CYP2C18

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CYP2C18
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
Aliases CYP2C18, CPCI, CYP2C, CYP2C17, P450-6B/29C, P450IIC17, cytochrome P450 family 2 subfamily C member 18
External IDs MGI: 1919332 HomoloGene: 133567 GeneCards: CYP2C18
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE CYP2C18 208126 s at tn.png

PBB GE CYP2C18 215103 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_001128925
NM_000772

NM_028089

RefSeq (protein)

NP_000763
NP_001122397

NP_082365.1

Location (UCSC) Chr 10: 94.68 – 94.74 Mb Chr 19: 39.01 – 39.04 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]
Wikidata
View/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse

Cytochrome P450 2C18 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CYP2C18 gene.[3][4][5]

Function[edit]

This gene encodes a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes. The cytochrome P450 proteins are monooxygenases which catalyze many reactions involved in drug metabolism and synthesis of cholesterol, steroids and other lipids. This protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum but its specific substrate has not yet been determined. The gene is located within a cluster of cytochrome P450 genes on chromosome 10q24. An additional gene, CYP2C17, was once thought to exist; however, CYP4217 is now considered an artefact based on a chimera of CYP2C18 and CYP2C19.[5]

CYP2C18 also possesses epoxygenase activitiy: it can attack various long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids at their double (i.e. alkene) bonds to form epoxide products that act as signaling agents. It metabolizes: 1) arachidonic acid to various epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (also termed EETs); 2) linoleic acid to 9,10-epoxy octadecaenoic acids (also termed vernolic acid, linoleic acid 9:10-oxide, or leukotoxin) and 12,13-epoxy-octadecaenoic (also termed coronaric acid, linoleic acid 12,13-oxide, or isoleukotoxin); 3) docosohexaenoic acid to various epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (also termed EDPs); and 4) eicosapentaenoic acid to various epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (also termed EEQs).[6][7][8]

While CYP2C19, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2J2, and possibly CYP2S1 are the main producers of EETs and, very likely EEQs, EDPs, and the epoxides of linoleic acid, CYP2C18 may contribute to the production of these metabolites in certain tissues.[7][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". 
  2. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". 
  3. ^ Furuya H, Meyer UA, Gelboin HV, Gonzalez FJ (September 1991). "Polymerase chain reaction-directed identification, cloning, and quantification of human CYP2C18 mRNA". Molecular Pharmacology. 40 (3): 375–82. PMID 1896026. 
  4. ^ Romkes M, Faletto MB, Blaisdell JA, Raucy JL, Goldstein JA (April 1991). "Cloning and expression of complementary DNAs for multiple members of the human cytochrome P450IIC subfamily". Biochemistry. 30 (13): 3247–55. doi:10.1021/bi00227a012. PMID 2009263. 
  5. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: CYP2C18 cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, polypeptide 18". 
  6. ^ Fleming I (October 2014). "The pharmacology of the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase/soluble epoxide hydrolase axis in the vasculature and cardiovascular disease". Pharmacological Reviews. 66 (4): 1106–40. doi:10.1124/pr.113.007781. PMID 25244930. 
  7. ^ a b Wagner K, Vito S, Inceoglu B, Hammock BD (October 2014). "The role of long chain fatty acids and their epoxide metabolites in nociceptive signaling". Prostaglandins & Other Lipid Mediators. 113-115: 2–12. doi:10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2014.09.001. PMC 4254344Freely accessible. PMID 25240260. 
  8. ^ Fischer R, Konkel A, Mehling H, Blossey K, Gapelyuk A, Wessel N, von Schacky C, Dechend R, Muller DN, Rothe M, Luft FC, Weylandt K, Schunck WH (March 2014). "Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate the eicosanoid profile in man primarily via the CYP-epoxygenase pathway". Journal of Lipid Research. 55 (6): 1150–1164. doi:10.1194/jlr.M047357. PMC 4031946Freely accessible. PMID 24634501. 
  9. ^ Spector AA, Kim HY (April 2015). "Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism". Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 1851 (4): 356–65. doi:10.1016/j.bbalip.2014.07.020. PMC 4314516Freely accessible. PMID 25093613. 

Further reading[edit]