CP System

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CP System
Cps1 board.gif
A CP System board
ManufacturerCapcom
Release dateMay 13, 1988 (1988-05-13)
DiscontinuedMay 11, 1995 (1995-05-11)
CPUMotorola 68000 (@ 10 MHz)
DisplayRaster, 384 × 224 pixels (horizontal), 4096 colors
Input8-way joystick, from 3 to 6 buttons

The CP System (CPシステム, shīpī shisutemu, CPS for short) is an arcade system board developed by Capcom that ran game software stored on removable daughterboards. More than two dozen arcade titles were released for CPS-1, before Capcom shifted game development over to its successor, the CP System II.

Among the 33 titles released for the original CP System included Street Fighter II: The World Warrior and its first two follow-ups, Street Fighter II: Champion Edition and Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting.

History[edit]

CP System's 10 MHz 68000 CPU and graphics IC

After a number of arcade game boards designed to run only one game, Capcom embarked upon a project to produce a system board that could be used to run multiple games, in order to reduce hardware costs and make the system more appealing to arcade operators.

Capcom began developing the CPS hardware around 1986, when Capcom president Kenzo Tsujimoto came up with the concept inspired by the success of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). He saw the rise of home video games as competition for the arcades, so said the "only way we can make money is to give people twice what they can get at home."[1]

Capcom developed the CPS hardware for about two-and-a-half years, during which time they developed two custom microchips that they called the CPS Super Chips, equivalent to the power of ten normal arcade printed circuit boards (PCBs) at the time.[2][3] The two chips cost £5,500,000 or $9,800,000 (equivalent to $21,000,000 in 2020) to develop.[2]

The system was plagued by many bootleg versions of its games. In particular, there were so many bootleg versions of Street Fighter II that they were more common in some countries than the official version. This problem was virtually eliminated by Capcom in the later CP System II.

The CP System hardware was also utilized in Capcom's unsuccessful attempt at home console market penetration, the CPS Changer, a domestic version of the CP System similar to the Neo-Geo AES.

Technical specifications[edit]

  • CPU:
  • Co-processors: 2x CPS Super Chip[2][3][4]
  • Sound chips:
    • Yamaha YM2151 @ 3.579 MHz
    • Oki OKI6295 @ 1 MHz (7.576 kHz samples)
  • Display
    • Resolution: Raster, 384x224 @ 59.6294 Hz
    • Color depth: 16-bit (12-bit RGB with 4-bit brightness value)
    • Colors available: 65,536[5]
    • Onscreen colors: 4096[5] (192 global palettes with 16 colors each)
  • Sprites:
    • Simultaneously displayable: 256 (per scanlines)
    • Sizes: 16x16, max. 16 colors (15 unique + 1 transparent)
    • Vertical and horizontal flipping capability
  • Tiles: Sizes 8x8, 16x16, 32x32 with 16 colors (15 unique + 1 transparent)
  • Tile maps: 3 maps, 512x512, 1024x1024, 2048x2048 pixel
  • 68K RAM: 64 KB WORK RAM + 192 KB VRAM (Shadow)
  • PPU: 192 KB VRAM + 16 KB CACHE RAM
  • Z80 RAM: 2 KB WORK RAM

List of games[edit]

English title Release date Developer Japanese title Genre Arcade System
Forgotten Worlds 1988-05-13 Capcom Lost Worlds
(ロストワールド)
Shoot 'em up CP System
Ghouls'n Ghosts 1988-12 Capcom Daimakaimura
(大魔界村)
Platformer CP System
Strider 1989-03 Capcom Strider Hiryū
(ストライダー飛竜)
Platformer CP System
Dynasty Wars 1989-04 Capcom Tenchi o Kurau
(天地を喰らう)
Beat 'em up CP System
Willow 1989-06 Capcom Willow
(ウィロー)
Platformer CP System
U.N. Squadron 1989-08 Capcom Area 88
(エリア88)
Shoot 'em up CP System
Final Fight 1989-12-01 Capcom Final Fight
(ファイナルファイト)
Beat 'em up CP System
Pang 1989-12-31 Capcom/Mitchell Corporation Pang
(パン, Pan), also known as Pomping World (Japanese: ポンピング・ワールド, Hepburn: Ponpingu Wārudo)
Action Capcom Mitchell Hardware
1941: Counter Attack 1990-02 Capcom 1941
(1941)
Shoot 'em up CP System
Mercs 1990-03-02 Capcom Senjō no Ōkami II
(戦場の狼II)
Run-and-gun shooter CP System
Mega Twins 1990-06-19 Capcom Chiki Chiki Boys
(チキチキボーイズ)
Platformer CP System
Magic Sword - Heroic Fantasy 1990-06-23 Capcom Magic Sword
(マジックソード)
Platformer CP System
Super Pang 1990-09-19 Capcom/Mitchell Corporation Super Pang
(スーパーパン)
Super Buster Bros. (North America Also known as Super Buster Bros.)
Shooter Capcom Mitchell Hardware
Carrier Air Wing 1990-10-09 Capcom U.S. Navy
(U.S.NAVY)
Shoot 'em up CP System
Nemo 1990-11-20 Capcom Nemo
(ニモ)
Platformer CP System
Street Fighter II: The World Warrior 1991-02-06 Capcom Street Fighter II: The World Warrior
(ストリートファイターII -The World Warrior-)
Head-to-head fighting CP System
Three Wonders 1991-05-20 Capcom Wonder 3
(ワンダー3)
Multi-game CP System
The King of Dragons 1991-07-11 Capcom The King of Dragons
(ザ・キングオブドラゴンズ)
Beat 'em up CP System
Block Block 1991-09-10 Capcom Block Block
(ブロックブロック)
Puzzle Capcom Mitchell Hardware
Captain Commando 1991-09-28 Capcom Captain Commando
(キャプテンコマンドー)
Beat 'em up CP System
Knights of the Round 1991-11-27 Capcom Knights of the Round
(ナイツオブザラウンド)
Beat 'em up CP System
Street Fighter II: Champion Edition 1992-03-13 Capcom Street Fighter II′ (Dash): Champion Edition
(ストリートファイターIIダッシュ -Champion Edition-)
Head-to-head fighting CP System
Adventure Quiz: Capcom World 2 1992-06-11 Capcom Adventure Quiz Capcom World 2
(アドベンチャークイズカプコンワールド2)
Quiz game CP System
Varth: Operation Thunderstorm 1992-06-12 Capcom Varth: Operation Thunderstorm
(バース -オペレーションサンダーストーム-)
Shoot 'em up CP System
Quiz & Dragons: Capcom Quiz Game 1992-07-01 Capcom Quiz & Dragons
(クイズ&ドラゴンズ)
Quiz game CP System
Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting 1992-12-09 Capcom Street Fighter II′ (Dash) Turbo: Hyper Fighting
(ストリートファイターIIダッシュターボ -Hyper Fighting-)
Head-to-head fighting CP System
Ken Sei Mogura: Street Fighter II 1994-04-18 Capcom/Togo/Sigma Ken Sei Mogura
(拳聖土竜)
Whack a mole CP System
Pnickies[6] 1994-06-08 Capcom/Compile Pnickies
(ぷにっきいず)
Puzzle CP System
Quiz Tonosama no Yabō 2: Zenkoku-ban 1995-01-23 Capcom Quiz Tonosama no Yabō 2: Zenkoku-ban
(クイズ 殿様の野望2 全国版)
Quiz game CP System
Pang! 3 1995-05-11 Capcom/Mitchell Corporation Platformer CP System

CP System Dash[edit]

CP System Dash
CPS 1.5 board.gif
A CPS-1.5 board
ManufacturerCapcom
Release dateFebruary 1, 1992 (1992-02-01)
DiscontinuedDecember 6, 1993 (1993-12-06)
CPUMotorola 68000 (@ 10 MHz)
DisplayRaster, 384 × 224 pixels (horizontal), 3072 colors
Input8-way joystick, from 3 to 6 buttons

A year before releasing the CP System II, Capcom released an enhanced version of the original CP System dubbed the CP System Dash, which had some features that would later be used in the CP System II, such as the QSound chips.

The CP System Dash boards have four interlocking PCBs and are contained in gray plastic boxes. To combat piracy, "suicide batteries" were implemented, which power the volatile RAM which contained the manual configuration of the display hardware registers, as well as the priorities registers. The CPS-1 Dash 68000 code is not encrypted at all. If the batteries' voltage should drop below +2V, the registers manually defined in factory by Capcom in RAM would be lost, and the PPU would no longer have access to the hardware specific register set on the game used, rendering the game inoperable, and necessitating the operator sending the board to Capcom to be fixed, at their own expense. Unlike the CP System II, CP System Dash sound ROMs were encrypted using "Kabuki" Z80s.

List of games[edit]

English title Release date Developer Japanese title Genre
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs 1992-02-01 Capcom Cadillacs Kyōryū Shinseiki
(キャディラックス 恐竜新世紀)
Beat 'em up
Warriors of Fate
Sangokushi II (Asia)
1992-10-02 Capcom Tenchi o Kurau II: Sekiheki no Tatakai
(天地を喰らう2・赤壁の戦い)
Beat 'em up
The Punisher 1993-04-22 Capcom The Punisher
(パニッシャー)
Beat 'em up
Saturday Night Slam Masters 1993-07-13 Capcom Muscle Bomber: The Body Explosion
(マッスルボマー -The Body Explosion-)
Sports game
Muscle Bomber Duo: Ultimate Team Battle 1993-12-06 Capcom Muscle Bomber Duo: Heat Up Warriors
(マッスルボマーDUO -Heat Up Warriors-)
Sports game

Capcom Power System Changer[edit]

A home version of the CP System, the Capcom Power System Changer or CPS Changer was released in late 1994 in Japan to compete against SNK's Neo Geo.[7] Capcom released the CPS Changer as an attempt to sell their arcade games in a home-friendly format. The CPS Changer adapter was basically an encased SuperGun (Television JAMMA adapter), and was compatible with most JAMMA standard PCBs. Capcom's "protection" against people using the CPS Changer on other arcade boards was the physical shape of the device. On a normal JAMMA PCB it would not attach firmly and tended to lean at odd angles, but it would work. The CPS Changer has outputs for composite video, S-video and line-level mono audio.

Upon launch in November 1994, Capcom initially manufactured only 1,000 units in Japan.[8]

The CPS Changer featured Super Famicom controller ports, allowing the use of all Super NES controllers, including their six-button joystick, the "CPS Fighter".

All of the CPS Changer games used the CPS arcade hardware. The CPS Changer games were simply arcade PCBs in a special plastic shell suitable for home use. This concept was later re-used in the CP System II hardware. Some CPS1 games were changed slightly for home release, sometimes including debugging features or other easter eggs.[citation needed]

The CPS Changer was sold as a package deal of the console itself, one CPS Fighter joystick controller, and the Street Fighter II ′ (Dash) Turbo game for 39,800 yen. Additional games were sold for about 20,000 yen.

The final game for the CPS Changer was a back-ported version of Street Fighter Zero. Originally released on the CP System II hardware, this special CPS Changer version, released at a premium 35,000 yen, was degraded slightly for the older hardware: it had fewer frames of animation for the game characters, fewer onscreen colors[citation needed], and the sound and music effects were sampled at a lower rate.

List of games[edit]

Release date Developer English title Japanese title Genre
1994 Capcom Warriors of Fate
Sangokushi II (Asia)
Tenchi o Kurau II: Sekiheki no Tatakai
(天地を喰らう2・赤壁の戦い)
Beat 'em up
1994 Capcom Capcom World 2: Adventure Quiz Adventure Quiz Capcom World 2
(アドベンチャークイズカプコンワールド2)
Quiz game
1995 Capcom Captain Commando Captain Commando
(キャプテンコマンドー)
Beat 'em up
1994 Capcom Final Fight Final Fight
(ファイナルファイト)
Beat 'em up
1995 Capcom Knights of the Round Knights of the Round
(ナイツオブザラウンド)
Beat 'em up
1995 Capcom Muscle Bomber Duo: Ultimate Team Battle Muscle Bomber Duo: Heat Up Warriors
(マッスルボマーDUO -Heat Up Warriors-)
Sports game
1994 Capcom Saturday Night Slam Masters Muscle Bomber: The Body Explosion
(マッスルボマー -The Body Explosion-)
Sports game
1994 Capcom Street Fighter II′: Champion Edition Street Fighter II Dash: Champion Edition
(ストリートファイターIIダッシュ -Champion Edition-)
Versus Fighting
1994, pack-in Capcom Street Fighter II′ Turbo: Hyper Fighting Street Fighter II Dash Turbo: Hyper Fighting
(ストリートファイターIIダッシュターボ -Hyper Fighting-)
Versus Fighting
1995 Capcom Street Fighter Alpha Street Fighter Zero
(ストリートファイターZERO)
Versus Fighting
1995 Capcom The King of Dragons The King of Dragons
(ザ・キングオブドラゴンズ)
Beat 'em up

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cover Story: "This Is the Good Time" – Capcom's CPS system brings success to the firm... and offers direction for a troubled video market". RePlay. Vol. 15 no. 7. RePlay Publishing. April 1990. pp. 183–5.
  2. ^ a b c "Capcom: A Captive Audience". The Games Machine. No. 19 (June 1989). 18 May 1989. pp. 24–5.
  3. ^ a b "A Real Winner: operators are the real winners with Capcom's Buster Bros and Final Fight". RePlay. Vol. 15 no. 4. January 1990. pp. 32, 34.
  4. ^ "Magic Sword". RePlay. Vol. 16 no. 1. October 1990. p. 19.
  5. ^ a b "CP System arcade system by Capcom Co., Ltd. (1988)".
  6. ^ "Pnickies". Killer List of Videogames. 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  7. ^ "Capcom's Home Arcade System". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Ziff Davis (67): 50. February 1995.
  8. ^ Akagi, Masumi, ed. (15 February 1995). "Capcom Ships "CP Changer"" (PDF). Game Machine. No. 489. Amusement Press, Inc. p. 22.

External links[edit]