CSL Behring

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CSL Behring LLC
Headquarters King of Prussia, Pennsylvania
Key people
Paul Perreault, CEO and Managing Director of CSL Limited
Number of employees
14,000+[1]
Website http://www.cslbehring.com/

CSL Behring is a biopharmaceutical company, manufacturing plasma-derived and recombinant therapeutic products. Its line of therapies includes products for the treatment of bleeding disorders such as hemophilia and von Willebrand Disease; primary immune deficiencies (PIDD); hereditary angioedema; inherited respiratory disease; and neurological disorders in certain markets. The company's products are also used in cardiac surgery, organ transplantation, burn treatment and to prevent hemolytic diseases in the newborn.[2]

CSL Behring operates the plasma collection network, CSL Plasma.[3]

Company Statistics[edit]

Parent Company: CSL Limited, (ASX:CSL), Melbourne, Australia
Headquarters: King of Prussia, PA
Employees: 14,000+[4]
Operations: In 30 countries
CEO and Managing Director: Paul Perreault[5]
R&D: Marburg, Germany; Bern, Switzerland; King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, USA; Tokyo, Japan; Broadmeadows and Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

History[edit]

CSL Behring is a member of the CSL Group of companies. Parent company CSL Limited (ASX: CSL) is a specialty biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Parkville, Australia. As part of a global alignment, the CSL Behring brand was established in 2007. Previously known as ZLB Behring, the company's history dates back to 1904.[6]

CSL Behring traces its heritage back to Emil von Behring, the inventor of serum therapy or serology.

Year Event[7]
1901 Emil von Behring received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.[8]
1904 Emil von Behring founded the Behringwerke in Marburg, Germany, for the purpose of experimental work on disease prevention and for the manufacture of sera and vaccines.
1913 Behringwerke expands to produce a gas gangrene antiserum and a cholera vaccine.
1916 CSL (then Commonwealth Serum Laboratories) was established in Australia with the goal of providing vaccines to the people of Australia and New Zealand.
1917 CSL produced 3 million doses of a mixed bacterial vaccine to combat the 1919 influenza pandemic.
1930 CSL released its antivenom for tiger snake bites.
1940 Armour Pharmaceuticals (a predecessor company) in Kankakee, Illinois, became a supplier of human albumin (the most abundant protein in human blood plasma) in World War II.
1944 CSL began producing penicillin for the military and Australia to supply the drug to civilians at no charge.
1949 ZLB (Zentrallaboratorium Blutspendedienst, a predecessor company) is established in Bern, Switzerland, as a department of the Swiss Red Cross and holds its first donor blood sessions in Switzerland.
1954 Australian CSL officer Val Bazeley assists Jonas Salk with the production of the experimental polio vaccine used in the first clinical trials in the US. Bazeley returns to Australia to set up production of the Salk vaccine at CSL.
1966 Rh(D) immunoglobulin, produced from plasma, is introduced by CSL for haemolytic disease in newborns.
1981 Behringwerke introduces Haemate human plasma coagulation factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex for the treatment of patients with hemophilia A.
1991 CSL Limited is incorporated in Australia.
2000 ZLB Bioplasma (a predecessor company) is established, acquiring the plasma fractionation assets from SRK, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Swiss Red Cross.
2001 Aventis Behring (a predecessor company) acquires 42 plasma centers.
2004 CSL Limited completes the acquisition of Aventis Behring, combining it with ZLB Bioplasma to create ZLB Behring (later CSL Behring).
2007 ZLB Behring becomes CSL Behring.
2009 ZLB Plasma changes its name to CSL Plasma to align with its parent company, CSL Behring, and opens the plasma testing laboratories in Knoxville, Tennessee.
2009 National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) recognized CSL Behring for developing and marketing a treatment in the U.S. for acute bleeding episodes in patients with congenital fibrinogen deficiency, an extremely rare, potentially life-threatening bleeding disorder.
2009 CSL Behring awarded the Swiss government's Tell Award for innovations in manufacturing and protein therapies.
2012 European Organisation for Rare Disorders recognized CSL Behring for its work developing and manufacturing therapies used to treat rare and serious medical conditions with the 2012 EURORDIS Award.

Products[edit]

CSL Behring researches, develops, manufactures and markets a range of plasma-derived and recombinant products and related services, specializing in the treatment of rare and serious diseases. Its line of therapies includes products for the treatment of bleeding disorders such as hemophilia and von Willebrand Disease; primary immune deficiencies; hereditary angioedema; inherited respiratory disease; and neurological disorders in certain markets. The company's products are also used in cardiac surgery, organ transplantation, burn treatment and to prevent hemolytic diseases in the newborn.[1]

Immunology:

Coagulation/Bleeding Disorders:

Pulmonary:

  • Zemaira, freeze-dried Human Alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (A1-PI)

Critical Care:

  • AlbuRx, Alburex, Human Albumin Behring, Albuminar, human albumin solution (5%, 20% or 25% human albumin solutions)
  • Berinert P, freeze-dried human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate
  • Beriplex P/N, Kcentra, freeze-dried human prothrombin complex concentrate
  • Haemocomplettan P, RiaSTAP, freeze-dried human fibrinogen (factor I) concentrate
  • Kybernin P, freeze-dried human antithrombin III concentrate
  • Streptase, freeze-dried streptokinase

Wound Healing:

(Note: Product availability varies from country to country, depending on registration status.)

[9]

Offices[edit]

The company is headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.[10] It has 14,000+ employees in 30 countries.[11] Major manufacturing centers are located in Bern, Switzerland, Marburg, Germany, Kankakee, Illinois, and Broadmeadows, Australia.[12]

External links[edit]

References[edit]