the alcohol ban was reintroduced along with a new curfew from 21:00 until 4:00.[55][56] Resumption of alcohol sale and distribution had led to increased pressure on hospitals from road traffic accidents, trauma and violence which happened mostly at night.[56]

On 22 July, the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) and the University of Cape Town's Centre for Actuarial Research estimated that 17,090 excess natural deaths had taken place between 6 May and 14 July 2020 in South Africa.[57][58] These represented, by the second week of July, a 59% increase in natural deaths compared to the same time period in previous years[57] 11,175 (65%) of these excess estimated natural deaths were in those above age 60 years.[57][58] Excess natural deaths were COVID-19 related either directly or indirectly through delayed diagnosis and treatment of other conditions.[58] Unnatural deaths, from car accidents and murders, were 20% lower than expected.[57]

On 23 July, President Ramaphosa announced the re-closure of all public schools for four-weeks from 27 July to 24 August and the extension of the academic year into 2021.[59]

Preparations and response[edit]

After the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared COVID-19 a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, an emergency operation centre was immediately activated.[60]

Testing[edit]

A COVID-19 testing tent at the Paarl Provincial Hospital

The National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) started testing people in South Africa for SARS-CoV-2 on 28 January 2020,[51] and by 7 February had conducted 42 such tests.[61]

By mid-March, state hospitals were offering free COVID-19 testing.[62]

On 30 March 2020, the government announced its intentions of initiating an enhanced screening and testing programme.[63] On 3 April 2020, the NICD made alterations to its testing guidelines to further allow for anyone who presented with relevant COVID-19 symptoms to be tested (previously there were additional requirements such as history of foreign travel or recent contact with a confirmed case).[64] By the start of April, 67 mobile testing units had been established and 47000 people had been tested, some in drive-through facilities.[36]

On 8 April, the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) detailed its testing capacity through the country. The NHLS would be able to perform approximately 36000 tests per day.[65]

Many private clinical pathology laboratories were also conducting tests. The CEO of the NHLS, Dr Kamy Chetty, said that by 9 April 2020 the majority of tests had been done in the private sector as the initial cases had been linked to international travellers who were likely to be on private medical aids.[66]

By 9 April 2020, South Africa had conducted 68874 tests at 1.2 tests per thousand, considerably lower than for example Turkey (3.3), the United Kingdom (3.6), and South Korea (9.7).[67] However, the ratio of positive tests to total tests conducted was significantly lower than most countries. By 10 April, the number of tests had increased to 73028, making the average number of tests per day in the first 10 days of April roughly 3300. The chair of the board of the NHLS, Eric Buch, stated that it had a capacity of 15000 tests per day and would welcome doing more tests.[66] On 12 April, Minister of Health, Dr Zweli Mkhize announced that the number of tests carried out in the previous 24 hours had increased to 5 032, with 3 192 carried out in public laboratories.[42]

On 14 April, Stavros Nicolaou, head of Business for South Africa's healthcare working group and Aspen Pharmacare executive, said that South Africa had the capacity and kits to do 25000 tests a day.[68]

By 23 April the total number of tests was 143570.[49] The number of daily tests increased: for the first 14 days of April the daily average number of tests was 3394; for the next 9 days the daily average was 6283. The rate of positive tests versus total tests remained less than 3%. The Minister of Health released figures that showed that of all the tests done up to 23 April 62% had been done in the private sector and 38% in the public sector. However, that ratio was changing as the public sector increased capacity. The public sector performed 63% of the new tests reported on 23 April 2020.[69]

By 27 April, 185497 tests had been performed on South African residents, with the public sector doing the majority of the tests. Provincial test coverage varied by over a factor of 8. The number of tests per 100000 residents (based on 2019 population estimates) was Northwest 66, Limpopo 69, Mpumalanga 101, Northern Cape 111, Eastern Cape 247, KwaZulu-Natal 270, Free State 284, Gauteng 439, and Western Cape 541 (national average 317). A surveillance programme was started to monitor community transmission (as opposed to tests done on people who displayed symptoms or who had been in contact with COVID-19 patients). In the three arms of the programme 812 tests had been done and two positive cases had been detected.[51]

By 28 June, the total number of tests was 1567084. The private sector had now overtaken the public sector, in terms of tests completed. The private sector had done 804248 test with the public sector only doing 762836.[70]

By 11 July, 2108570 had been done with the private sector still doing the most tests.[71]

Clinical trials, vaccines and treatment[edit]

On 17 March 2020, the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority announced that it would expedite review of treatments, vaccines and clinical trials.[72]

A team from 8 universities and 14 hospitals led by Helen Rees and Jeremy Nel from the University of the Witwatersrand participated in the World Health Organisation Solidarity Clinical Trials that investigated medications.[73]

A COVID-19 vaccine trial was launched in Gauteng province, towards the end of June in collaboration with the Jenner Institute in the UK.[74]

By 15 July it was reported by the BBC[75] and Daily Maverick[76] that the Eastern Cape's health system was near collapse due to staff shortages, absenteeism, strikes, and preexisting problems resulting from poor management.

State of disaster[edit]

Shoppers practicing measures of social distancing whilst buying groceries in South Africa.

By mid-March, isolation measures gathered pace, and on 15 March 2020, President Cyril Ramaphosa declared a national state of disaster, prohibiting gatherings of more than 100 people.[4]

On 17 March, Ramaphosa, supported by Deputy President David Mabuza, convened the inaugural meeting of the National Command Council on COVID-19,[5] or as it was subsequently called, the National Coronavirus Command Council,[77] "to lead the nation’s plan to contain the spread and mitigate the negative impact of the coronavirus".[6]

On 18 March, Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma signed a government gazette limiting the number of patrons at pubs, clubs, and restaurants to 50.[78]

Parliament suspended all activities as of 18 March.[79] and the African National Congress (ANC) and Democratic Alliance (DA) postponed their elective conferences.[80] The Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) cancelled all scheduled cases from 18 March 2020 and prohibited walk-in referrals of new cases – in lieu of electronic referrals.[81]

Schools were closed on 18 March 2020,[4] resuming in early June.[82] Most universities suspended classes around this time as well.[83][84][85][86][87][88] University of Pretoria, University of Cape Town, Stellenbosch University, Rhodes University, University of KwaZulu-Natal and Durban University of Technology graduation ceremonies were cancelled or postponed until further notice.[89][90][91][92]

After panic buying, some retailers put limitations on the number of certain items customers could buy.[93] On 19 March, Minister of Trade and Industry Ebrahim Patel signed a government gazette that enforces price controls on essential items and that could see price gougers punished with measures including a R10 million fine, a fine equivalent to 10% of a firm's turnover, or 12 months in prison.[94]

On 3 June, Minister Dlamini-Zuma extended the state of disaster, which was to lapse on 15 June, three months after its announcement, to 4 July citing "the need to continue augmenting the existing mitigation measures undertaken by organs of state to address the impact of the disaster."[95][96]


Lockdown[edit]

Greenmarket Square as it normally appears with many market stalls, seven days before the lockdown.
On the first day of the lockdown only people exempt from the lockdown (security personnel and sanitation workers) can be seen.
Greenmarket Square in Cape Town seven days before (left) and on the first day (right) of the COVID-19 national lockdown. After the lockdown the market stall traders that normally setup on the square everyday are not present and only people exempt from the lockdown (security personnel and municipal employees) can be seen.

On 23 March, President Cyril Ramaphosa addressed the nation and announced a 21-day national lockdown effective from midnight 26 March through to 16 April,[7] with the deployment of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to support the government.[7] On 9 April the President announced a two-week lockdown extension, until the end of April.[97] Exempt from the lockdown are people deemed necessary to the effective response to the pandemic such as:

  • health workers, pharmacy and laboratory personnel, emergency personnel;[98][99]
  • security services (police officers, military personnel, and private security[100]);[98][99]
  • people regarded as necessary to the basic functioning of the economy (supermarkets, transportation and logistical services, petrol stations, banks, essential financial and payment services); and[98][99]
  • those working in industries that can not be economically shut down (such as mines and steel mills).[100]

During the lockdown, all gatherings except for funerals were prohibited.[101] Restaurants, taverns, bottle stores and all other stores not selling essential goods were to close during the lockdown period.[100] Schools, already closed a week before the lockdown period, will not reopen until after the lockdown. Non-exempt people are only allowed to leave their homes during this period to access health services, collect social grants, attend small funerals (no more than 50 people) and shop for essential goods.[102] See the South African Government Gazette 25 March 2020 for a complete list of exemptions and non-exemptions during the lockdown period. South Africans were ordered not to take their dogs for a walk during the lockdown, though they may walk them around their house or apartment building.[103]

A billboard at the end of Long Street, Cape Town encourages people to stay at home during the lockdown period.

People may not be evicted from their place of residence during the lockdown.[104]

Movement between provinces, and between metropolitan and district areas are prohibited except for

  • essential workers, to and from work;
  • transportation of sanitised and disinfected cargo from ports of entry;
  • the transportation of mortal remains; and
  • the attendance of funerals (restricted).[101]

All borders of the country are closed during the lockdown, except for designated ports of entry for the transportation of fuel, cargo, and goods.[101]

International and domestic passenger flights are prohibited, except for flights authorised by the Ministry of Transport, for the evacuation of South African nationals in foreign countries, and for certain repatriations.[105]

Reduced deaths[edit]

The lockdown resulted in fewer deaths from road accidents and homicides. During Easter, from 9 April 2020 to 13 April, there were 28 fatalities from road accidents during the lockdown, compared to 162 in 2019.[106] During the lockdown, 432 murder cases were reported, compared to 1542 during the same period the previous year: 29 March 2019 to 22 April 2019.[107] Overall deaths for the year up to 21 April 2020 were "generally within the bounds of expectation" according to the Medical Research Council. Nonetheless for the 5 weeks before 21 April 2020, non-natural deaths including those from homicide and road traffic accidents were lower for both females and males.[108]

Levels[edit]

Easing of the national lockdown restrictions, based on a risk-adjusted strategy, started on 1 May 2020, becoming level 4.[9] From 1 June, the national restrictions were lowered to level 3.[10]

COVID-19 risk-adjusted strategy for easing of lockdown restrictions
5 Drastic measures required to contain the spread of the virus to save lives.[9]
5 4 Liquor ban: sale, dispensing, distribution, and transportation (except where alcohol is required for industries producing hand sanitizers, disinfectants, soap, alcohol for industrial use, household cleaning products, and liquor for export purposes). No special or events liquor licenses may be considered for approval. (26)[109][110]
5 4 Tobacco sales ban: tobacco products, e-cigarettes, and related products. (27)[110]
4 Curfew from 20:00 until 05:00, except if granted a permit to perform an essential or permitted service, or is attending to a security or medical emergency. (16.3)[110]
4 Evictions, prohibition of: orders of eviction are stayed and suspended until level 4 ends, unless overridden by a court. (19)[110]
4 Movement: people may leave their place of residence to
  • perform an essential or permitted service,
  • go to work if they have a permit,
  • buy permitted goods,
  • obtain permitted services,
  • move children, as allowed,
  • walk, run, or cycle between 06:00 and 09:00, within a 5 km of their place of residence. (16.1–2)[110]
4 Public transport: the Minister of Transport may allow the resumption of rail, bus services, taxi services; e-hailing services; and private vehicles, by setting out the hygiene conditions to limit exposure to COVID-19. (20)[110]
4 Movement between provinces, metropolitan municipalities, and district municipalities are prohibited except for workers with a permit to perform an essential or permitted service, attending funerals, transportation of mortal remains, and students of permitted schools or higher education institutions. (16.4)[110] A once-off, one-way return to place of residence between 1 May 2020 to 7 May 2020,[111] staying there until the end of level 4. (16.5)[110]
4 Closure of borders: except for designated ports of entry, and for the transportation of fuel, cargo, and goods. (21)[110]
4 Gatherings are banned, except for
  • funerals (limited to 50 people, but night vigils at funerals are banned (18.2–3); and movement between provinces, metropolitan municipalities, and district municipalities are allowed only for close family and partners with permits to do so. (18.1, 5));
  • when at a workplace; or
  • when buying or obtaining essential goods and services (23.1)[110]
4 Places closed to the public:
  • where religious, cultural, sporting, entertainment, recreational, exhibitional, organisational, or similar activities are held;
  • public parks, sports grounds and fields, beaches and swimming pools;
  • flea markets;
  • fêtes and bazaars;
  • night clubs;
  • casinos;
  • hotels, lodges, bed and breakfasts, airbnbs', timeshare facilities and resorts, and guest houses, except where required for remaining tourists confined to hotels, lodges and guest houses;
  • game reserves except where required for remaining confined tourists;
  • holiday resorts except where required for remaining confined tourists;
  • taverns and shebeens, or similar establishments; theatres and cinemas; and
  • museums (24.1–2);
  • places that pose a risk to public of COVID-19. (24.4)

Exceptions for those rendering security and maintenance services. (24.3)[110]

4 Sales allowed: food, cleaning, protective, babycare, stationery; winter clothing, bedding, heating; medical supplies; fuel, coal, wood, gas; hardware supplies for emergency home repairs and essential services by qualified tradespersons; components for vehicles for essential workers; chemicals, packaging, and supply of level 4 products.[110]
4 3 Facemasks: a cloth facemask, a homemade item, or another appropriate item that covers the nose and mouth, is mandatory when in public.[109][112]
4 3 Screening: public and at workplaces.[109]
3 Liquor ban: sale, dispensing, distribution, and transportation (except where alcohol is required for industries producing hand sanitizers, disinfectants, soap, alcohol for industrial use, household cleaning products, and liquor for export purposes or transport from manufacturing plants to storage facilities). No special or events liquor licenses may be considered for approval.[112]
3 Tobacco sales ban: tobacco products, e-cigarettes, and related products, except for export.[113][112]
3 Curfew from 21:00 until 04:00, except if granted a permit to perform an essential or permitted service, or is attending to a security or medical emergency.[114]
3 Evictions, prohibition of: orders of eviction are stayed and suspended until level 3 ends, unless overridden by a court.[113]
3 Movement: people may leave their place of residence to
  • perform an essential or permitted service,
  • go to work if they have a permit,
  • buy permitted goods,
  • obtain permitted services,
  • move children, as allowed,
  • exercise between 06:00 and 18:00, provided it is not done in groups and adheres to health protocols and social distancing,
  • attend a place of worship, provided it is within the same province,
  • attend a school or learning institution.[113]
3 Movement of children between guardians or caregivers: permitted if in possession of a court order, a parenting plan, or a permit issued by a magistrate's court, provided the household is COVID-19 free.[113]
3 Movement between provinces is prohibited except for workers with a permit to perform an essential or permitted service, moving to a new place of residence or caring for an immediate family member and possessing the appropriate affidavit, members of parliament performing oversight responsibilities, students of permitted schools or higher education institutions, attending funerals, transportation of mortal remains, obtaining medical treatment, and people returning to their place of residence from a quarantine or isolation facility.[113][114]
3 Gatherings are banned, except for
  • attending faith-based institutions (limited to 50 people or less depending on the size of the place of worship.);
  • an agricultural auction;
  • a professional non-contact sports match (only players, match officials, journalists, and medical and television crew.);
  • funerals (limited to 50 people, but night vigils at funerals are banned (18.2–3); and movement between provinces, metropolitan municipalities, and district municipalities are allowed only for close family and partners with permits to do so.);
  • auctions;
  • when at a workplace; or
  • when buying or obtaining essential goods and services.[113]
3 Places closed to the public:
  • where religious, cultural, sporting, entertainment, recreational, exhibitional, organisational, or similar activities are held;
  • gyms, fitness centres, sports grounds and fields, and swimming pools, except if training professional athletes and for hosting professional non-contact sports matches;
  • fêtes and bazaars;
  • night clubs;
  • hotels, lodges, bed and breakfasts, timeshare facilities and resorts, and guest houses, except where required for remaining tourists confined to such facilities, and for persons in quarantine or isolation;[112]
  • bars, taverns and shebeens, or similar establishments;
  • beaches and public parks, except for exercising;[112]
  • tourist attractions, except for private self-drive excursions;

Exceptions for those rendering security and maintenance services.[113]

3 Closure of borders: except for designated ports of entry, for the transportation of fuel, cargo and goods, and for humanitarian operations, repatriations, evacuations, medical emergencies, movement of staff of diplomatic and international organisations, return of a South African national or permanent resident,[114] and daily commuters.[113]
3 Public transport: the Minister of Transport may allow the resumption of rail, bus services, taxi services; e-hailing services; and private vehicles, by setting out the hygiene conditions to limit exposure to COVID-19.[113]
3 Domestic air travel is permitted except if for recreational, leisure, or tourism purposes.[115]
3 All businesses may operate, provided they follow hygiene protocols, have a COVID-19 plan and a compliance officer,[116] except for
  • liquor and tobacco retailers;
  • short-term home rental for leisure purposes (e.g. airbnbs);
  • passenger ships for leisure purposes; and
  • entertainment activities.[113][112]
3 The following places and businesses may reopen to the public:
  • personal care services, including hairdressing, barbering, facial treatments, makeup and nail salons, body massage, and piercing and tattoo parlours (from the 19 June 2020);[117]
  • restaurants for 'sit-down' meals;
  • accredited and licensed accommodation, except for home-sharing and airbnbs;
  • conferences and meetings for business purposes;
  • cinemas, theatres, libraries, museums, archives and galleries (from 6 July 2020);[118]
  • casinos; and
  • non-contact sports (e.g., golf, tennis, cricket) matches and training, and training for contact sports (from 6 July 2020);[118][119][120]
2 Further easing of restrictions, maintenance of physical distancing.[9]
1 Most normal activities resume with precautions.[9]

Enforcement[edit]

Minister of Police Bheki Cele announced, on 5 April, a reduction in cash-in-transit thefts thanks to increased road blocks and more visible policing. He also announced a reduced murder rate.[121] Trauma related hospital admission decreased by two-thirds.[122] By the end of the first seven days of the lockdown a total of 2,289 people had been arrested for violating lockdown orders[123] with over 17000 total arrests for various crimes.[124]

Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams, on 8 April, was put on special leave for two months, one without pay, for violating lockdown regulations. A picture of her appeared on social media while having lunch at ANC NEC member Mduduzi Manana's home.[125]

Enforcement was done across the country with varying degrees of success. In the Eastern Cape it was reported in early April that little to no enforcement of the lockdown was implemented in at least some of the province's rural areas.[126]

The use of force by police and SANDF personnel was controversial with multiple reports of excessive force in enforcing the lockdown.[127][128][129][36] This included incidents of beatings and preventing people from filming police abuses leading the public advocacy group Right2Know to release a statement that the police had no right to prevent the public "from exercising their constitutional right to film and record incidents".[130]

By the fifth day, three people had died due to alleged excessive force by security officials enforcing the lockdown, equaling the number of people that had died of the virus in South Africa by that date.[130][131] By 3 April, the eighth day of the lockdown, the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) reported that they were investigating eight deaths involving the police since the start of the lockdown.[132][133] At the time, this exceeded the number of deaths in the country due to the pandemic. This was in-spite of President Ramaphosa's public call for police restraint.[130] By 12 April a total of nine people had died due to police and army action following the beating to death of a man in Alexandra by the army.[134]

The South African National Editors' Forum issued a statement expressing concern over police action denying the media access to sites when covering COVID-19 related stories.[135] On 27 April the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights expressed concerns about the heavy handed and highly militarised enforcement of COVID-19 related lockdown measures in a number of countries including South Africa.[136][137] By 30 April the government confirmed that a total of five people were alleged to have been killed by police within the first three weeks of the lock down along with 152 incidents of assault by police.[138]

The Pretoria High Court ordered the South African government to take steps to prevent police abuse during the lockdown, following the death of Collins Khosa, who died of injuries after being beaten by the police.[139]

Tobacco and alcohol[edit]

During the announcement on the lifting of level 5 lockdown measures on 23 April President Ramaphosa announced that the sale of tobacco would be re-legalised, this statement was contradicted on 29 April by Minister Dlamini-Zuma. The resulting uncertainty over the legality of tobacco sales during level 4 lockdown caused British American Tobacco to file an urgent court appeal[140] which was dropped on 6 May[141] and reopened by 29 May.[142] The ban raised concerns by the Human Sciences Research Council and South African Revenue Service that it would encourage the growth of illicit tobacco sales[140] thereby growing the power and influence of organised crime.[143] The ANC Women's League defended Dlamini-Zuma's statement amid accusations that she was receiving financial support from illicit tobacco traders.[144] By 4 May President Ramaphosa confirmed the continuation of the ban during level 4.[145] The Democratic Alliance accused Dlamini-Zuma of lying to the public over the strength of support for the tobacco ban and called for her removal from office.[146][147]

During the level 5 lockdown period the sale of alcohol was banned so as to reduce pressure from alcohol related injuries further burdening hospitals.[148] The ban was controversially reimposed on 12 July[149][150][148] amid concerns that the ban was fueling the growth of illicit alcohol sales.[151]

Criticism[edit]

The uncertainties around the length of the lockdown, its intensity, and concerns over the erosion of civil liberties has drawn criticism from a number of notable individuals and political parties in South Africa. Former finance minister and senior ANC member Trevor Manuel questioned the rationality of the way in which government implemented the lockdown[152] whilst expressing concern that the lockdown endangered South African Constitution.[153][154] The DA challenged the use of the military to enforced night curfews, criticised the ban on e-commerce and restrictions on exercise hours,[155] and filed a court challenge over the constitutionality of the lack of parliamentary oversight in the National Disaster Management Act.[156] The Freedom Front Plus filed an application to the Gauteng High Court challenging the constitutional validity of the National Disaster Management Act.[157] The Economic Freedom Fighters criticised the relaxation of some of the May 2020 lockdown regulations as an example of giving into industry pressure by allowing them to reopen.[158]

Repatriation[edit]

On 14 March 2020, 112[159][160] South Africans were repatriated from Wuhan, China, and placed under observation and in quarantine at The Ranch Resort near Polokwane.[161]

Medical screening was performed prior to departure, four South Africans who were showing signs of coronavirus were left behind to mitigate risk. Only South Africans who tested negative were repatriated.[162]

Test results cleared all the South Africans, including the flight crew, pilots, hotel staff, police and soldiers involved in the humanitarian mission who, as a precautionary measure, all remained under observation and in quarantine for a 14-day period[159][160] at The Ranch Resort.[163][162][164]

Cuban doctors[edit]

On 27 April 217 Cuban medical health specialists (mostly doctors) arrived in South Africa to assist with the pandemic response at the invitation of the South African government[165][166] and were deployed across the country.[167]

Their arrival and the reported R429 million (equivalent to US$23 million) cost paid to the Cuban government was controversial.[165] The South African Medical Association stated that their deployment was premature as many South African doctors and nurses had not yet been deployed as part of the pandemic response.[166] The South African Internationally Trained Health Professionals Association criticised the government for not instead using unemployed South African medical graduates.[165] The Democratic Alliance stated that government should first prioritise using local healthcare professionals.[168] The Daily Maverick questioned the high cost paid for the doctors.[165] The United States government criticised their deployment and payments made for their services as a form of human trafficking[169] whilst the Cuban government rejected allegations of profiting from the deployment of its doctors[170] and stated that criticism was part of a "smear campaign".[165]

Donations[edit]

South Africa received donation of personal protective equipment like medical masks from China and ventilators from the United States.[171][172][173]

Impact[edit]

Economic impact[edit]

Volunteers in Philippi, Cape Town packing food parcels to be given out to the needy during the COVID 19 pandemic lockdown. The lockdown had a seriously negative impact on South Africa's economy that hit the poor and unemployed especially hard.

At the beginning of the national shutdown on 27 March South African economists predicted that the pandemic could cause a 2.5% to 10% contraction of South Africa's total GDP in 2020.[174] The national lockdown and resulting economic slowdown reduced demand for electricity by more than 7500 MW thereby temporarily reducing the impact of the long running South African energy crisis.[175] It is estimated that the government would experience a revenue shortfall for 2020 of between R70 billion and R100 billion.[176] This resulted in the South African government announcing a R500 billion (US$26.9 billion) stimulus package thereby accelerating deficit spending from 6.8% to over 10% of GDP for the 2020 financial year.[176]

The Johannesburg Stock Exchange lost 15% of its value in the week ending 13 March 2020, its worst week in 21 years.[177]

On 19 March, the South African Reserve Bank governor, Lesetja Kganyago announced a reduction of the country's repo rate by 100 basis points or 1 percentage point to 5.25%.[178] On 14 April, a further reduction to 4.25% per year was made.[179]

On 22 March, Standard Bank announced a 90-day payment holiday for small and medium-sized business and students to try and shield them from the economic impact of the outbreak, starting from 1 April.[180] By June 2020 it was estimated that the state had lost R1.5 billion rand (US$89 million) in tax revenue due to the pandemic and resulting lockdown.[181]

Within the first month of the lockdown three million South Africans had lost their jobs contributing to an increase in food insecurity and poverty.[182] By mid-July wide spread food shortages were reported across the country and in rural Eastern Cape in particular.[183]

Corruption and profit gouging[edit]

Corruption has had a significant negative impact on efforts to fight the pandemic by inflating the costs of government procurement whilst eroding public confidence in government institutions.[184][185] Years of corruption prior to the pandemic has reduced reduced the capacity of the cournty's health service.[186] Incidences of police corruption also increased during the lockdown period as security officials used their expanded positions of power to extort bribes from members of the public.[187]

Sicuro Safety and Hennox Supplies were fined after admitting to inflating its prices of face masks by 900%. A company supplying the Gauteng government was found to be charging double the price for sanitiser and four times the normal price of surgical face masks. Officials in the Kwazulu-Natal government were suspended for making "massively overpriced" purchases of PPE and blankets.[184][185] In late July President Ramaphosa announced that measures would be implemented to combat corruption in the delivery of food parcels and the procurement of exorbitantly priced goods.[186] The Special Investigation Unit (SIU) stated that it was investigating a number of suspicious transactions and alleged acts of corruption from the R500 billion rand COVID 19 Relief Fund.[188]

Social impact[edit]

Events cancelled or postponed[edit]

Major sporting codes suspended their activities, including Super Rugby,[189] 2019-20 Pro14 season,[190] Varsity Rugby,[191] Premier Soccer League,[192] Athletics South Africa,[193] Sunshine Tour golf,[194] Wimpy Lifesaving South Africa national championships[195] and Parkrun.[196] The Cape Epic cycle tour,[197] the 2020 Two Oceans Marathon[198][199] and the 2020 Comrades Marathon[200] were cancelled. 2020 Cape Town Rugby Sevens, 4–6 December 2020, were cancelled.[201][202]

Live events cancelled or postponed included the Mangaung African Cultural Festival (MACUFE),[203] Bloem Show,[204] AfrikaBurn,[205] Cape Town International Jazz Festival,[206][207] Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees,[208] Splashy Fen Festival,[209] Rand Show,[210] National Arts Festival (changing to virtual),[211] SciFest Africa (postponed to 9–15 September),[212] WWE Live South Africa (postponed until September)[213] and Comic Con Cape Town.[214] South African tours were postponed by the Lighthouse Family,[215] Boyz II Men[216] and BeBe Winans.[217]

Trade and agricultural shows postponed or cancelled included HuntEx,[218] DecorEx Cape Town & Durban,[219] Tyrexpo (postponed to 4–6 August 2020),[220] Power & Electricity World expo (postponed until 20–21 August),[221] the Pietermaritzburg Royal Show, SA Cheese Festival, Qualité Awards Dinner, and Agri-Expo Western Cape Youth Show.[222]

The Zion Christian Church cancelled its annual Easter pilgrimage.[223] The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) suspended Friday prayers, then closed mosques altogether on Sunday 22 March, but the call to prayer will still be given.[224] Chief Rabbi Warren Goldstein suspended Synagogues.[225] Traditional circumcision schools in the Eastern Cape were suspended.[226]

The City of Johannesburg closed all public facilities indefinitely including public swimming pools, recreational and civic centres, stadiums, libraries, sporting facilities, and the Johannesburg Zoo.[227] The Ethekhwini Metropolitan Municipality closed all of Durban's public facilities including swimming pools, beaches, libraries, community halls, and museums while restrictions have been put in place for the Durban Art Gallery and cemeteries to only allow 50 people at a time.[228] The City of Cape Town closed all public facilities indefinitely including public swimming pools, recreational and civic centres, stadiums, sporting facilities, and the nature reserves.[229]

South Africa's oldest pub, The Perseverance Tavern, closed down during the pandemic due to the economic impact of the extended alcohol sales ban.[230][231]

Looting[edit]

A number of liquor stores and food stores were targeted by looters in the Cape Town suburbs of Elsies River, Delft South, Samora Machel,[232] Manenberg, Sherwood Park, Nyanga Junction, and Gatesville.[233][234] On 21 July, a truck carrying COVID-19 specimens was hijacked at a clinic in Motherwell, Eastern Cape and found abandoned 500 metres away.[235][236]

Notable deaths[edit]

Misinformation[edit]

The arrival of the COVID-19 virus in South Africa saw an increase in the dissemination of misinformation about the virus on social media and other platforms. These range from messages minimising the virus's harm in the country[257] to the propagation of conspiracy theories about government actions to control the virus.[258]

Deliberately spreading fake news and other misinformation in South Africa about the virus was declared an offence punishable by a fine, six months' imprisonment, or both.[257]

One individual was arrested for posting a video showing himself drinking in public with friends following the national lock-down whilst stating that there was "nothing called corona here".[257] In another incident a man claimed that 10000 government officials would be going door-to-door using contaminated test kits to test people for the virus.[258] A conspiracy theory that Bill Gates wished to test a COVID-19 "vaccine" in Africa or South Africa first caused significant controversy on social media[259] following the publication of a now retracted story in News24.[260] Trevor Noah stated that he received hate mail for conducting the interview on The Daily Show with Gates where it was falsely reported that Gates made the claim.[259]

Fake news that 5G cellular technology was the true cause of COVID-19 symptoms also spread in the country during this period as it also did in other countries around the world.[261]

Statistics[edit]

National[edit]

  • Cumulative progression
  • Cumulative deaths
  • New confirmed cases
Deaths in South Africa by age group[262]
age deaths percentage
Unallocated 21 0.8
0–9 years 3 0.1
10–19 years 7 0.2
20–29 years 43 1.6
30–39 years 164 6.0
40–49 years 339 12.3
50–59 years 652 23.7
60–69 years 717 26.1
70–79 years 492 17.9
80–89 years 246 8.9
≥ 90 years 65 2.4

Status as of 1 July 2020

Cumulative number of tests and ratio of positive to total tests (data missing on 25 March) Rolling 3-day average number of new tests and cases

Regional[edit]

COVID-19 confirmed cases in South Africa by province ()
2020 Screened People
tested
(antigen)
Confirmed cases Hosp Deaths Rec Ref
Referred EC FS GP KZN LP MP NW NC WC un New Total ICU New Total
03-04 181 0 0 [263]
03-05 1 1 1 [2]
03-06 1 0 1
03-07 1 1 1 2 [19]
03-08 1 2 1 3 [264]
03-09 1 6 4 7 [265]
03-10 3 10 [266]
03-11 645 5 7 1 3 13 [20][267]
03-12 848 [b]0 6 8 1 1 3 16 [269][270]
03-13 924 10 10 1 3 8 24 [271][272]
03-14 1017 17 11 1 9 14 38 [273][274]
03-15 1476 24 12 1 14 13 [c]51 [275][276]
03-16 2405 31 12 1 2 16 11 62 [25][277]
03-17 2911 45 16 1 2 21 23 85 [26][278]
03-18 3070 61 19 1 4 31 31 116 [279][27][280]
03-19 4832 76 22 1 5 46 34 150 [281][282][283]
03-20 6438 7 109 24 1 5 56 52 202 [284][285][286]
03-21 7425 1 7 125 27 1 5 74 38 240 [287][288][289]
03-22 9315 2 9 132 36 1 6 88 34 274 [290][291]
03-23 12815 2 13 207 60 4 9 4 2 100 1 128 402 [292]
03-24 15529 2 18 302 80 4 9 5 2 113 19 152 554 [293][294]
03-25 2 30 319 91 4 8 5 2 183 65 155 709 [295][296]
03-26 20471 5 49 409 134 6 9 4 1 229 81 218 927 [297][298]
03-27 243 1170 1 1 31 [299][34]
03-28 31963 10 68 533 156 11 10 6 5 271 115 17 1187 0 1 [300]
03-29 35593 12 72 584 167 12 11 6 6 310 100 93 1280 1 2 [301][302]
03-30 38409 12 72 618 171 11 11 3 8 324 96 46 1326 1 3 [303][304]
03-31 41072 12 74 633 179 14 12 6 8 325 90 [d]27 1353 2 5 [306][307][305]
04-01 44292 15 76 645 186 14 12 7 9 326 90 27 1380 0 5 [308][309]
04-02 47965 17 84 663 206 16 13 ? 7 353 94 82 1462 0 5 45 [310][311][312]
04-03 50361 21 84 672 215 16 13 9 7 374 94 43 1505 2 7 [313][314]
04-04 53937 25 85 693 232 18 18 11 7 433 63 80 1585 2 9 [315]
04-05 56873 31 87 704 246 19 18 11 8 454 77 70 1655 2 11 [316][317]
04-06 58098 32 89 713 257 19 18 11 8 462 77 31 1686 1 12 [318][317]
04-07 63 1749 1 13 [319]
04-08 63776 45 88 782 354 21 21 15 13 495 11 96 1845 5 18 [320][321]
04-09 63776 61 93 795 387 22 20 15 15 515 11 1934 0 18 [322][323]
04-10 73028 68 94 801 412 24 20 18 15 541 10 2003 24 410 [324][40]
04-11 75053 69 94 813 418 23 20 19 16 546 10 2028 1 25 [325][326]
04-12 80085 88 96 865 443 23 21 19 16 587 15 145 2173 25 [327][328]
04-13 83663 104 96 890 465 23 22 22 16 617 17 2272 27 [329]
04-14 87022 174 98 909 489 24 22 22 16 643 18 2415 27 [330][331]
04-15 90515 199 97 930 519 25 22 23 16 657 18 2506 7 34 [332][333]
04-16 95060 220 98 969 539 26 22 24 16 675 16 2605 48 903 [334][335][336]
04-17 100827 246 100 1018 591 26 23 24 16 717 22 2783 2 50 [337][338]
04-18 [e]108021 270 100 1101 604 26 25 24 16 836 32 219 3034 2 52 [339][340][341]
04-19 114711 293 100 1148 617 27 23 24 16 868 42 3158 2 54 [342][343]
04-20 121510 310 105 1170 639 27 23 25 18 940 43 142 3300 4 58 1055 [344][345]
04-21 126937 345 106 1199 671 27 24 24 16 1010 43 3465 58 [346][347]
04-22 133774 377 106 1224 758 27 23 24 16 1079 1 3635 7 65 1055 [348][349][350]
04-23 3633037 24174 143570 417 106 1252 807 27 23 25 16 1279 1 318 3953 10 75 1473 [351][352][353]
04-24 152390 480 111 1281 841 29 24 25 16 1413 0 267 4220 4 79 1473 [354][355][356]
04-25 161004 488 111 1304 847 30 23 28 16 1514 0 141 4361 7 86 [357]
04-26 168643 535 110 1331 863 31 23 28 17 1608 0 4546 87 [358]
04-27 178470 588 111 1353 902 31 26 28 17 1737 0 4793 3 [f]90 [359]
04-28 6093502 [g]185497 616 113 1377 919 31 24 29 17 1870 0 [h]4996 395 93 [i]2073 [360][361][362]
04-29 197127 630 113 1408 956 31 31 29 17 2135 0 354 5350 10 103 [363][364]
04-30 7216777 72087 207530 647 116 1446 980 32 36 31 17 2342 0 297 5647 103 2073 [365][366][367]
05-01 217522 691 118 1507 1006 34 35 35 18 2507 0 5951 13 116 2382 [368]
05-02 230686 732 121 1598 1051 36 40 35 23 2700 0 6336 411 7 [j]123 2746 [369][370]
05-03 245747 774 122 1624 1076 37 46 36 24 3044 0 6783 8 131 [371][367]
05-04 257541 814 125 1661 1106 39 53 35 25 3362 0 7220 7 138 [370]
05-05 8216605 268064 838 128 1697 1142 40 57 35 26 3609 0 352 7572 10 148 [372][373][374]
05-06 279379 849 130 1720 1189 40 57 37 26 3760 0 7808 5 153 3153 [375]
05-07 292153 929 134 1804 1204 41 59 40 27 3994 0 8232 435 [k]77 8 161 [376][377][374]
05-08 307752 989 133 1851 1253 43 60 42 27 4497 0 8895 17 178 [374]
05-09 324079 1078 134 1910 1308 51 61 41 28 4809 0 525 [l]9420 8 186 4173 [379][380]
05-10 341336 1218 135 1952 1353 54 61 45 29 5168 0 595 10015 8 194 [380][381]
05-11 356067 1356 135 1971 1372 54 63 50 30 5621 0 637 10652 12 206 4357 [382]
05-12 369697 1504 135 2014 1394 54 63 51 30 6105 0 698 11350 206 4745 [383][384][385]
05-13 ~9000000 ~100000 386352 1534 138 2074 1413 54 66 52 30 6713 0 724 12074 219 [386][385]
05-14 403018 1569 145 2135 1444 55 67 58 31 7235 0 12739 19 238 5676 [387]
05-15 421555 1662 151 2210 1482 57 67 63 34 7798 0 785 13524 9 247 6083 [388]
05-16 10737341 439559 1812 153 2262 1498 59 68 64 35 8404 0 831 14355 [m] 14 261 6478 [389]
05-17 460873 1936 158 2329 1543 77 71 70 37 9294 1160 15515 3 264 7006 [390]
05-18 475071 2052 163 2343 1567 88 76 72 37 10035 0 919 16433 22 286 7298 [391][392]
05-19 488609 2135 168 2361 1616 94 78 72 37 10639 0 17200 26 312 7960 [393]
05-20 505861 2215 180 2400 1650 93 93 72 38 11262 0 18003 27 339 8950 [394]
05-21 525433 2324 184 2453 1693 121 95 77 37 12153 0 19137 30 369 [395]
05-22 543032 2459 185 2521 1735 120 98 80 39 12888 0 20125 28 397 10104 [396][397]
05-23 564370 2569 196 2633 1777 124 97 81 40 13826 0 21343 10 407 10104 [398]
05-24 ~12000000 583855 2690 202 2773 1815 128 101 94 40 14740 0 22583 22 429 11100 [10][399]
05-25 596777 2748 208 2993 1882 132 102 109 45 15396 0 23615 52 481 11917 [400]
05-26 605991 2864 206 3043 1927 132 103 115 45 15829 0 24264 43 524 12742 [401]
05-27 634996 3047 221 3167 2186 141 106 128 48 16983 0 25937 28 552 13451 [402]
05-28 655723 3306 225 3329 2349 144 111 134 51 17754 0 27403 25 577 14370 [403]
05-29 680175 3583 231 3583 2428 170 112 143 52 18906 0 1837 29240 34 611 15093 [404]
05-30 701883 3759 261 3773 2476 173 113 162 57 20160 33 1727 30967 32 643 16116 [405]
05-31 725125 3927 278 4003 2545 177 121 175 69 21382 6 1716 32683 40 683 16809 [406]
06-01 742742 4111 285 4231 2565 192 131 187 82 22567 6 1674 34357 22 705 17291 [407]
06-02 761534 4324 299 4276 2637 193 132 271 91 23568 6 1455 35812 50 755 18313 [408]
06-03 785979 4526 319 4567 2707 200 137 314 93 24657 5 1713 37525 37 792 19682 [409]
06-04 820675 4936 322 4845 2869 206 144 364 95 27006 5 3267 40792 56 858 21311 [410]
06-05 850871 5240 336 5215 2936 215 169 409 102 28807 5 2642 43434 50 908 23088 [411]
06-06 891668 5629 348 5626 3016 216 181 468 105 30379 5 2539 45973 44 952 24258 [412]
06-07 920064 5974 361 5946 3108 227 189 523 114 31824 19 2312 48285 46 998 24364 [413]
06-08 943059 6341 373 6258 3175 244 183 580 118 33568 39 2594 50879 82 1080 26099 [414]
06-09 968070 6760 391 6546 3255 253 184 604 122 34819 57 2112 52991 82 1162 29006 [415]
06-10 998400 7154 401 7195 3347 257 207 657 125 36021 57 2430 55421 48 1210 31505 [416]
06-11 1028399 7868 406 7953 3472 267 228 757 132 37422 63 3147 58568 74 1284 33252 [417]
06-12 1060425 8615 435 8781 3573 288 243 865 138 38926 63 3359 61927 70 1354 35008 [418]
06-13 1087887 9250 457 9897 3763 309 271 977 144 40605 63 3809 65736 69 1423 36850 [419]
06-14 1121958 10027 495 11164 3874 326 297 1097 156 42539 63 4302 70038 57 1480 38531 [420]
06-15 1148933 10597 512 12193 3959 362 322 1177 205 44143 63 3495 73533 88 1568 39867 [421]
06-16 1172513 11039 578 13023 4048 391 343 1281 211 45357 63 2801 76334 57 1625 42063 [422]
06-17 1200736 11919 608 14620 4238 416 391 1402 211 46555 52 4078 80412 49 1674 44331 [423]
06-18 1228098 12639 649 15898 4360 489 461 1606 214 47522 52 3478 83890 63 1737 44920 [424]
06-19 1260434 13506 658 17261 4548 503 505 1758 218 48706 52 3825 87715 94 1831 47825 [425]
06-20 1293608 14721 700 18978 4806 521 544 1957 232 50173 49 4966 92681 46 1877 50326 [426]
06-21 1328060 15751 733 20822 5030 564 573 2148 237 51441 3 4621 97302 53 1930 51608 [427]
06-22 1353176 16895 772 22341 5278 582 596 2315 254 52554 3 4288 101590 61 1991 53444 [428]
06-23 1382772 18108 814 24041 5625 622 662 2454 270 53542 0 4518 106108 111 2102 55045 [429]
06-24 1416894 19214 889 26156 6075 670 713 2618 299 55162 0 5688 111796 103 2205 56874 [430]
06-25 1460012 20487 976 28746 6590 730 783 2965 318 56780 0 6579 118375 87 2292 59974 [431]
06-26 1493104 21938 1069 31344 7090 798 855 3218 337 57941 0 6215 124590 48 2340 64111 [432]
06-27 1529009 23658 1160 34285 7786 862 925 3454 355 59315 0 7210 131800 73 2413 67094 [433]
06-28 1567084 25099 1279 36895 8433 935 1016 3647 385 60445 0 6334 138134 43 2456 68925 [434]
06-29 1596995 26195 1377 39841 9041 1011 1089 3931 404 61375 0 6130 144264 73 2529 70614 [435]
06-30 1630008 27686 1514 42881 9674 1131 1190 4187 465 62481 0 6945 151209 128 2657 73543 [436]
07-01 1666939 29340 1672 45944 10632 1175 1306 4393 494 64377 0 8124 159333 92 2749 76025 [437]
07-02 1706127 30603 1886 49937 11669 1286 1478 4788 573 65841 0 8728 168061 95 2844 81999 [438]
07-03 1745153 32157 2130 54331 12757 1406 1611 5168 626 66936 0 9063 177124 108 2952 86298 [439]
07-04 1792078 34161 2376 59373 13984 1559 1818 5644 686 68376 0 10853 187977 74 3026 91227 [440]
07-05 1830161 35648 2553 63404 15146 1706 1965 6063 734 69531 0 8773 196750 173 3199 93315 [441]
07-06 1864111 38081 2804 66891 15819 1785 2173 6410 820 70938 0 8971 205721 111 3310 97848 [442]
07-07 1907532 40401 3034 71488 16743 1950 2353 6842 888 72156 0 10134 215855 192 3502 102299 [443]
07-08 1944399 42357 3259 75015 17962 2131 2528 7147 974 73292 0 8810 224665 100 3602 106842 [444]
07-09 2000569 44432 3724 81546 19630 2381 2902 7870 1039 74815 0 13674 238339 129 3720 113061 [445]
07-10 2057232 46284 4221 87033 21386 2579 3273 8676 1168 76067 250687 3860
2020 Referred People
tested
(antigen)
EC FS GP KZN LP MP NW NC WC un New Total ICU New Total Rec Ref
Screened Confirmed cases Hosp Deaths
Cases in South Africa by province (total and per capita).

Gauteng[edit]

Map with number of confirmed cases per district and metro in Gauteng
Cases per district and metro in Gauteng as of 15 May 2020.
  10–99
  100-999
  1000+
Chart of cases in Gauteng metros with Johannesburg detail.
Cases in Gauteng Province metros with Johannesburg detail.

North West[edit]

COVID-19 confirmed cases in the North West by district ()
2020 Screened People
tested
(antigen)
Confirmed cases Hosp Deaths Rec Ref
Referred BP KK NMM RSM un Total Active ICU
04-20 17 5 2 1 25 3 13 [446]
04-22 16 5 2 1 24 [447]
04-23 17 5 2 1 25 13 [448]
04-27 19 5 2 1 1 28 16 [449]
04-28 21 5 2 1 0 29 16 [450]
04-29 21 5 2 1 0 29 16 [451]
04-30 2544 23 5 2 1 0 31 4 20 [452]
05-01 27 5 2 1 0 35 4 [453]
05-04 27 5 2 1 35 5 20 [454]
05-06 29 5 2 1 37 20 [455]
05-08 30 8 2 1 1 42 20 [456]
05-12 36 11 3 1 0 51 24 [457]
05-14 37 17 3 1 0 58 1 28 [458]
05-20 2161223 2055 40 22 7 2 1 72 1 28 [459]
05-24 49 30 11 3 1 94 1 28 [460]
2020 Referred People
tested
(antigen)
BP KK NMM RSM un Total Active ICU Deaths Rec Ref
Screened Confirmed cases Hosp
Map with number of confirmed cases per municipality in the North West.
Cases per municipality in the North West as of 24 May 2020.
  1–9
  10–99

Western Cape[edit]

On 8 July, Western Cape Premier Alan Winde tested positive for COVID-19.[461]


COVID-19 cases in South Africa, Western Cape  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases

Jun Jun Jul Jul Aug Aug Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-06-03
24,564(n.a.) 601(n.a.)
2020-06-04
26,386(+7.4%) 643(+7%)
2020-07-09
74,207(+181%) 2,224(+246%)
2020-07-10
75,718(+2%) 2,282(+2.6%)
2020-07-11
76,851(+1.5%) 2,323(+1.8%)
2020-07-12
77,476(+0.81%) 2,343(+0.86%)
2020-07-13
78,548(+1.4%) 2,367(+1%)
2020-07-14
79,332(+1%) 2,416(+2.1%)
2020-07-15
80,656(+1.7%) 2,455(+1.6%)
2020-07-16
82,264(+2%) 2,493(+1.5%)
2020-07-17
83,480(+1.5%) 2,543(+2%)
2020-07-18
84,402(+1.1%) 2,587(+1.7%)
2020-07-19
83,948(-0.54%) 2,616(+1.1%)
2020-07-20
84,340(+0.47%) 2,654(+1.5%)
2020-07-21
85,009(+0.79%) 2,694(+1.5%)
2020-07-22
86,372(+1.6%) 2,746(+1.9%)
2020-07-23
87,474(+1.3%) 2,788(+1.5%)
2020-07-24
88,499(+1.2%) 2,817(+1%)
2020-07-25
89,600(+1.2%) 2,841(+0.85%)
2020-07-26
90,576(+1.1%) 2,862(+0.74%)
2020-07-27
91,180(+0.67%) 2,897(+1.2%)
2020-07-28
91,659(+0.53%) 2,948(+1.8%)
2020-07-29
92,330(+0.73%) 2,985(+1.3%)
2020-07-30
92,845(+0.56%) 3,009(+0.8%)
2020-07-31
93,413(+0.61%) 3,040(+1%)
2020-08-01
94,197(+0.84%) 3,070(+0.99%)
2020-08-02
94,691(+0.52%) 3,105(+1.1%)
2020-08-03
95,407(+0.76%) 3,143(+1.2%)



COVID-19 confirmed cases in the Western Cape by district and metro ()
2020 Screened People
tested
(antigen)
Confirmed cases Hosp Deaths Rec Ref
Referred CT Wi Ka Ga Ov We un Total Active I/HC
31 Mar 00:01 289 22 0 26 6 2 3 348 13 3 50 [462]
1 Apr 00:01 305 22 0 30 8 2 3 370 16 4 [463]
2 Apr 00:01 321 22 0 37 8 2 3 393 20 7 [464]
3 Apr 00:01 333 27 0 42 10 2 4 418 25 7 [465]
4 Apr 347 28 0 45 10 3 13 446 23 9 [466]
5 Apr 368 28 0 50 10 4 4 464 20 9 [467]
6 Apr 1,492 45 377 28 0 53 10 4 3 475 26 12 2 [468]
7 Apr 389 28 0 54 10 4 5 490 28 10 3 [469]
8 Apr 3,930 258 407 29 0 55 10 5 4 510 31 9 [470]
9 Apr 00:01 8,215 449 421 29 0 55 10 5 2 522 32 10 162 [471]
10 Apr 00:01 12376 852 440 29 0 55 10 5 6 545 31 12 6 [472]
11 Apr 00:01 463 29 0 56 10 5 4 567 29 12 [473]
12 Apr 00:01 492 29 0 57 10 5 6 599 24 11 7 [474]
13 Apr 00:01 512 29 0 56 10 5 16 628 29 15 [475]
14 Apr 00:01 548 30 0 56 10 5 9 657 35 18 184 [476]
15 Apr 00:01 1,220 571 31 0 55 11 5 3 676 477 37 18 7 192 [477]
16 Apr 00:01 28,718 2,102 12,785 591 34 0 55 11 7 4 702 490 35 16 7 205 [478]
17 Apr 00:01 41,099 2,782 13,752 617 38 0 55 11 7 15 743 525 33 16 13 205 [479]
17:00 62,509 3,195 680 44 0 57 12 6 13 812 587 38 15 15 210 [480]
18 Apr 17:00 16,499 725 46 0 60 12 8 15 866 635 38 12 16 215 [481]
19 Apr 17:00 17,307 755 60 0 60 12 8 10 905 673 37 17 17 215 [482]
20 Apr 17:00 81,629 3,818 18,931 804 65 0 60 12 8 25 974 736 39 17 17 221 [483]
21 Apr 17:00 20,268 856 78 0 60 12 9 53 1,068 817 43 19 22 229 [484]
22 Apr 17:00 123,683 5,230 21,077 954 89 0 60 12 9 29 1,153 892 53 23 25 236 [485]
23 Apr 17:00 150,847 6,006 22691 1,110 107 0 60 12 10 15 1,314 1,042 62 24 28 244 [486]
24 Apr 17:00 24,241 1,198 130 0 60 12 10 25 1,435 1,156 63 16 30 249 [487]
25 Apr 17:00 25,774 1,285 130 0 60 12 10 34 1,531 1,250 68 26 32 249 [488]
26 Apr 17:00 26,666 1,363 147 0 60 12 12 24 1,618 1,336 75 26 33 249 [489]
27 Apr 17:00 28,704 1,508 155 0 61 12 12 30 1,778 1,336 83 28 35 [n]607 [490]
28 Apr 17:00 ~200,000 ~7,000 30803 1,660 162 0 61 12 11 29 1,935 1,273 84 26 38 624 [491]
30 Apr 13:00 227,890 7,886 35867 2,020 178 0 61 14 11 87 2,371 1,668 96 31 46 657 [492]
1 May 13:00 37,557 2,154 185 0 61 13 11 112 2,536 1,792 106 35 48 696 [493]
2 May 13:00 ~250,000 3990 2,398 195 0 62 16 14 98 2,783 1,952 114 39 52 779 [494]
3 May 13:00 43,690 2,705 201 0 63 17 12 115 3,113 2,222 113 38 58 833 [495]
4 May 13:00 46,285 3,015 211 0 63 18 13 131 3,451 2,493 132 51 64 894 [496]
5 May 13:00 267,347 8,838 47751 3,246 218 0 62 18 14 119 3,677 2,610 153 55 70 997 [497]
6 May 13:00 284,731 9,418 48,168 3,325 219 0 63 19 15 130 3,771 2,577 150 62 72 1,122 [498]
7 May 13:00 50,288 3,547 234 0 63 20 15 170 4,049 2,640 150 61 76 1,333 [499]
8 May 13:00 53,476 4,015 247 0 64 23 25 210 4,584 2,979 87 1,518 [500]
9 May 13:00 57,840 4,375 261 0 66 26 26 162 4,916 3,309 167 62 95 1,607 [501]
10 May 13:00 61,771 4,711 274 0 66 27 28 201 5,307 3,568 183 68 102 1,739 [502]
11 May 13:00 66,806 5,167 290 0 65 31 33 227 5,813 3,911 [o]106 1,796 [503]
12 May 13:00 69,422 5,320 314 0 69 32 41 118 6,194 4,134 234 57 110 1,950 [504]
13 May 13:00 73,589 6,154 339 0 72 37 51 114 6,767 4,367 117 2,283 [505]
14 May 13:00 77,310 6,487 347 0 75 36 53 222 7,220 4,518 325 120 129 2,573 [506]
15 May 13:00 ~447,000 ~11,600 80,100 6,925 366 0 78 38 52 127 7,586 4,592 345 123 137 2,857 [507]
16 May 13:00 86,250 7,456 395 0 80 45 57 474 8,507 5,263 360 108 147 3,097 [508]
17 May 13:00 90,750 8,128 431 0 88 52 60 487 9,246 5,569 360 108 156 3,521 [509]
18 May 13:00 94,275 8,763 456 1 100 53 75 479 9,927 6,031 424 111 165 3,731 [510]
19 May 13:00 473,348 12,095 [p]96,991 9,370 499 1 102 58 71 457 10,558 [q]6,195 [r]440 [s]128 183 4,363 [511]
20 May 13:00 100,721 9,663 515 1 108 50 70 665 11,072 5,967 470 143 211 5,105 [512]
21 May 13:00 104,347 10,223 540 1 112 53 76 805 11,810 5,898 235 5,677 [513]
22 May 13:00 107,567 10,676 562 1 121 55 80 1024 12,519 6,136 257 6,126 [514]
23 May 13:00 114,869 11,338 635 1 140 65 95 673 12,947 6,146 [t]557 [u]154 276 6,525 [515]
24 May 13:00 121,072 12,248 722 1 150 75 106 667 13,969 6,719 569 151 300 6,950 [516]
25 May 13:00 [v]124079 13,187 783 2 168 88 112 638 14,978 7,439 554 139 318 7,221 [517]
26 May 13:00 128,558 13,747 851 2 171 88 119 778 15,756 7,555 665 178 357 7,844 [518]
27 May 13:00 133,489 14,554 932 2 178 99 134 652 16,551 7,660 660 182 387 8,504 [519]
28 May 13:00 136,597 15,256 988 2 179 106 150 605 17,286 7,726 718 157 403 9,157 [520]
29 May 13:00 140,627 16,181 1,109 2 182 115 173 588 18,350 9,830 887 188 437 9,830 [521]
30 May 13:00 16,845 1,259 4 187 122 190 853 19,460 8,480 890 189 472 10,508 [522]
31 May 13:00 155,876 17,165 1,325 6 194 124 212 2,077 21,103 9,516 891 187 488 11,099 [523]
1 Jun 13:00 160,448 17,991 1,486 3 205 143 231 2,028 22,087 10,135 958 181 521 11,431 [524]
2 Jun 13:00 164,781 19,038 1,571 2 207 155 251 1,871 23,095 10,097 992 179 562 12,436 [525]
3 Jun 13:00 172,126 20,769 1,722 2 209 178 264 1,420 24,564 10,267 1,003 194 601 13,696 [526]
4 Jun 13:00 179,247 22,067 1,892 2 228 191 309 1,697 26,386 11,469 973 193 643 14,917 [527]
9 Jul 13:00 340,286 53,764 7,927 69 2,241 1,874 2,013 6,319 74,207 16,449 1,703 330 2,224 55,534 [528]
10 Jul 13:00 344,109 54,104 8,038 73 2,440 1,910 2,054 7,099 75,718 16,302 1,680 322 2,282 57,134 [529]
11 Jul 13:00 347,945 55,288 8,298 84 2,648 2,008 2,122 6,133 76,851 15,930 1,660 294 2,323 58,598 [530]
12 Jul 13:00 350,961 55,496 8,358 85 2,701 2,005 2,146 6,684 77,476 16,063 1,627 289 2,343 59,070 [531]
13 Jul 13:00 353,823 56,223 8,495 87 2,884 2,062 2,203 6,594 78,548 16,689 1,628 289 2,367 59,492 [532]
14 Jul 13:00 356,153 56,632 8,579 91 2,942 2,086 2,225 6,777 79,332 15,160 1,636 300 2,416 61,756 [533]
15 Jul 13:00 360,135 57,194 8,678 101 3,067 2,128 2,258 7,230 80,656 14,470 1,645 311 2,455 63,731 [534]
16 Jul 13:00 365,009 57,926 8,950 119 3,339 2,194 2,331 7,405 82,264 14,241 1,634 317 2,493 65,530 [535]
17 Jul 13:00 368,621 58,474 9,059 124 3,482 2,229 2,373 7,739 83,480 13,756 2,543 67,181 [536]
18 Jul 13:00 372,504 59,020 9,241 127 3,713 2,287 2,436 7,578 84,402 13,405 1,607 329 2,587 68,410 [537]
19 Jul 13:00 374,374 59,235 9,283 136 3,833 2,310 2,467 6,684 [w]83,948 13,331 1,578 326 2,616 68,001 [538]
20 Jul 13:00 376,430 59,864 9,415 142 3,939 2,352 2,531 6,097 84,340 13,352 1,555 337 2,654 68,334 [539]
21 Jul 13:00 378,895 60,120 9,478 154 4,067 2,380 2,560 6,250 85,009 12,254 1,569 333 2,694 70,061 [540]
22 Jul 13:00 384,197 61,075 9,654 164 4,355 2,483 2,637 6,004 86,372 12,135 1,622 337 2,746 71,491 [541]
23 Jul 13:00 388,251 61,708 9,780 173 4,563 2,524 2,687 6,039 87,474 11,991 1,621 357 2,788 72,695 [542]
24 Jul 13:00 392,082 62,329 9,926 187 4,792 2,553 2,751 5,961 88,499 11,785 1,481 282 2,817 73,897 [543]
25 Jul 13:00 396,136 62,900 10,062 220 5,054 2,596 2,596 5,928 89,600 11,772 1,482 276 2,841 74,987 [544]
26 Jul 13:00 400,571 63,155 10,174 236 5,241 2,635 2,855 6,280 90,576 12,539 1,482 274 2,862 75,355 [545]
27 Jul 13:00 402,630 63,251 10,231 239 5,375 2,657 2,875 6,552 91,180 12,688 1,475 275 2,897 75,595 [546]
28 Jul 13:00 404,635 63,565 10,322 252 5,497 2,668 2,900 6,455 91,659 11,876 1,454 272 2,948 76,835 [547]
29 Jul 13:00 408,539 63,853 10,380 255 5,555 2,690 2,908 6,689 92,330 11,522 1,482 273 2,985 77,823 [548]
30 Jul 13:00 411,015 64,121 10,459 264 5,709 2,711 2,925 6,656 92,845 10,915 1,500 280 3,009 78,921 [549]
31 Jul 13:00 414,304 64,323 10,474 269 5,736 2,712 2,930 6,969 92,845 10,532 1,433 281 3,040 79,841 [550]
1 Aug 13:00 418,585 65,172 10,683 294 6,077 2,770 3,012 6,189 94,197 10,377 1,311 279 3,070 80,750 [551]
2 Aug 13:00 421,358 65,339 10,734 324 6,233 2,808 3,053 6,200 94,691 10,630 1,450 276 3,105 80,956 [552]
3 Aug 13:00 423,234 65,607 10,830 332 6,359 2,832 3,103 6,344 95,407 10,955 1,387 295 3,143 81,309 [553]
2020 Referred People
tested
(antigen)
CT Wi Ka Ga Ov We un Total Active I/HC Deaths Rec Ref
Screened Confirmed cases Hosp
Map with number of confirmed cases per local and metro municipality in the Western Cape
Cases per local and metro municipality in the Western Cape as of 25 May 2020.
  1–9
  10–99
  100-999
  1000-9999
  10000+
Map with number of confirmed recoveries per local and metro municipality in the Western Cape
Recoveries per local and metro municipality in the Western Cape as of 25 May 2020.
  1–9
  10–99
  100-999
  1000+

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ 61 cases announced by president Ramaphosa later in the evening.
  2. ^ Free State case found to be not positive after confirmation test.[268]
  3. ^ 61 cases announced by president Ramaphosa later in the evening.[4]
  4. ^ Originally 46 new cases were reported.[305]
  5. ^ 123008 total tests, including repeat tests on the same person
  6. ^ 2020-04-27 23:59[51]
  7. ^ 2020-04-27 23:59[51]
  8. ^ 2020-04-27 23:59, median age 38 years (IQR 29-51 years), those aged <10 years accounted for 3% (156/4996)[51]
  9. ^ 2830 active cases
  10. ^ The median age of patients who died was 64.[369]
  11. ^ 40 ventilated
  12. ^ 2020-05-09 23:59, median age 37 years (IQR 28-49 years), with the highest risk amongst those aged 40-44.[378]
  13. ^ 376 quarantine sites with 30823 quarantine beds
  14. ^ Changed to automated recovery reporting, instead of manual recording of each patient's recovery.[490]
  15. ^ 94% had at least 1 comorbidity, 65%+ had more than 2 comorbidities
  16. ^ 12 testing and triage centres. 1,347.27 tests per 100,000
  17. ^ 19 quarantine and isolation facilities with 2,365 beds
  18. ^ 2,162 general beds in central and regional hospitals.
  19. ^ 150 ICU beds in central and regional hospitals. 432 ventilators.
  20. ^ 2,162 acute beds
  21. ^ 450 beds (150 at public healthcare facilities, 300 in the private sector)
  22. ^ Backlog of 18,000 tests
  23. ^ Lower than previous day's figures, as some cases from other provinces had previously mistakenly been allocated to the Western Cape.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "South Africa Coronavirus". Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Minister Zweli Mkhize reports first case of Covid-19 Coronavirus". South African Ministry of Health. 5 March 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  3. ^ "Disaster Management Act 57 of 2002 | South African Government". gov.za. Retrieved 17 April 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e Ramaphosa, Cyril (15 March 2020). "Statement by President Cyril Ramaphosa on measures to combat COVID-19 epidemic". The Presidency. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  5. ^ a b c "President Cyril Ramaphosa meets with political parties to combat Coronavirus COVID-19, 18 Mar". South African Government. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  6. ^ a b "South Africa to begin easing of lockdown". The Advertiser (Adelaide). 24 April 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d "Ramaphosa announces 21 day coronavirus lockdown for South Africa". businesstech.co.za. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  8. ^ "Ramaphosa announces South Africa's biggest spending plan ever to fight coronavirus". Fin24. 21 April 2020. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  9. ^ a b c d e "Statement by president Cyril Ramaphosa on South Africa's response to the coronavirus pandemic, Union buildings, Tshwane". SA Corona Virus Online Portal. 23 April 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  10. ^ a b c "President Cyril Ramaphosa: Developments in South Africa's risk-adjusted strategy to manage the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 24 May 2020. Retrieved 24 May 2020.
  11. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 6 336 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19 | South African Government". gov.za. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
  12. ^ "https://twitter.com/nicd_sa/status/1290378715764068358". Twitter. Retrieved 4 August 2020. External link in |title= (help)
  13. ^ "Health updates on Coronavirus on 9 March 2020". South African Ministry of Health. 9 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  14. ^ Soodyal, Nushera (6 March 2020). "Coronavirus: Hilton school shut fears of COVID-19, officials descend". Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  15. ^ Bafetane, Vusi (6 March 2020). "SA coronavirus case came via Dubai to Durban: Mkhize". MSN. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  16. ^ Shoba, Sandisiwe; Erasmus, Desiree. "Covid-19: As first Coronavirus case confirmed, South Africa told to keep calm". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  17. ^ Herman, Paul. "Coronavirus: SA's first positive case of Covid-19 confirmed". News24. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  18. ^ "AS IT HAPPENED There are no other confirmed coronavirus patients in SA, says Mkhize". News24. 6 March 2020. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  19. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms second case of Covid-19 in South Africa". South African Ministry of Health. 7 March 2020. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  20. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms six new cases of Coronavirus Covid-19". South African Ministry of Health. 11 March 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  21. ^ "Coronavirus in SA: Mkhize confirms Free State case not positive". eNCA. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  22. ^ "Dr Zweli Mkhize on latest confirmed cases of Coronavirus COVID-19 in South Africa". Department of Health. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  23. ^ Karrim, Azarrah (12 March 2020). "Coronavirus in SA: 4 more cases confirmed". 24.com. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  24. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  25. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize on confirmed cases of Coronavirus COVID-19 and national state of disaster declaration". Department of Health. 16 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  26. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 23 more cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  27. ^ a b "Dr Zweli Mkhize confirms 116 more Coronavirus COVID-19 cases in South Africa". Department of Health. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  28. ^ Cilliers, Charles. "Mkhize says two-thirds of SA likely to get Covid-19". The Citizen. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  29. ^ "202 confirmed coronavirus cases in South Africa". businesstech.co.za. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  30. ^ "Coronavirus: Patient Zero and one other are home and all clear". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  31. ^ Zimbabwe has 1st COVID-19 case while Africa cancels flights By CARA ANNA and FARAI MUTSAKA, Associated Press, 20 March 2020
  32. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 38 more cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 21 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  33. ^ "Coronavirus morning update: SA prepares for lockdown as confirmed cases hit 402". health24. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  34. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 1170 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19 | South African Government". www.gov.za. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  35. ^ "Whole-Genome Sequence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) obtained from a South African Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Patient". Virological. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  36. ^ a b c Harding, Andrew (3 April 2020). "South Africa's ruthlessly efficient fight against coronavirus". BBC News. Archived from the original on 3 April 2020.
  37. ^ "Uncle Cyril, lockdown extension and pay cuts: Twitter is lit". DispatchLIVE. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  38. ^ Naidoo, Suren (9 April 2020). "KZN health dept shuts down Netcare hospital". Moneyweb. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  39. ^ Harding, Andrew (10 April 2020). "South Africa's mysterious coronavirus lull". BBC News.
  40. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 24 deaths and total of 2003 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 10 April 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  41. ^ "Everyone should wear a face mask". COVID-19 South African online portal. 10 April 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  42. ^ a b Mitchley, Alex (12 April 2020). "Covid-19 cases in SA rise to 2 173, public lab testing gains pace". Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  43. ^ Mitchley, Alex (12 April 2020). "23 officials, 3 prisoners test positive for Covid-19 at East London prison". Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  44. ^ "The difficult truth: Rise in cases expected after lockdown, says expert". News24. 13 April 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  45. ^ "SA's 8 stages in the fight against Covid-19: What you need to know". TimesLIVE. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  46. ^ "SA's COVID-19 epidemic: Trends & Next steps". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 13 April 2020. pp. slide 24. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  47. ^ National Institute for Communicable Disease [@nicd_sa] (13 April 2020). "UPDATE: We are saddened to report 27 deaths to date. We send our condolences to their families and friends. The number of infections continues to grow and there are now 2272 confirmed cases of #COVID19. Stay at home unless it's absolutely essential to go out. #KeepSASafe" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  48. ^ National Institute for Communicable Disease [@nicd_sa] (14 April 2020). "UPDATE: The number of infections continues to grow and there are now 2415 confirmed cases of #COVID19. We urge the public to take preventive measures. We are going through a most challenging period, but we shall overcome. #StaySafeSA" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  49. ^ a b National Institute for Communicable Disease [@nicd_sa] (23 April 2020). "UPDATE: The total number of confirmed #COVID19 cases in South Africa is 3 953. Today we regrettably report 10 new #COVID19 related deaths. We convey our condolences to the families and friends" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  50. ^ Data Science for Social Impact Research Group, University of Pretoria. "covid19za_provincial_cumulative_timeline_confirmed.csv". github.com. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  51. ^ a b c d e f "COVID-19 Weekly Epidemiology Brief: Week 18, 2020" (PDF). NICD. 1 May 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  52. ^ "South Africa receives medical supplies from China". People's Daily. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  53. ^ a b Hunter, Qaanitah (19 May 2020). "Grim Covid-19 projections for SA: 40 000 deaths, 1 million infections and a dire shortage of ICU beds". 24.com. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  54. ^ Pulliam, Juliet (22 May 2020). "Behind the numbers: Modelling the spread of Covid-19 in South Africa". news24. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
  55. ^ Williams, Murray (12 July 2020). "'This is a fight to save every life': Ramaphosa bans booze, enforces masks and announces curfew". News24. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  56. ^ a b News, Eyewitness. "FULL SPEECH: Ramaphosa's address to the nation". ewn.co.za. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  57. ^ a b c d Cowan, Kyle. "Researchers find 'huge discrepancy' between reported number of Covid-19 fatalities and excess deaths". News24. Retrieved 23 July 2020.
  58. ^ a b c The South African Medical Research Council (22 July 2020). "Weekly Deaths suggests higher numbers of COVID-19 deaths". Retrieved 23 July 2020.
  59. ^ Fengu, Msindisi. "Public schools to close for 4 weeks, academic year will be extended". Citypress. Retrieved 23 July 2020.
  60. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize: Evacuation of citizens from Wuhan". Department of Health. 1 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  61. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 7 February 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  62. ^ Ferial Haffajee; Maverick Citizen; Maverick Insider Team (19 March 2020). "Coronavirus Explainer: Maverick Insider Covid-19 Questions, Answered". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  63. ^ "President Cyril Ramaphosa: Update on Coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown". South African Government. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  64. ^ Davis", Rebecca (9 April 2020). "Top health adviser says SA's coronavirus testing approach was initially too limited". Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  65. ^ "Implementation of the Preparedness and Upscaling Plan as of 7 April, 2020" (PDF). NHLS. 8 April 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  66. ^ a b Low, Marcus (9 April 2020). "NHLS claims it can do 15,000 Covid-19 tests a day". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  67. ^ "owid/covid-19-data". Our World in Data. 10 April 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  68. ^ Kahn, Tamar (14 April 2020). "SA can conduct 25,000 Covid-19 tests a day, Business for SA says". Business Day (South Africa). Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  69. ^ National Institute for Communicable Disease (23 April 2020). "COVID-19 Update". Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  70. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (28th June 2020)". sacoronavirus.co.za. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  71. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (11th July 2020)". sacoronavirus.co.za. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  72. ^ "SAHPRA responds to coronavirus (COVID-19): Medicines/medical devices supply challenges" (PDF). South African Health Products Regulatory Authority. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 17 April 2020.
  73. ^ Baleta, Adele (1 April 2020). "COVID-19: SA to start enrolling patients in landmark WHO trial". Spotlight. Retrieved 4 May 2020.
  74. ^ "First COVID-19 vaccine trials begin in Africa". The Week. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  75. ^ Harding, Andrew (15 July 2020). "Inside South Africa's 'hospitals of horrors'". BBC News. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  76. ^ Ellis, Estelle (24 June 2020). "Coronavirus Eastern Cape: Nelson Mandela Bay state maternity services near collapse as workers stay away". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  77. ^ "President Cyril Ramaphosa Established a National Command Council on Coronavirus on 17 March 2020". 18 March 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020 – via YouTube.
  78. ^ "Coronavirus: Govt clamps down on pubs and clubs, limits patrons to 50 and declares 6pm as closing time". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  79. ^ COVID-19: Parliament closes until further notice – EWN
  80. ^ ANC, DA postpone conferences amid coronavirus fears – IOL
  81. ^ "The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration | CCMA".
  82. ^ "South African schools reopen after March lockdown eased". The Jakarta Post. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  83. ^ Ellis, Estelle. "Wits and UCT suspend all contact classes". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  84. ^ "Covid-19: Wits and University of Johannesburg cancel all contact classes". The Citizen.
  85. ^ May, Zizonke. "NMU academic activities to continue in wake of coronavirus". Herald Live. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  86. ^ Kupe, Tawana. "UPDATE: Postponement of contact classes and rescheduling of academic calendar". University of Pretoria. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  87. ^ de Villiers, Wil. "COVID-19 Update: SU suspends lectures from 17 March". Stellenbosch University.
  88. ^ Ntsane, Marvin. "#CoronaOutbreak: UFS fourth SA university to close". ofm.co.za. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  89. ^ Kassen, Jarita. "STELLENBOSCH, UCT CANCEL UPCOMING GRADUATIONS DUE TO CORONAVIRUS". EWN. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  90. ^ McCain, Nicole (14 March 2020). "Coronavirus in SA: UCT graduations suspended amid Covid-19 concerns". News24. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  91. ^ "Universities cancelling in-person classes due to coronavirus". The Sowetan. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  92. ^ "UPDATE: Postponement of contact classes and rescheduling of academic calendar".
  93. ^ Caboz, Jay (19 March 2020). "Woolworths stops food demonstrations, limits items per customer – here's what other retailers are doing". Business Insider. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  94. ^ "New regulations bring coronavirus price controls for certain high-demand products – here's what is on the list". BusinessTech. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  95. ^ "Disaster Management Act: Extension of National State of Disaster (Drought) under Coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown" (PDF). Government of South Africa. 3 June 2020.
  96. ^ Merten, Marianne (4 June 2020). "NEWSFLASH: Cabinet extends State of Disaster – and appeals judgment against Covid-19 lockdown rules". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 5 June 2020.
  97. ^ "South African lockdown extended – 2 more weeks". MyBroadband. 9 April 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  98. ^ a b c "Essential services to remain in place as SA enters lockdown". SAnews. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  99. ^ a b c "This is who is exempt from national lockdown – and what will be closed". TimesLIVE. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  100. ^ a b c "Your 21 day national house imprisonment order – NDZ – DOCUMENTS". politicsweb.co.za. GOVERNMENT GAZETTE 25 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020 – via Politicsweb.
  101. ^ a b c "Disaster Management Act: Regulations to address, prevent and combat the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19: Amendment". Government of South Africa. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  102. ^ Voigt, Elri (26 March 2020). "Covid-19: What you may and may not do during 21-day lockdown in SA". City Press (South Africa). Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  103. ^ Schrader, Adam (25 March 2020). "South Africa bans walking dogs during coronavirus crisis". New York Post. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  104. ^ "Minister Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma on Coronavirus COVID-19 amended regulations". Department of Cooperative Governance. 16 April 2020. Retrieved 16 April 2020.
  105. ^ "Lockdown: These are the only flights you can take in – or out of – SA". Blue Sky Publications. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  106. ^ "Statement issued by the minister of transport, Fikile Mbalula, on the occasion of the release of Easter fatalities statistics on 17 April 2020". Department of Transport. 17 April 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  107. ^ "Murder down by 1 110 cases – Cele attributes drop to alcohol ban, increased patrols and lockdown". 24.com. 22 April 2020. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  108. ^ Bradshaw, Debbie; Laubscher, Ria; Dorrington, Rob; Groenewald, Pam; Moultrie, Tom (28 April 2020). "Report on weekly deaths in South Africa, 1 January – 21 April 2020" (PDF). South African Medical Research Council. Retrieved 4 May 2020.
  109. ^ a b c "Lockdown curfew from 20:00 to 05:00 starting on 1 May". 24.com. 25 April 2020. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  110. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Disaster Management Act: Regulations: Alert level 4 during Coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown". Government of South Africa. 29 April 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  111. ^ "Minister Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma on directions of once off movement of persons during Coronavirus COVID-19 alert level 4". Government of South Africa. 30 April 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  112. ^ a b c d e f "Disaster Management Act: Regulations: Alert level 3 during Coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown: Amendment" (PDF). South African Government. 12 July 2020. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  113. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Disaster Management Act: Regulations: Alert level 3 during Coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown" (PDF). Government of South Africa. 28 May 2020. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  114. ^ a b c "Disaster Management Act: Regulations: Alert level 3 during Coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown | South African Government". gov.za. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  115. ^ "Disaster Management Act: Measures to prevent and combat the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19 in the public transport services: Air services: Amendment" (PDF). Government of South Africa. 30 May 2020. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  116. ^ "South Africa's level 3 lockdown – what you need to know, including the times you can buy alcohol". BusinessTech. 28 May 2020. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  117. ^ "Disaster Management Act: Directions to address, prevent and combat the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19: Protocols for the Personal Care Services" (PDF). Government of South Africa. 19 June 2020. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  118. ^ a b "Disaster Management Act: Directions to address, prevent and combat the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19: Sporting events, training and matches to resume, opening of libraries, museums, cinemas, theatres, galleries and archives under Alert Level 3: Amendment" (PDF). South African Government. 6 July 2020. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  119. ^ Villiers, James de (18 June 2020). "EXPLAINER – Easing lockdown: 10 things you need to know from Ramaphosa's speech". News24. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  120. ^ Eyewitness (17 June 2020). "Cinemas, hair salons, casinos & others to reopen – Ramaphosa". EWN. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  121. ^ Masuabi, Queenin (5 April 2020). "Bheki Cele: 'I wish alcohol ban could be extended beyond lockdown'". City Press. South Africa. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  122. ^ Dyk, Joan van (17 April 2020). "Will Ramaphosa announce an end to South Africa's national alcohol ban today?". Bhekisisa. Retrieved 17 April 2020.
  123. ^ "'Don't give us a reason to arrest you' – Cele, as lockdown arrests rise to 2 289". News24. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  124. ^ "Over 17 000 people arrested since lockdown kicked off". News24. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  125. ^ "Ramaphosa places Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams on partly unpaid special leave". The Citizen. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  126. ^ "Lockdown? Life continues as normal in some parts of the Eastern Cape". TimesLIVE. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  127. ^ Bhengu, Cebelihle (31 March 2020). "Mzansi reacts to police & army 'brutality' during lockdown – 'they must respect the law'". TimesLIVE. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  128. ^ Reddy, Micah; Allison, Simon (30 March 2020). "Police use sjamboks and rubber bullets to enforce Hillbrow lockdown". The Mail & Guardian. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  129. ^ "Where Cele went wrong with lockdown regulations". Cape Times. South Africa. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  130. ^ a b c Knoetze, Daneel (1 April 2020). "Police kill three people in three days of lockdown. This is normal for South Africa". GroundUp News. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  131. ^ Seleka, Ntwaagae (31 March 2020). "Cops, metro cop face 3 counts of murder and other serious charges". News24. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  132. ^ Nyathi, Ayanda (3 April 2020). "Ipid investigates after 8 deaths recorded since lockdown". Eye Witness News. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  133. ^ Mokgatlhe, Kenneth; Ngoepe, Karabo (5 April 2020). "Police brutality on the rise during lockdown". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  134. ^ "SANDF issues stern warning after soldiers accused of beating Alexandra man to death". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  135. ^ "Sanef sounds alarm over the treatment of the media in Cape Town". News24. 8 April 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  136. ^ "Covid-19: UN Human Rights Office concerned by excessive force, death reports during SA lockdown". News24. 28 April 2020. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  137. ^ "UN raises alarm about police brutality in COVID-19 lockdowns". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  138. ^ Knoetze, Daneel (30 April 2020). "Details of two additional alleged lockdown killings by police revealed". GroundUp News. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  139. ^ Swart, Mia (17 May 2020). "S Africa court issues orders to end police abuse during lockdown". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  140. ^ a b "Batsa questions indefinite tobacco ban". Moneyweb. 2 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  141. ^ Khumalo, Juniour (6 May 2020). "British American Tobacco drops legal action against government". City Press. South Africa. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  142. ^ Haffajee, Ferial (29 May 2020). "Analysis: Dlamini Zuma's tobacco ban and the political divisions it is causing". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 1 June 2020.
  143. ^ Pauw, Jacques (31 May 2020). "Tobacco trade bred industry with 'criminality, political links embedded in DNA'". News24. Retrieved 1 June 2020.
  144. ^ "ANCWL fuming over treatment of Dlamini-Zuma on cigarette about-turn". News24. 3 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  145. ^ "Ramaphosa backs Dlamini-Zuma in cigarette ban war". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  146. ^ "Fire Dlamini Zuma if she lied about support for tobacco ban, says DA's Steenhuisen". Independent Online. South Africa. 29 May 2020. Retrieved 1 June 2020.
  147. ^ Tandwa, Lizeka (29 May 2020). "Cigarette sales ban: DA labels Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma a 'liar', says Ramaphosa should 'fire' her". News24. Retrieved 1 June 2020.
  148. ^ a b "Return of alcohol ban stirs debate in South Africa". aljazeera.com. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  149. ^ "South Africa bans alcohol sales". The Economist. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  150. ^ "New Covid-19 alcohol ban divides South Africans". BBC News. 13 July 2020. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  151. ^ Mut, Kimberly; iro (29 May 2020). "South Africa: Alcohol Ban Creates Flourishing Black Market for Ghanaian Whisky". allAfrica.com. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  152. ^ "'You aren't allowed to sell T-shirts, flip-flops?' Trevor Manuel slams 'irrationality' of lockdown regulations". News24. 13 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  153. ^ Davis, Rebecca. "NEWSFLASH: Trevor Manuel: SA's lockdown rules do not pass test of rationality". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  154. ^ Manuel, Trevor (10 May 2020). "Trevor Manuel: Let's not forsake our Constitution because of the lockdown". City Press. South Africa. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  155. ^ "From cigarettes to curfews: Who is suing government and why". News24. 18 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  156. ^ "DA asks Constitutional Court to declare Disaster Management Act unconstitutional". BusinessLIVE. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  157. ^ "FF Plus also heading to court to end lockdown". News24. 15 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  158. ^ "EFF slams relaxation of lockdown regulations on mines, ports and call centres". News24. 17 April 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  159. ^ a b "President Ramaphosa declares Ranch Resort COVID-19 free". sanews.gov.za. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  160. ^ a b "Repatriated citizens to be reunited with families". SANews.gov.zanews24.com. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  161. ^ "Coronavirus: SAA Airbus carrying 114 SA citizens repatriated from Wuhan lands in Polokwane". News24. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  162. ^ a b "Sick South Africans left behind in Wuhan, confirms Mkhize". thesouthafrican.com. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  163. ^ "Repatriated South Africans arrive home". sanews.gov.za. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  164. ^ "This is why a Limpopo resort was chosen". news24.com. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  165. ^ a b c d e Davis, Rebecca. "Coronavirus Analysis: Is the deployment of Cuban doctors to SA justified?". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  166. ^ a b "Cuban doctors came at our request – Minister of Health". News24. 29 April 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  167. ^ "Here's where the Cuban doctors will be deployed to fight Covid-19". TimesLIVE. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  168. ^ "COVID-19: DA wants govt to prioritise SA health workers". eNCA. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  169. ^ "US criticises South Africa's use of Cuban doctors in fight against Covid-19". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  170. ^ Mabena, Charles Cilliers and Sipho. "Cuba rejects report that its doctors will get R440m from SA as a 'smear' from the USA". The Citizen. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  171. ^ News, A. B. C. "US gives 'up to 1,000' ventilators to South Africa for virus". ABC News. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  172. ^ "South Africa receives medical supplies from China". People's Daily. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  173. ^ "Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize receives PPE donations from Ithuba Holdings". COVID-19 Corona Virus South African Resource Portal. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  174. ^ "SA economy could crater up to 10% this year". Moneyweb. 25 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  175. ^ "Eskom will keep the lights on during 21-day lockdown". 28 March 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  176. ^ a b "SA's "big bazooka" stimulus package explained". Investec. Retrieved 13 May 2020.
  177. ^ Mjo, Odwa (13 March 2020). "MARKET WRAP: JSE has worst week since 1998 as pandemic plagues investors". BusinessLIVE. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  178. ^ Mar 2020, Suren Naidoo / 19 (19 March 2020). "Repo rate slashed by 1%". Moneyweb. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  179. ^ "Reserve Bank announces surprise rate cut of another 100 basis points". BusinessTech. 14 April 2020. Retrieved 6 July 2020.
  180. ^ "Coronavirus: Standard Bank gives businesses, students a debt holiday". Business Insider. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  181. ^ Welle (www.dw.com), Deutsche (9 June 2020). "COVID-19: South Africa's social divide and economic woes exposed". DW.COM. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  182. ^ Haffajee, Ferial (15 July 2020). "Covid-19's Impact: The day the bottom fell out of South Africa – a triple pandemic has hit us". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  183. ^ Brown, Justin (16 July 2020). "Covid-19: Children eat wild plants to survive as hunger explodes". GroundUp News. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  184. ^ a b Magome, Mogomotsi (26 July 2020). "South Africa warns COVID-19 corruption puts 'lives at risk'". Washington Post. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  185. ^ a b "Overpriced masks, sanitiser and emergency scooters: South Africa launches coronavirus corruption probe". abc.net.au. 26 July 2020. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  186. ^ a b Nortier, Christi (23 July 2020). "CORONAVIRUS DAILY DIGEST #105: Ramaphosa takes tough stance on corruption, schools reclose for a month, and pandemic's official death toll is cast into doubt". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  187. ^ Knoetze, Daneel (14 April 2020). "Covid-19: Lockdown creates ripe pickings for corrupt police". GroundUp News. GroundUp. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  188. ^ Mandela, Nomalizo (6 July 2020). "SIU to investigate transactions from Relief Fund, finalising COVID-19 proclamation". SABC News - Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  189. ^ Pitjeng, Refilwe. "Super Rugby suspended over coronavirus concerns". ewn.co.za. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  190. ^ "Coronavirus: Guinness PRO14 season suspended until further notice". skysports.com. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  191. ^ "Statement by FNB Varsity Cup". varsitycup.co.za. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  192. ^ "SAFA hits back with FINAL call on PSL matches". Sport. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  193. ^ "ASA postpone all athletics events in South Africa because of coronavirus". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  194. ^ "Sunshine Tour suspend all golf events in South Africa". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  195. ^ "Wimpy Lifesaving South Africa National Championships cancelled". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  196. ^ "We will get through this together". blog.parkrun.com. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  197. ^ "The Official Statement regarding the cancellation of the 2020 Absa Cape Epic". cape-epic.com. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  198. ^ "Two Oceans Marathon cancelled amid coronavirus pandemic". News24. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  199. ^ "Africa's Two Oceans Marathon cancelled amid coronavirus pandemic". iBusiness. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  200. ^ "Comrades Marathon cancelled due to Covid-19". News24. Sport24. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  201. ^ "Plans revised for HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series 2021". World Rugby HSBC Sevens Series. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  202. ^ "Cape Town Sevens cancelled due to Covid-19". News24. Sport24. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  203. ^ "CORONAVIRUS: LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL EVENTS CANCELLED". EWN. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  204. ^ "Bloem Show on hold for now". News24. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  205. ^ Alex, Alex. "AfrikaBurn 2020 cancelled". News24. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  206. ^ "Coronavirus Fears Prompt Postponement of CT International Jazz Festival". EWN. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  207. ^ "[UPDATE] CT Jazz Fest will definitely happen at later stage, says Billy Domingo". CapeTalk. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  208. ^ "KKNK not going ahead as planned • KKNK". KKNK. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  209. ^ "New dates for 2020 Splashy Fen Music Festival". South Coast Sun. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  210. ^ Isaacs, Alex (17 March 2020). "Rand Show postponed following coronavirus pandemic reaching SA". Channel. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  211. ^ "Stand by for the first-ever virtual NAF". 17 March 2020. Archived from the original on 21 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  212. ^ "Scifest Africa 2020 Postponed". 17 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  213. ^ "WWE Reschedules Upcoming South Africa Tour Due To Coronavirus". ProWrestling.com. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  214. ^ "Comic Con Cape Town postponed to 2021". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  215. ^ Isaacs, Alex (16 March 2020). "Lighthouse Family SA tour postponed due to coronavirus pandemic". Channel. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  216. ^ Isaacs, Alex (16 March 2020). "Boyz II Men South African tour and the Scorpion Kings Live concerts postponed due to coronavirus pandemic". Channel. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  217. ^ Mvelashe, Phakamani (16 March 2020). "Bebe Winans' SA tour postponed". Channel. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  218. ^ "HuntEx2020 | Ten Years Inspiring Adventure". huntex.net. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  219. ^ "HOME". Decorex Africa. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  220. ^ "Tyrexpo Africa 2020". tyrexpoafrica.com. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  221. ^ "Event Postponement | Power & Electricity". Power & Electricity World Africa 2020. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  222. ^ Ngcakani, Noluthando (16 March 2020). "COVID-19: Farmers urged to protect themselves, workers". Food For Mzansi. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  223. ^ "Trips to Moria on hold until further notice over coronavirus pandemic, ZCC tells congregants". news24.com. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  224. ^ "Coronavirus: MJC suspends Jumuah prayers, but no call to close mosques". News24. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  225. ^ "South Africa's shuls close to stop spread of coronavirus". South Africa Jewish Report. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  226. ^ Sizani, Mkhuseli. "Coronavirus: Traditional circumcision schools in Eastern Cape suspended". News24.
  227. ^ "City of Joburg closes all public facilities, including pools, theatres and the zoo". The Citizen. News24 Wire. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  228. ^ "Durban bans swimming at the beach". businesstech.co.za. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  229. ^ Chothia, Andrea. "City of Cape Town will shut down these facilities due to coronavirus". Blue Sky Publications. The South African. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  230. ^ Williams, Murray. "Oldest pub in SA 'The Percy' shuts up shop as lockdown takes its toll". News24. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  231. ^ "Cape Town's 212-year-old pub Perseverance is 'calling last rounds' says owner". CapeTalk. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  232. ^ "More lockdown looting in the Western Cape as police race to protect shops". News24. 22 April 2020. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  233. ^ TimesLIVE and Kgaugelo Masweneng (14 April 2020). "Police help Cape bottle stores move stock as looting spreads to food shops".
  234. ^ Siviwe Breakfast (14 April 2020). "Watch: More lockdown looting in Cape Town [video]".
  235. ^ "Covid-19: Bio-Hazard Warning As Truck Carrying Samples Hijacked In Port Elizabeth". howsouthafrica.com. 21 July 2020.
  236. ^ Dayimani, Malibongwe. "Bio-hazard warning after truck carrying Covid-19 samples hijacked in Port Elizabeth". news24. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  237. ^ "Coronavirus: Top South African HIV scientist dies". BBC News. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  238. ^ Heywood, Mark. "Dr Clarence Mini (1951–2020): A champion for health and human rights". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 15 May 2020.
  239. ^ Seleka, Ntwaagae. "Tributes continue to pour in for Clarence Mini who died of Covid-19". News24. Retrieved 15 May 2020.
  240. ^ "Cameraman Lungile Tom Brought Parliament to Homes of South Africans – Parliament of South Africa". parliament.gov.za. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  241. ^ "eMedia Investments mourns the loss of top cameraman". eNCA. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  242. ^ Eloff, Herman. "Iconic SA author Elsa Joubert, 97, dies of Covid-19". Arts. Retrieved 14 June 2020.
  243. ^ Ho, Ufrieda. "Nomandla Yako, the HIV/Aids activist who 'planted hope'". Maverick Citizen. Retrieved 30 June 2020.
  244. ^ Gontsana, Mary-Anne. "Nomandla Yako, who defied Thabo Mbeki by importing HIV medicines, has died". GroupUp. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
  245. ^ "North West Cogta MEC dies from Covid-pneumonia". IOL. Mahikeng. 6 July 2020. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  246. ^ Etheridge, Jenna. "Western Cape municipal mayor dies from Covid-19". News24. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  247. ^ "ANC KZN spokesperson Ricardo Mthembu dies of Covid-19". IOL. 8 July 2020. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  248. ^ Dayimani, Malibongwe; Ngqakamba, Ngqakamba. "AmaRharhabe Kingdom Queen Noloyiso Sandile dies of Covid-19". News24. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  249. ^ "Former Springbok wing dies of Covid-19 complications". Sport. Retrieved 10 July 2020.
  250. ^ Chabalala, Chabalala. "Covid-19 reaches 'doorstep of the judiciary' - Eastern Cape judge dies after testing positive". News24. Retrieved 13 July 2020.
  251. ^ Buffalo City Council Speaker Alfred Mitsi dies of COVID-19 complications
  252. ^ https://www.sabcnews.com/sabcnews/zindzi-mandela-tested-positive-for-the-coronavirus-family-awaiting-autopsy-report/
  253. ^ "ANC MP Martha Mmola dies of Covid-related illness". TimesLIVE. 19 July 2020. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  254. ^ Ferreira, Thinus. "Legendary SA casting director Moonyeenn Lee dies from Covid-19 complications". Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  255. ^ Ray, Craig. "Chapter closes for 'encyclopaedia of SA Rugby'". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  256. ^ "ANC MP Zamuxolo Peter died after testing positive for Covid-19". News24. 1 August 2020. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  257. ^ a b c Davis, Rebecca. "Coronavirus Fact Check#1: Viral outbreak: Fake news spreads in SA in tandem with Covid-19". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  258. ^ a b "FAKE NEWS: No, Covid-19 testing kits are not contaminated". News24. 6 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  259. ^ a b "Bill Gates, Trevor Noah, death threats & that vaccine: how it all went wrong". TimesLIVE. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  260. ^ "Apology to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for 'Africa vaccine' story". News24. 5 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  261. ^ Cilliers, Charles. "Zweli Mkhize says '5G causing Covid-19 deaths' is just fake news". The Citizen. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  262. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (06th July 2020)". sacoronavirus.co.za. Retrieved 6 July 2020.
  263. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  264. ^ Mkhize, Zwelini (8 March 2020). "Third confirmed case of COVID-19 in South Africa". NICD. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  265. ^ "Health updates on Coronavirus on 9 March 2020". Department of Health. 9 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  266. ^ "COVID-19 SITUATIONAL REPORT No. 35" (PDF). NICD. 10 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  267. ^ Mkhize, Zwelini (11 March 2020). "Latest confirmed cases of COVID-19 in South Africa". NICD. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  268. ^ "Coronavirus in SA: Mkhize confirms Free State case not positive". eNCA. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  269. ^ "Dr Zweli Mkhize on latest confirmed cases of Coronavirus COVID-19 in South Africa". Department of Health. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  270. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  271. ^ "Dr Zweli Mkhize confirms eight more cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  272. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  273. ^ "Dr Zweli Mkhize confirms latest Coronavirus COVID-19 cases in South Africa". Department of Health. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  274. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  275. ^ "Dr Zweli Mkhize confirms 13 more Coronavirus COVID-19 cases in South Africa". Department of Health. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  276. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  277. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 16 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  278. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  279. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  280. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  281. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  282. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  283. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 23 more cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  284. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  285. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  286. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 52 more cases of Coronavirus Covid-19". Department of Health. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  287. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 38 more cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 21 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  288. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 21 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  289. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 21 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  290. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  291. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  292. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 128 more cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  293. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  294. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 554 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  295. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 25 March 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  296. ^ @nicd_sa (25 March 2020). "NEW CASES: We confirm 155 new cases of #COVID19. Individual behavior is key to containing the spread of the virus, and involves taking personal responsibility for measures, such as regular hygiene practices, early self-isolation and personal social distancing.pic.twitter.com/kiwmr7pqJv". Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  297. ^ "927 confirmed coronavirus cases in South Africa". businesstech.co.za. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  298. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 26 March 2020. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  299. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  300. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 28 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  301. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  302. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms2nd death and total of 1280 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  303. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  304. ^ "1,326 confirmed coronavirus cases in South Africa – with three deaths". BusinessTech. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  305. ^ a b "COVID-19 update". NICD. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  306. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  307. ^ "1,353 confirmed coronavirus cases in South Africa – as deaths climb to 5". BusinessTech. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  308. ^ "Minister of Zweli Mkhize: Launch of mobile laboratories". Department of Health. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  309. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  310. ^ "Mkhize announces larger jump in confirmed Covid-19 cases in SA, to 1,462". The Citizen. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  311. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  312. ^ Raborife, Mpho (2 April 2020). "Number of people testing positive for Covid-19 increased by 82 to 1 462 - Mkhize". 24.com. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  313. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  314. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 7 deaths and total of 1505 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
  315. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 1 585 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 4 April 2020. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
  316. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 5 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  317. ^ a b "COVID-19 update". NICD. 6 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  318. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 5 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  319. ^ "Mkhize announces total Covid-19 infections in SA now at 1,749, with one more death". The Citizen. 7 April 2020. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  320. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 18 deaths and total of 1845 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 8 April 2020. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  321. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 8 April 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  322. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 9 April 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  323. ^ "WATCH LIVE: Ramaphosa extends Covid-19 lockdown by 14 days". The Citizen. 9 April 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  324. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 10 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  325. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 11 April 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  326. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 25 deaths and total of 2028 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 11 April 2020. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  327. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 2 173 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 12 April 2020. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  328. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 12 April 2020. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  329. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 13 April 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  330. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 2 415 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 14 April 2020. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  331. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 14 April 2020. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  332. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 15 April 2020. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  333. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 15 April 2020. Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  334. ^ "COVID-19". NICD. 16 April 2020. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  335. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (16th April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 16 April 2020. Retrieved 16 April 2020.
  336. ^ "903 people have recovered from coronavirus in SA". Independent Media. 16 April 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  337. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 17 April 2020. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  338. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (17th April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 17 April 2020. Retrieved 17 April 2020.
  339. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 3 034 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 18 April 2020. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  340. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 18 April 2020. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  341. ^ "Covid-19 in SA: Death toll at 52, as cases rise to 3 034". 24.com. 18 April 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  342. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 3 158 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 19 April 2020. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  343. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 19 April 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  344. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 20 April 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  345. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (20th April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 20 April 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  346. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 21 April 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  347. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (21st April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 21 April 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  348. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 3 635 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 22 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  349. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 22 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  350. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (22nd April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 22 April 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  351. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 3 953 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 23 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  352. ^ "COVID-19". NICD. 23 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  353. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (23rd April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 23 April 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  354. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 4 220 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 24 April 2020. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  355. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 24 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  356. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 24 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  357. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 4 361 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 25 April 2020. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  358. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 26 April 2020. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  359. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (23rd April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 27 April 2020. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  360. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 4 996 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 28 April 2020. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  361. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 28 April 2020. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  362. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (28th April 2020) with Media Presentation". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 28 April 2020. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  363. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 5 350 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 29 April 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  364. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (29th April 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 29 April 2020. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  365. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 5 647 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 30 April 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  366. ^ "COVID-19 update". NICD. 30 April 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  367. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 6 783 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 3 May 2020. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  368. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (1st May 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 1 May 2020. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  369. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 6 336 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 2 May 2020. Retrieved 2 May 2020.
  370. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 7 220 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 4 May 2020. Retrieved 4 May 2020.
  371. ^ "COVID-19 Update". Department of Health. 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  372. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms 7 220 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 4 May 2020. Retrieved 4 May 2020.
  373. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in SA". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 5 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  374. ^ a b c "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 8 895 confirmed cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 8 May 2020. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  375. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (6th May 2020)". Department of Health. 6 May 2020. Retrieved 7 May 2020.
  376. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 8 232 confirmed cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 7 May 2020. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  377. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (7th May 2020)". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 7 May 2020. Retrieved 7 May 2020.
  378. ^ "COVID-19 weekly epidemiology brief" (PDF). NICD. 9 May 2020. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  379. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 9 420 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 9 May 2020. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  380. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 10 015 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 10 May 2020. Retrieved 11 May 2020.
  381. ^ "Update on Covid-19 (10th May 2020". COVID-19 South African Online Portal. 10 May 2020. Retrieved 11 May 2020.
  382. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 10 652 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 11 May 2020. Retrieved 11 May 2020.
  383. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 11 350 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 12 May 2020. Retrieved 13 May 2020.
  384. ^ "COVID-19 statistics in RSA". NICD. 12 May 2020. Retrieved 13 May 2020.
  385. ^ a b "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 12 074 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 13 May 2020. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  386. ^ "Statement by president Cyril Ramaphosa on South Africa's response to the coronavirus pandemic, 13 May 2020". Presidency of the republic of South Africa. 13 May 2020. Retrieved 13 May 2020.
  387. ^ "COVID-19 Update". NICD. 14 May 2020. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  388. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 13 524 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 15 May 2020. Retrieved 15 May 2020.
  389. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 14 355 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 16 May 2020. Retrieved 16 May 2020.
  390. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 15 515 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 17 May 2020. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  391. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 16 433 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 18 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  392. ^ "National COVID-19 daily report" (PDF). NICD. 18 May 2020. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  393. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 17 200 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 20 May 2020. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  394. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 18 003 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 20 May 2020. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  395. ^ "Minister Zweli Mkhize confirms total of 19 137 cases of Coronavirus COVID-19". Department of Health. 21 May 2020. Retrieved 21 May 2020.