CXCL11

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Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11
Protein CXCL11 PDB 1rjt.png
PDB rendering based on 1rjt.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols CXCL11 ; H174; I-TAC; IP-9; IP9; SCYB11; SCYB9B; b-R1
External IDs OMIM604852 MGI1860203 HomoloGene3944 GeneCards: CXCL11 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE CXCL11 210163 at tn.png
PBB GE CXCL11 211122 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 6373 56066
Ensembl ENSG00000169248 n/a
UniProt O14625 Q9JHH5
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001302123 NM_019494.1
RefSeq (protein) NP_001289052 NP_062367.1
Location (UCSC) Chr 4:
76.03 – 76.04 Mb
n/a
PubMed search [1] [2]

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11 (CXCL11)[1] is a small cytokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family that is also called Interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) and Interferon-gamma-inducible protein 9 (IP-9). It is highly expressed in peripheral blood leukocytes, pancreas and liver, with moderate levels in thymus, spleen and lung and low expression levels were in small intestine, placenta and prostate.[2] Gene expression of CXCL11 is strongly induced by IFN-γ and IFN-β, and weakly induced by IFN-α.[3] This chemokine elicits its effects on its target cells by interacting with the cell surface chemokine receptor CXCR3, with a higher affinity than do the other ligands for this receptor, CXCL9 and CXCL10.[2][4] CXCL11 is chemotactic for activated T cells. Its gene is located on human chromosome 4 along with many other members of the CXC chemokine family.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Entrez Gene: CXCL11 chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11". 
  2. ^ a b Cole KE, Strick CA, Paradis TJ, Ogborne KT, Loetscher M, Gladue RP, Lin W, Boyd JG, Moser B, Wood DE, Sahagan BG, Neote K (1998). "Interferon–inducible T Cell Alpha Chemoattractant (I-TAC): A Novel Non-ELR CXC Chemokine with Potent Activity on Activated T Cells through Selective High Affinity Binding to CXCR3". J. Exp. Med. 187 (12): 2009–21. doi:10.1084/jem.187.12.2009. PMC 2212354. PMID 9625760. 
  3. ^ Rani MR, Foster GR, Leung S, Leaman D, Stark GR, Ransohoff RM (1996). "Characterization of beta-R1, a gene that is selectively induced by interferon beta (IFN-beta) compared with IFN-alpha". J. Biol. Chem. 271 (37): 22878–84. doi:10.1074/jbc.271.37.22878. PMID 8798467. 
  4. ^ Tensen CP, Flier J, Van Der Raaij-Helmer EM, Sampat-Sardjoepersad S, Van Der Schors RC, Leurs R, Scheper RJ, Boorsma DM, Willemze R (1999). "Human IP-9: A keratinocyte-derived high affinity CXC-chemokine ligand for the IP-10/Mig receptor (CXCR3)". J. Invest. Dermatol. 112 (5): 716–22. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.1999.00581.x. PMID 10233762. 
  5. ^ Erdel M, Laich A, Utermann G, Werner ER, Werner-Felmayer G (1998). "The human gene encoding SCYB9B, a putative novel CXC chemokine, maps to human chromosome 4q21 like the closely related genes for MIG (SCYB9) and INP10 (SCYB10)". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 81 (3–4): 271–2. doi:10.1159/000015043. PMID 9730616. 
  6. ^ O'Donovan N, Galvin M, Morgan JG (1999). "Physical mapping of the CXC chemokine locus on human chromosome 4". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 84 (1–2): 39–42. doi:10.1159/000015209. PMID 10343098. 

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Rani MR, Foster GR, Leung S et al. (1996). "Characterization of beta-R1, a gene that is selectively induced by interferon beta (IFN-beta) compared with IFN-alpha". J. Biol. Chem. 271 (37): 22878–84. doi:10.1074/jbc.271.37.22878. PMID 8798467. 
  • Jacobs KA, Collins-Racie LA, Colbert M et al. (1997). "A genetic selection for isolating cDNAs encoding secreted proteins". Gene 198 (1–2): 289–96. doi:10.1016/S0378-1119(97)00330-2. PMID 9370294. 
  • Cole KE, Strick CA, Paradis TJ et al. (1998). "Interferon–inducible T Cell Alpha Chemoattractant (I-TAC): A Novel Non-ELR CXC Chemokine with Potent Activity on Activated T Cells through Selective High Affinity Binding to CXCR3". J. Exp. Med. 187 (12): 2009–21. doi:10.1084/jem.187.12.2009. PMC 2212354. PMID 9625760. 
  • Erdel M, Laich A, Utermann G et al. (1998). "The human gene encoding SCYB9B, a putative novel CXC chemokine, maps to human chromosome 4q21 like the closely related genes for MIG (SCYB9) and INP10 (SCYB10)". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 81 (3–4): 271–2. doi:10.1159/000015043. PMID 9730616. 
  • Luo Y, Kim R, Gabuzda D et al. (1999). "The CXC-chemokine, H174: expression in the central nervous system". J. Neurovirol. 4 (6): 575–85. doi:10.3109/13550289809114224. PMID 10065899. 
  • Tensen CP, Flier J, Van Der Raaij-Helmer EM et al. (1999). "Human IP-9: A keratinocyte-derived high affinity CXC-chemokine ligand for the IP-10/Mig receptor (CXCR3)". J. Invest. Dermatol. 112 (5): 716–22. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.1999.00581.x. PMID 10233762. 
  • Laich A, Meyer M, Werner ER, Werner-Felmayer G (1999). "Structure and expression of the human small cytokine B subfamily member 11 (SCYB11/formerly SCYB9B, alias I-TAC) gene cloned from IFN-gamma-treated human monocytes (THP-1)". J. Interferon Cytokine Res. 19 (5): 505–13. doi:10.1089/107999099313956. PMID 10386863. 
  • Tensen CP, Flier J, Rampersad SS et al. (1999). "Genomic organization, sequence and transcriptional regulation of the human CXCL 11(1) gene". Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1446 (1–2): 167–72. doi:10.1016/s0167-4781(99)00084-6. PMID 10395932. 
  • Loetscher P, Pellegrino A, Gong JH et al. (2001). "The ligands of CXC chemokine receptor 3, I-TAC, Mig, and IP10, are natural antagonists for CCR3". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (5): 2986–91. doi:10.1074/jbc.M005652200. PMID 11110785. 
  • Lambeir AM, Proost P, Durinx C et al. (2001). "Kinetic investigation of chemokine truncation by CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase IV reveals a striking selectivity within the chemokine family". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (32): 29839–45. doi:10.1074/jbc.M103106200. PMID 11390394. 
  • Hensbergen PJ, van der Raaij-Helmer EM, Dijkman R et al. (2001). "Processing of natural and recombinant CXCR3-targeting chemokines and implications for biological activity". Eur. J. Biochem. 268 (18): 4992–9. doi:10.1046/j.0014-2956.2001.02433.x. PMID 11559369. 
  • Mohan K, Ding Z, Hanly J, Issekutz TB (2002). "IFN-gamma-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant is a potent stimulator of normal human blood T lymphocyte transendothelial migration: differential regulation by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha". J. Immunol. 168 (12): 6420–8. doi:10.4049/jimmunol.168.12.6420. PMID 12055261. 
  • Basu S, Schaefer TM, Ghosh M et al. (2003). "Molecular cloning and sequencing of 25 different rhesus macaque chemokine cDNAs reveals evolutionary conservation among C, CC, CXC, AND CX3C families of chemokines". Cytokine 18 (3): 140–8. doi:10.1006/cyto.2002.0875. PMID 12126650. 
  • Salmaggi A, Gelati M, Dufour A et al. (2003). "Expression and modulation of IFN-gamma-inducible chemokines (IP-10, Mig, and I-TAC) in human brain endothelium and astrocytes: possible relevance for the immune invasion of the central nervous system and the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis". J. Interferon Cytokine Res. 22 (6): 631–40. doi:10.1089/10799900260100114. PMID 12162873. 
  • Rani MR, Hibbert L, Sizemore N et al. (2002). "Requirement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt for interferon-beta-mediated induction of the beta-R1 (SCYB11) gene". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (41): 38456–61. doi:10.1074/jbc.M203204200. PMID 12169689. 
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMC 139241. PMID 12477932. 
  • Kao J, Kobashigawa J, Fishbein MC et al. (2003). "Elevated serum levels of the CXCR3 chemokine ITAC are associated with the development of transplant coronary artery disease". Circulation 107 (15): 1958–61. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.0000069270.16498.75. PMID 12695288. 
  • Satish L, Yager D, Wells A (2003). "Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokine interferon gamma inducible protein-9 as a mediator of epidermal-dermal communication during wound repair". J. Invest. Dermatol. 120 (6): 1110–7. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12230.x. PMID 12787142. 
  • Klunker S, Trautmann A, Akdis M et al. (2003). "A second step of chemotaxis after transendothelial migration: keratinocytes undergoing apoptosis release IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10, monokine induced by IFN-gamma, and IFN-gamma-inducible alpha-chemoattractant for T cell chemotaxis toward epidermis in atopic dermatitis". J. Immunol. 171 (2): 1078–84. doi:10.4049/jimmunol.171.2.1078. PMID 12847282. 
  • Xanthou G, Duchesnes CE, Williams TJ, Pease JE (2003). "CCR3 functional responses are regulated by both CXCR3 and its ligands CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11". Eur. J. Immunol. 33 (8): 2241–50. doi:10.1002/eji.200323787. PMID 12884299.