COVID-19 pandemic in Virginia

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COVID-19 pandemic in Virginia
2020-03-27 18 23 57 Sign reading "In order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, this facility is CLOSED to the public until further notice" at Franklin Farm Park in the Franklin Farm section of Oak Hill, Fairfax County, Virginia.jpg
COVID-19 Cases in Virginia by counties.svg
Virginia counties by number of coronavirus cases as of June 1
  1–19 cases
  20–99 cases
  100–199 cases
  200–299
  >300 cases
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationVirginia, United States
Index caseFort Belvoir
Arrival dateMarch 7, 2020
Confirmed cases45,398[1]
Hospitalized cases1,371 (current)[2]
Critical cases347 (current)[2]
Ventilator cases188 (current)[2]
Recovered5,899 (previously hospitalized)[2]
Deaths
1,392[1]
Government website
www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

The COVID-19 pandemic in Virginia is part of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The first confirmed case was reported on March 7, 2020.[3] As of June 1, 2020, there have been 45,398 confirmed cases and 1,392 deaths reported in the U.S. state of Virginia (officially known as the Commonwealth of Virginia).[1][4][5][6]

Timeline[edit]

March[edit]

March 7–10[edit]

On March 7, Virginia confirmed its first case, a US Marine assigned to Fort Belvoir. He had recently traveled abroad.[3] On March 8, the state reported its second presumptive positive case, an 80-year-old man from Fairfax who had recently returned from a cruise on the Nile River.[7]

On March 9, the state reported 3 more presumptive positive cases: a man in his mid 60s from Arlington County who had recently travelled internationally,[8] a woman from Fairfax City who is the spouse of the patient reported the day before, and a Spotsylvania County resident.[9] This brings the total number of cases in the state to 5. On March 10, health officials in Loudoun County announced that a county resident tested presumptive positive for coronavirus.[10] During the same day, a Virginia Beach couple who traveled on a Nile River cruise was tested presumed positive, becoming the first two cases for Hampton Roads, bringing the state's total to eight.[11][12][13]

March 10–12[edit]

On March 11, the University of Virginia in Charlottesville announced that classes will be moved online beginning on March 19 "for the foreseeable future, quite possibly through the end of the semester."[14][15] Furthermore, administrators issued a blanket prohibition on "events with more than 100 people," saying that such events "should be postponed, cancelled, or offered virtually." The closure followed closely on the heels of the first confirmed case of coronavirus in Central Virginia in a teenager from Hanover County near Richmond who returned from international travel "to a country...[with] a Level 3 alert" on March 8. The teenager was reported to be "doing well" in isolation at home, and Hanover County Public Schools confirmed that the teenager is not a current student attending a public school in that county.[16]

On March 12, Governor Ralph S. Northam declared a state of emergency and cancelled out-of-state travel for public employees, after the state's total cases doubled since the last update. Several public school districts, including Loudoun County, Prince William County, Stafford County, and Fairfax County suspended classes.[17]

March 13–15[edit]

On March 13, the state's total cases increased by 13, raising the total sum of confirmed cases to 30. Governor Ralph Northam suspended all K–12 schools in the state for a minimum of two weeks.[18]

On the evening of March 14, the Virginia Department of Health announced the number of positive cases had increased to 41.[19] They also announced the state's first death from the coronavirus: a man in his 70s who died of respiratory failure. The county where the man died was not released, but it was announced he was from the Peninsula Health District.[20][21] The same day, the College of William & Mary announced that a member of staff had tested positive for the disease.[22]

On March 15, Virginia Department of Health announced the number of positive cases had increased to 45, Fairfax County has the most cases among Virginia's counties with 10 confirmed cases.[23]

March 16–20[edit]

On March 16, the University of Virginia confirmed its first case, a member of staff in her late 50s.[24][25] The Virginia Department of Health announced an additional six positive cases of coronavirus in the state, as well as the state's second death. The man who died was in his 70s from the Peninsula region and died of respiratory failure.[26] These cases increased the number of positive cases to 51.[27]

On March 19, Virginia reported its first coronavirus case in a minor, a child under the age of 10 in Gloucester County.[28]

On March 20, Governor Northam activated the Virginia National Guard and elements of the Virginia Defense Force.[29][30] The state announced they have 114 cases of COVID-19, with 20 hospitalizations.[29]

March 23[edit]

On March 23, Governor Northam closed all public and private schools until the end of the academic year.[31][32] Jerry Falwell, Jr. announced that Liberty University was reopening its dorms to students who wished to return to campus from spring break even though classes were being taught online. University staff and faculty have also been told to report to work.[33][34] Both decisions remain controversial.[35]

March 30[edit]

During the afternoon of March 30, Governor Northam issued a stay-at-home order, to be effective until June 10 unless amended or rescinded by a further executive order. Maryland's Governor Larry Hogan and the District of Columbia's Mayor Muriel Bowser issued similar orders on the same day (see COVID-19 pandemic in Maryland and in Washington, D.C.).[36]

April[edit]

A metal COVID-19 sign at a park in Vienna, Virginia

April 3[edit]

On Friday April 3, Governor Northam announced that the Dulles Expo Center will be the interim site of the first field hospital in Northern Virginia. A total of three field hospitals are expected to open throughout the Commonwealth. The Dulles Expo site is expected to be operational by mid-May.[37]

April 13[edit]

On Monday April 13, Reuters reported that 42 of the 154 COVID-19 deaths in Virginia occurred at the Canterbury Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center in Henrico County, a nursing home located near Richmond. The outbreak is one of the worst coronavirus disease clusters in the United States.[38][39]

Projections[edit]

A number of organizations have produced models that project the trajectory of the coronavirus outbreak.[40] The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle has constructed one of these (the IHME model).[41] Penn Medicine, a consortium of the Perelman School of Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia, has constructed another, the COVID-19 Hospital Impact Model for Epidemics (CHIME).[42] Among other things, the two models differ in the methods by which they calculate the effectiveness of social distancing in reducing the number of new COVID-19 infections.[43]

As of April 6, the CHIME was projecting that the peak hospital impact of the COVID-19 outbreak would occur in Northern Virginia at the end of June.[44] On April 24, the IHME projected that Virginia's hospital resource use and numbers of deaths per day due to COVID-19 had reached their peaks.[45]

Government responses[edit]

On March 10, Fairfax County Public Schools announced that they would close on March 13 and March 16 to begin the transition to online classes if the school system would need to shut down.[46] On March 15, it was announced that all schools and school administration buildings in Fairfax County would close until April 10.[47]

A restaurant in Clarendon, Arlington, Virginia offering only take-out options on March 18

On March 12, Governor Northam declared a state of emergency. The declaration activated the Virginia Emergency Operations Center, banned price gouging, activated the Virginia National Guard to State Active duty, and authorized $10,000,000 to be used for any recovery and/or response efforts in the state due to the coronavirus. Northam stated that local school districts were allowed to make their own decisions about closing schools.[17]

The Code of Virginia permits officials of local jurisdictions that have issued declarations of local emergencies to, among other things, "control, restrict, allocate or regulate the use, sale, production and distribution of food, fuel, clothing and other commodities, materials, goods, services and resource systems which fall only within the boundaries of that jurisdiction and which do not impact systems affecting adjoining or other political subdivisions".[48] On March 13, the Arlington County Manager signed such a declaration, which the Arlington County Board ratified on March 14.[49]

Other local jurisdictions in Northern Virginia took similar actions:

March 13: The Chairman of the Madison County Board of Supervisors declared a local emergency that the full Board ratified on March 26.[50]
March 14: The Alexandria City Manager declared a local emergency that the Alexandria City Council approved on the same day.[51] The Stephens City Town Council declared a state of emergency.[52]
March 16: The Prince William County Executive/Director of Emergency Management declared a state of local emergency.[53] The Loudoun County Administrator issued a declaration of local emergency that the County's Board of Supervisors ratified on March 18.[54] The Fauquier County Administrator declared a local emergency effective March 17.[55] The Stafford County Administrator declared a local state of emergency.[56] A local emergency that the Falls Church City Council declared became effective.[57] The City of Fredericksburg issued a declaration of local emergency.[58] The Purcellville Town Manager announced a declaration of local emergency, which the Town Council was scheduled to ratify on March 24.[59]
March 17: The Fairfax County Executive signed and the County's Board of Supervisors consented to a declaration of a local state of emergency.[60] The Rappahannock County Administrator, acting as the Director of Emergency Management, declared a local state of emergency.[61] Spotsylvania County declared a local state of emergency.[62] The Clarke County Board of Supervisors adopted a declaration of local emergency.[63] The Culpeper County Board of Supervisors declared a local state of emergency.[64] The Warren County Local Director of Emergency Management issued a declaration of local emergency, to which the County's Board of Supervisors consented on the same day.[65] The Page County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution containing a declaration of a local emergency.[66] The Shenandoah County Administrator declared a local emergency, which the County's Board of Supervisors was scheduled to ratify on March 24.[67] The Mayor and City Council of the City of Fairfax adopted a declaration of local emergency.[68] The Manassas City Manager signed a declaration of local state of emergency.[69] The interim City Manager of Winchester declared a state of emergency for the city.[70]
March 18: The Leesburg Town Council consented to a declaration of local emergency to be issued by the Town Manager, acting in his capacity as the Director of Emergency Management.[71]
March 19: The Frederick County Administrator declared a state of emergency.[72]
March 23: The Front Royal Town Council declared a "COVID-19 Emergency Ordinance".[73]

During the afternoon of March 17, Governor Northam issued an order allowing law enforcement to enforce a ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in public spaces; earlier in the day, he had appeared unwilling to take such measures.[74] Some restaurant owners had previously expressed dissatisfaction with the lack of direction provided by the government.[75]

On March 19, Virginia officials asked law enforcement to avoid arrests where possible. The administration also asked magistrates and judges to consider alternatives to incarceration.[76]

On March 23, Northam issued an order that banned within Virginia all gatherings of more than 10 people. The order required all public schools to be closed for the remainder of the current school year. The order also closed all public access to recreational and entertainment businesses, such as bowling alleys, gyms, and theaters.[77]

The March 23 order closed "dining and congregation areas" in restaurants, dining establishments, food courts, farmers markets, breweries, microbreweries, distilleries, wineries and tasting rooms, but left open all other areas in those types of businesses. The order also left open certain specified "essential retail businesses" including pharmacies, grocery stores, and banks (among others).[77] On March 26, an Alexandria pub — that a COVID-19 positive person had visited on March 10, March 14, and March 15 — reportedly said on its Facebook page that it was closed only through March 28 for cleaning and sanitizing.[78]

The March 23 order stated that all "essential" retail establishments must, to the extent possible, adhere to social distancing recommendations, enhanced sanitizing practices on common surfaces, and other appropriate workplace guidance from state and federal authorities. The order also stated that any brick-and-mortar retail business not listed in the order as "essential" must limit all in-person shopping to no more than 10 patrons per establishment, adhere to social distancing recommendations, sanitize common surfaces, and apply relevant workplace guidance from state and federal authorities. The order stated that if any such business cannot adhere to the 10-patron limit with proper social distancing requirements, it must close.[77]

Northam's March 23 order did not define construction activity as being "essential".[79] However, the Washington Post reported on March 28 that the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia had designated construction as well as several other types of businesses as essential. The Post reported that construction projects were still underway in those jurisdictions and that a spokesperson for Northam had claimed that the federal government had determined that construction is essential.[80] The Post also reported that the State of Washington's transportation department had suspended work on nearly all of its projects and that Washington's governor had clarified his stay-at-home order to state that construction was not considered an essential activity.[80]

The United States Department of Homeland Security's March 28 guidance on essential critical infrastructure lists as "essential" the construction of residential/shelter facilities and services (see "essential services"), energy-related facilities, communications and information technology, public works including the construction of critical or strategic infrastructure and infrastructure that is temporarily required to support COVID-19 response, is for certain other types of community- or government-based operations, or is otherwise critical, strategic, or essential. The guidance does not contain any such listings for other types of construction.[81]

On March 25, Northam and the State Health Commissioner issued a public health emergency order that prohibited inpatient and outpatient surgical hospitals, free-standing endoscopy centers, physicians' offices, and dental, orthodontic, and endodontic offices from providing procedures and surgeries that require personal protective equipment (PPE), which if delayed, are not anticipated to cause harm to the patient by negatively affecting the patient's health outcomes, or leading to disability or death. The prohibition did not include outpatient visits delivered in hospital-based clinics.[82]

On March 30, Northam issued a stay-at-home order, to remain effective until June 10 unless amended or rescinded. The order required everyone to remain at their place of residence, with certain specified exceptions (including traveling to work, to obtain food and for outdoor exercise).[36]

On April 10, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle reported that Virginia had not implemented a closure of non-essential services.[83] The Institute further reported that Maryland and the District of Columbia had implemented these closures on March 23 and March 25, respectively.[84]

On April 15, the March 13 order, which would initially expire on April 23, was extended to end on May 8. The order for all residents to stay-at-home until June 10 was still in place.[85]

On April 16, demonstrators gathered in Richmond's Capitol Square in front of the Executive Mansion to protest Northam's closure and stay at home orders.[86] On April 24, Northam presented a four-staged "Forward Virginia" blueprint informed by "diverse health and business stakeholders" to "safely" ease public health restrictions related to the spread of COVID 19.[87]

Impact on sports[edit]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[88] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[89]

On March 17, it was announced that the Virginia Gold Cup, scheduled for May 2, would be postponed to June 20.[90]

Statistics[edit]

County [a] Cases [b] Hosp. Deaths Pop. (2020) Cases per 100k
130 / 133 43,611 4,601 1,370 8,286,378 526.30
Accomack 863 48 12 32,973 2,617.29
Albemarle 187 19 8 105,703 176.91
Alexandria[c] 1,960 187 44 147,391 1,329.80
Alleghany 32 9 4 15,677 204.12
Amelia 25 8 1 12,903 193.75
Amherst 27 3 0 31,914 84.60
Appomattox 31 1 0 15,414 201.11
Arlington 2,107 371 113 229,164 919.43
Augusta 109 2 1 74,314 146.67
Bath 0 0 0 4,470 0.00
Bedford 51 2 2 77,724 65.61
Bland 0 0 0 6,561 0.00
Botetourt 32 9 4 33,347 95.96
Bristol[c] 4 1 0 17,367 23.03
Brunswick 25 6 1 16,698 149.72
Buchanan 18 0 0 22,776 79.03
Buckingham 456 16 3 17,032 2,677.31
Buena Vista[c] 13 1 0 6,349 204.76
Campbell 18 4 1 55,086 32.68
Caroline 64 5 2 29,984 213.44
Carroll 91 3 1 29,724 306.15
Charles City 27 10 1 7,040 383.52
Charlotte 23 4 0 12,201 188.51
Charlottesville[c] 108 15 3 45,049 239.74
Chesapeake[c] 520 87 15 222,209 234.01
Chesterfield 1,461 78 35 335,687 435.23
Clarke 25 3 0 14,363 174.06
Colonial Heights[c] 91 10 17 16,897 538.56
Covington[c] 4 0 0 6,303 63.46
Craig 5 0 0 5,211 95.95
Culpeper 674 46 6 49,432 1,363.49
Cumberland 37 4 0 9,719 380.70
Danville[c] 51 15 2 48,411 105.35
Dickenson 0 0 0 15,115 0.00
Dinwiddie 77 12 0 27,852 276.46
Emporia[c] 78 13 5 5,665 1,376.88
Essex 46 4 0 11,130 413.30
Fairfax 10,906 1,300 383 1,142,234 954.80
Fairfax[c] 65 8 6 21,498 302.35
Falls Church[c] 55 11 8 12,332 445.99
Fauquier 312 21 6 68,782 453.61
Floyd 6 2 0 15,651 31.95
Fluvanna 91 23 6 26,235 346.86
Franklin[c] 42 3 2 8,346 502.24
Franklin 36 4 1 56,264 63.98
Frederick 344 22 4 83,199 413.47
Fredericksburg[c] 158 19 0 24,286 650.58
Galax[c] 112 4 0 6,837 1,638.15
Giles 5 0 0 16,708 29.93
Gloucester 31 8 1 37,143 83.46
Goochland 96 18 6 22,253 431.40
Grayson 37 4 0 16,012 231.08
Greene 34 4 1 19,162 177.43
Greensville 73 14 7 11,885 614.22
Halifax 30 3 0 35,125 85.41
Hampton[c] 197 30 3 146,437 134.53
Hanover 322 50 24 103,227 311.93
Harrisonburg[c] 774 57 23 40,468 1,912.62
Henrico 1,754 201 133 325,155 539.44
Henry 104 9 3 51,881 200.46
Highland 3 0 0 2,214 135.50
Hopewell[c] 87 11 0 22,354 389.19
Isle of Wight 128 12 3 36,314 352.48
James City 202 54 15 73,147 276.16
King and Queen 10 2 1 7,158 139.70
King George 65 14 4 25,515 254.75
King William 30 3 0 16,269 184.40
Lancaster 10 1 0 10,965 91.20
Lee 9 1 0 24,742 36.38
Lexington[c] 7 0 0 6,867 101.94
Loudoun 2,529 162 62 375,629 673.27
Louisa 78 9 1 34,602 225.42
Lunenburg 13 0 0 12,299 105.70
Lynchburg[c] 80 6 1 65,269 122.57
Madison 40 3 1 13,134 304.55
Manassas[c] 1,046 64 10 40,605 2,576.04
Manassas Park[c] 299 29 6 14,273 2094.86
Martinsville[c] 31 6 1 15,416 201.09
Mathews 5 2 0 8,862 56.42
Mecklenburg 217 29 21 31,081 698.18
Middlesex 15 1 0 10,606 141.43
Montgomery 73 9 1 97,653 74.75
Nelson 17 0 0 14,785 114.98
New Kent 36 6 1 20,392 176.54
Newport News[c] 258 40 10 180,726 142.76
Norfolk[c] 490 69 6 245,782 199.36
Northampton 230 27 20 12,155 1,892.23
Northumberland 25 0 1 12,232 204.38
Norton[c] 2 2 0 3,904 51.23
Nottoway 28 5 0 15,673 178.65
Orange 101 7 1 35,385 285.43
Page 219 24 21 23,726 923.04
Patrick 18 0 0 18,045 99.75
Petersburg[c] 127 23 3 33,740 376.41
Pittsylvania 17 8 1 62,194 27.33
Poquoson[c] 7 2 0 11,566 60.52
Portsmouth[c] 307 44 11 96,470 318.23
Powhatan 32 0 0 28,031 114.16
Prince Edward 134 10 2 22,952 583.83
Prince George 126 6 0 37,862 332.79
Prince William 5,412 460 104 451,721 1,198.08
Pulaski 19 4 0 34,332 55.34
Radford[c] 6 0 0 15,859 37.83
Rappahannock 13 1 0 7,378 176.20
Richmond[c] 1,249 149 24 210,309 593.88
Richmond 275 9 4 8,908 3,087.11
Roanoke[c] 155 9 9 94,911 163.31
Roanoke 275 9 4 94,409 291.29
Rockbridge 18 0 0 22,354 80.52
Rockingham 511 53 6 78,593 650.19
Russell 8 2 0 27,891 28.68
Salem[c] 34 3 3 24,747 137.39
Scott 7 2 2 22,126 31.64
Shenandoah 444 44 21 43,190 1028.02
Smyth 15 4 0 31,470 47.66
Southampton 146 6 2 18,109 806.23
Spotsylvania 524 40 7 130,475 401.61
Stafford 702 72 4 142,003 494.36
Staunton[c] 39 5 0 23,853 163.50
Suffolk[c] 314 50 32 63,677 493.11
Surry 10 3 1 6,709 149.05
Sussex 154 8 2 11,715 1,314.55
Tazewell 7 0 0 42,899 16.32
Virginia Beach[c] 699 92 23 447,021 156.37
Warren 155 14 2 39,083 396.59
Washington 51 8 4 54,591 93.42
Waynesboro[c] 43 2 0 19,520 220.29
Westmoreland 63 8 1 17,629 357.37
Williamsburg[c] 44 10 4 14,068 312.77
Winchester[c] 187 12 2 23,585 792.88
Wise 24 11 2 39,718 60.43
Wythe 21 1 1 29,119 72.12
York 72 9 3 67,837 106.14
Updated May 30, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Virginia Department of Health[91]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case were diagnosed, not where they reside. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed cases. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al An independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia

COVID-19 cases and deaths in Virginia[edit]

COVID-19 cases in Virginia, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases & recoveries
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-7
1(+100%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-8
2(+100%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-9
5(+150%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-10
8(+60%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-11
10(+25%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-12
17(+70%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-13
30(+76%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-14
41(+36%) 1
2020-03-15
45(+9%) 1
2020-03-16
51(+13%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-17
67(+31%) 2
2020-03-18
77(+15%) 2
2020-03-19
94(+22%) 2
2020-03-20
114(+21%) 2
2020-03-21
152(+33%) 2
2020-03-22
220(+44%) 3(+50%)
2020-03-23
254(+15.5%) 6(+100%)
2020-03-24
290(+14.2%) 9(+50%)
2020-03-25
391(+34.8%) 9
2020-03-26
460(+17.6%) 13(+44%)
2020-03-27
615(+33.7%) 15(+15%)
2020-03-28
739(+20.1%) 18(+20%)
2020-03-29
890(+20.4%) 22(+22%)
2020-03-30
1,020(+14.6%) 25(+14%)
2020-03-31
1,250(+22.6%) 27(+8%)
2020-04-01
1,484(+18.7%) 34(+26%)
2020-04-02
1,706(+15%) 41(+21%)
2020-04-03
2,012(+17.9%) 46(+12%)
2020-04-04
2,407(+19.6%) 51(+13%)
2020-04-05
2,637(+9.5%) 51(+0%)
2020-04-06
2,878(+9.1%) 54(+5.9%)
2020-04-07
3,333(+15.8%) 63(+16.7%)
2020-04-08
3,645(+9.4%) 75(+19.0%)
2020-04-09
4,042(+10.9%) 109(+45.3%)
2020-04-10
4,509(+11.6%) 121(+11.0%)
2020-04-11
5,077(+12.6%) 130(+7.4%)
2020-04-12
5,274(+3.8%) 141(+8.5%)
2020-04-13
5,747(+9%) 149(+5.7%)
2020-04-14
6,171(+7.4%) 154(+3.4%)
2020-04-15
6,500(+5.3%) 195(+26.6%)
2020-04-16
6,889(+6.0%) 208(+6.7%)
2020-04-17
7,491(+8.7%) 231(+11.1%)
2020-04-18
8,053(+7.6%) 258(+11.7%)
2020-04-19
8,537(+6.0%) 277(+7.4%)
2020-04-20
8,990(+5.3%) 300(+8.3%)
2020-04-21
9,630(+7.1%) 324(+8.0%)
2020-04-22
10,266(+6.6%) 329(+1.5%)
2020-04-23
10,998(+7.1%) 372(+13.1%)
2020-04-24
11,594(+5.4%) 410(+10.2%)
2020-04-25
12,366(+6.7%) 436(+6.3%)
2020-04-26
12,970(+4.9%) 448(+2.8%)
2020-04-27
13,535(+4.2%) 458(+2.2%)
2020-04-28
14,339(+5.9%) 492(+7.4%)
2020-04-29
14,961(+4.3%) 522(+6.1%)
2020-04-30
15,846(+5.9%) 552(+5.7%)
2020-05-01
16,901(+6.7%) 581(+5.3%)
2020-05-02
17,731(+4.9%) 616(+6.0%)
2020-05-03
18,671(+5.3%) 660(+7.1%)
2020-05-04
19,492(+4.4%) 684(+3.6%)
2020-05-05
20,256(+3.9%) 713(+4.2%)
2020-05-06
20,985(+3.5%) 737(+3.3%)
2020-05-07
21,570(+2.7%) 769(+4.2%)
2020-05-08
22,342(+3.6%) 812(+5.3%)
2020-05-09
23,196(+3.8%) 827(+1.8%)
2020-05-10
24,081(+3.8%) 839(+1.5%)
2020-05-11
25,070(+4.1%) 850(+1.3%)
2020-05-12
25,800(+2.9%) 891(+4.8%)
2020-05-13
26,746(+3.7%) 927(+4.0%)
2020-05-14
27,813(+4.0%) 955(+3.0%)
2020-05-15
28,672(+3.1%) 977(+2.3%)
2020-05-16
29,683(+3.5%) 1,002(+2.6%)
2020-05-17
30,388(+2.4%) 1,009(+0.7%)
2020-05-18
31,140(+2.5%) 1,014(+0.5%)
2020-05-19
32,145(+3.2%) 1,041(+2.7%)
2020-05-20
32,908(+2.4%) 1,074(+3.2%)
2020-05-21
34,137(+3.7%) 1,099(+2.3%)
2020-05-22
34,950(+2.4%) 1,136(+3.4%)
2020-05-23
35,749(+2.3%) 1,159(+2.0%)
2020-05-24
36,244(+1.4%) 1,171(+1.0%)
2020-05-25
37,727(+4.1%) 1,208(+3.2%)
2020-05-26
39,342(+4.3%) 1,236(+2.3%)
2020-05-27
40,249(+2.3%) 1,281(+3.6%)
2020-05-28
41,401(+2.8%) 1,338(+4.4%)
2020-05-29
42,533(+2.7%) 1,358(+1.5%)
2020-05-30
43,611(+2.5%) 1,370(+0.9%)
2020-05-31
44,607(+2.3%) 1,375(+0.4%)
2020-06-01
45,398(+1.8%) 1,392(+1.2%)
2020-06-02
46,239(+1.9%) 1,407(+1.1%)
Source: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

Age ranges and ethnicities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "COVID-19 in Virginia". Virginia Department of Health. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d "COVID-19 in Virginia Hospitals". Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "US Marine in Virginia tests positive for coronavirus". March 7, 2020. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2020.
  4. ^ "The Latest: Virginia has 739 confirmed cases of the coronavirus". WRIC. March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  5. ^ "64 new coronavirus cases in Virginia, now 462 total statewide deaths". WSLS10. March 26, 2020. Archived from the original on March 26, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
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    (2) "Governor Northam Declares State of Emergency, Outlines Additional Measures to Combat COVID-19" (Press release). Richmond, Virginia: Commonwealth of Virginia: Office of the Governor. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
    (3) Northam, Ralph S. (March 12, 2020). "Executive Order Number Fifty-One (2020): Declaration Of A State of Emergency Due To Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)" (PDF). Richmond, Virginia: Commonwealth of Virginia: Office of the Governor. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020. The anticipated effects of COVID-19 constitute a disaster as described in § 44–146.16 of the Code of Virginia (Code). By virtue of the authority vested in me by Article V, Section 7 of the Constitution of Virginia, by §§ 44–146.17 and 44–75.1 of the Code, as Governor and Director of Emergency Management and Commander-in-Chief of the Commonwealth's armed forces, I proclaim a state of emergency. Accordingly, I direct state and local governments to render appropriate assistance to prepare for this event, to alleviate any conditions resulting from the situation, and to implement recovery and mitigation operations and activities so as to return impacted areas to pre-event conditions as much as possible. Emergency services shall be conducted in accordance with § 44–146.13 et seq. of the Code.
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    (2) Stewart, Caleb (March 30, 2020). "Gov. Northam issues 'stay at home' order for Virginians amid COVID-19 outbreak". Harrisonburg, Virginia: WHSV-TV. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
    (3) Olivo, Antonio; Wiggins, Ovetta; Schneider, Gregory S. (March 30, 2020). "Hogan, Northam, Bowser order residents in Maryland, Virginia, D.C. to stay at home". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
    (4) Northam, Ralph S. (March 30, 2020). "Executive Order Number Fifty-Five (2020): Temporary Stay At Home Order Due to Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)" (PDF). Richmond, Virginia: Commonwealth of Virginia: Office of the Governor. Retrieved March 30, 2020. To reinforce the Commonwealth's response to COVID-19 and in furtherance of Executive Orders 51 (March 12, 2020) and 53 (March 23, 2020) and by virtue of the authority vested in me by Article V, Section 7 of the Constitution of Virginia, by § 44–146.17 of the Code of Virginia, I order the following:
    1. All individuals in Virginia shall remain at their place of residence, except as provided below by this Order and Executive Order 53. To the extent individuals use shared or outdoor spaces, whether on land or on water, they must at all times maintain social distancing of at least six feet from any other person, with the exception of family or household members or caretakers. Individuals may leave their residences for the purpose of: ....
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  49. ^ (1) "County Manager Declares Local Emergency in Response to Coronavirus" (Press release). Arlington County Government. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
    (2) Schwartz, Mark (March 13, 2020). "County Manager's Declaration of Local Emergency" (PDF). Arlington County, Virginia, Government. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020. Under the authority of the Code of Virginia § 44–146.21, the County Manager has declared a Local Emergency.
    (3) "BREAKING: Arlington County Declares Local Emergency". ARLnow. ARLnow.com. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  50. ^ (1) Jackson, R. Clay (March 13, 2020). "Declaration Of A Local Emergency" (PDF). Madison County, Virginia: Madison County, Virginia Government. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
    (2) Jackson, R. Clay (March 26, 2020). "A Resolution Confirming A Declaration of A Local Emergency: 2020-9" (PDF). Madison County, Virginia: Madison County, Virginia Government. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  51. ^ Alexandria Living Magazine staff (March 14, 2020). "City of Alexandria Declares Local Emergency for Coronavirus". Alexandria Living Magazine. Alexandria, Virginia. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  52. ^ "Stephens City Press Release" (PDF). Town of Stephens City, Virginia, Government. March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020 – via Squarespace. Pursuant to §44–146.21.A of the Code of Virginia, 1950, as amended, and in response to the immediate threat posed to the citizens, visitors, and employees of the Town of Stephens City by the COVID-19 viral pandemic, Stephens City Town Council declares a State of Emergency effective immediately.
  53. ^ (1) Martino, Christopher E. (March 16, 2020). "Local Declaration of Emergency" (PDF). Prince William County, Virginia Government: Office of Executive Management. Retrieved March 28, 2020. Therefore, I, Christopher E. Martino, County Executive and Director of Emergency Management, do hereby declare a state of local emergency in Prince William County, pursuant to Sections 44.146-13, et seq., VA Code Ann.
    (2) Berti, Daniel (March 23, 2020). "Prince William declares local 'state of emergency' amid coronavirus pandemic". Prince William Times. Warrenton, Virginia: Prince William Times. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  54. ^ (1) "Loudoun County Declares Local Emergency in Response to COVID-19". County News. Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County Government. March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020. Loudoun County Administrator Tim Hemstreet issued a declaration of local emergency Monday, March 16, 2020, with the concurrence of Board of Supervisors Chair Phyllis J. Randall. .... The Board of Supervisors is expected to formally ratify the declaration at its next business meeting scheduled for Tuesday, March 17, 2020, at 5:00 p.m.
    (2) Letourneau, Matt. "COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update March 18, 2020". Leesburg, Virginia: Supervisor Matt Letourneau. Retrieved March 28, 2020 – via Constant Contact. ... last evening, the Board of Supervisors formally ratified the County Administrator's State of Local Emergency Declaration.
  55. ^ "Important Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update" (Press release). Warrenton, Virginia: Fauquier County Government. March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020. Today, Fauquier County Administrator Paul McCulla declared a Local Emergency in Fauquier County effective March 17, 2020, at 9:00 am. The Local Emergency was declared due to the threat to public health and safety of the citizens of Fauquier County from exposure to COVID-19. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic constitute an emergency of such sufficient severity to warrant a coordinated response from various County departments, agencies, and volunteer organizations.
  56. ^ "Stafford Declares Local State of Emergency" (Press release). Stafford, Virginia: Stafford County, Virginia Government. March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
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  58. ^ Baroody, Timothy J. (March 17, 2020). "City of Fredericksburg Emergency Order #1 In Response to COVID-19". City of Fredericksburg, Virginia Government. Retrieved March 29, 2020. On March 16, 2020, the City of Fredericksburg, finding that a local emergency exists, issued a Declaration of Local Emergency to invoke emergency authority to protect the health and safety of all persons in the City. .... Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in Fredericksburg City Manager and Director of Emergency Management Timothy J. Baroody pursuant to Fredericksburg City Charter Section 22(G), Virginia Code §44–146.21, Fredericksburg City Code §26–32 et seq., and the Declaration of Local Emergency for the City of Fredericksburg dated March 16, 2020, in coordination with the Virginia Department of Emergency Management pursuant to Virginia Code §44–146.18, in consultation with and with the support of Dr. Denise Bonds, MD, MPH, Acting Director of the Rappahannock District Health Department, and in accordance with the recommendations issued by Mary Washington Healthcare in a letter dated March 16, 2020, it is hereby ordered that: The following emergency regulations and orders shall be effective as of 5:00 p.m. on March 17, 2020, to preserve life and protect health in the City of Fredericksburg. The following emergency regulations have the power of law and shall remain in effect until 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, March 31, 2020, and shall supersede all conflicting laws during the existence of this emergency, with the exception of more restrictive rules or regulations issued by order of the Governor of the Commonwealth. ....
  59. ^ (1) "Town Manager Issues Declaration of Local Emergency" (Press release). Town of Purcellville, Virginia Government. March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
    (2) Mekarski, David A. (March 20, 2020). "Information Pertaining to Declaration of Local Emergency in Response ..." (Press release). Town of Purcellville, Virginia Government. Retrieved March 28, 2020. As Town Manager, on March 16, 2020, I announced a Declaration of Local Emergency under the authority set forth by the Code of Virginia § 44–146.21, with the understanding that the Council shall confirm this declaration within 45 days. The Town Council is scheduled to ratify this Declaration at the Town Council Work Session on Tuesday, March 24, 2020.
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  61. ^ Curry, Jr., Garrey W. (March 17, 2020). "Declaration Of A Local State of Emergency" (PDF). Washington, Virginia: Rappahannock County Government: County Administrator's Office. Retrieved March 29, 2020. ... acting as Director of Emergency Management, I, Garrey W. Curry, Jr., exercise the authority given to me under Code of Virginia § 44–146.21 to declare a local state of emergency that shall remain in effect until rescinded by a subsequent order; ...
  62. ^ "State Of Emergency Declaration COVID-19" (Press release). Spotsylvania, Virginia: Spotsylvania County, Virginia, Government. March 17, 2020. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020. Spotsylvania County declares a local state of emergency in response to growing concerns over the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). County Administrator Edward Petrovitch made the announcement Tuesday evening, March 17, 2020, during a special meeting of the Board of Supervisors.
  63. ^ Powell, Mickey (March 18, 2020). "Coronavirus prompts Clarke County to declare emergency". The Winchester Star. Winchester, Virginia. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020. A local emergency declaration was adopted by the Clarke County Board of Supervisors in a unanimous vote Tuesday afternoon. .... The declaration also enables the county, if it eventually becomes necessary, to "control, restrict, allocate or regulate the use, sale, production or distribution of food, fuel, clothing and other commodities, materials, goods, services and resource systems which fall only within the boundaries" of Clarke County and do not affect nearby localities.
  64. ^ (1) "Culpeper County declares local state of emergency". Culpeper Star-Exponent. Culpeper, Virginia. March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
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  65. ^ Mabe, Walter J. (March 17, 2020). "Declaration of Local Emergency by the Local Director of Emergency Management and Consent of the Board of Supervisors of Warren County" (PDF). Front Royal, Virginia: Warren County, Virginia Government. Retrieved March 29, 2020. THEREFORE, the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, Walter J. Mabe, is the Local Director of Emergency Management (the "Local Director") and declares that a local emergency exists in Warren County pursuant to Code of Virginia § 44–146.21. THEREFORE, the Warren County Board of Supervisors consents to the Local Director's declaration of local emergency pursuant to Code of Virginia § 44–146.21.
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