Cheez-It Bowl

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Cheez-It Bowl
Cheez-It Bowl logo.svg
StadiumChase Field
LocationPhoenix, Arizona
Previous stadiumsArizona Stadium (1989–1999)
Bank One Ballpark (2000–2005)
Sun Devil Stadium (2006–2015)
Previous locationsTucson, Arizona (1989–1999)
Phoenix, Arizona (2000–2005)
Tempe, Arizona (2006–2015)
Operated1989–present
Conference tie-insBig 12, Pac-12
Previous conference tie-insWAC (1990–1997)
Big 12 (1998–2001)
Big East (1998–2005)
Pac-10 (2002–2005)
Big 12 (2006–2013)
Big Ten (2006–2013)
PayoutUS$1,037,000 per team (as of 2018)[1]
Sponsors
Domino's Pizza (1990–1991)
Weiser Lock (1992–1995)
Insight Enterprises (1997–2011)
Buffalo Wild Wings (2012–2013)
TicketCity (2015)
Motel 6 (2016, 2 games)
Kellogg's (2018–present)
Former names
Copper Bowl (1989)
Domino's Pizza Copper Bowl (1990–1991)
Weiser Lock Copper Bowl (1992–1995)
Copper Bowl (1996)
Insight.com Bowl (1997–2001)
Insight Bowl (2002–2011)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl (2012–2013)
TicketCity Cactus Bowl (2015)
Motel 6 Cactus Bowl (2016, 2 games)
Cactus Bowl (2017)
2018 matchup
California vs. TCU (TCU 10–7 OT)
2019 matchup
Air Force vs. Washington State (December 27, 2019)

The Cheez-It Bowl is an NCAA FBS college football bowl game that has been played in the state of Arizona since 1989.

Originally played as the Copper Bowl from inception through 1996, it was known as the Insight.com Bowl from 1997 through 2001, then the Insight Bowl from 2002 through 2011, the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl for 2012 and 2013, and the Cactus Bowl from 2014 through 2017. (The games after the 2014 and 2015 seasons were played on January 2 instead of in late December.) In 2018 the game was renamed again, and sponsored by Cheez-It crackers.[2]

When the bowl was initially founded, it was played at Arizona Stadium in Tucson, on the campus of the University of Arizona. In 2000, the organizers moved the game from Tucson to Phoenix. There, it was played at what is now known as Chase Field, the home of the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball. For the 2006 season, the bowl moved a second time. After the annual Fiesta Bowl left Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe in favor of playing in University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, the Cheez-It Bowl (then still known as the Insight Bowl) was relocated there as a permanent replacement.

The Cheez-It Bowl is temporarily being played at its previous home of Chase Field in Phoenix while Sun Devil Stadium undergoes renovations.[3] The renovations are being undertaken during the offseason, requiring Arizona State to close the stadium at the conclusion of football season through 2017. During this time, the game is one of two bowl games played in baseball-specific stadiums: the other being the Pinstripe Bowl, played at Yankee Stadium.

It was announced on July 3, 2019, that the Cheez-It Bowl would have conference tie-ins with the Big Ten and Big 12 Conferences, starting with the 2020 season. This arrangement will continue through the 2025-26 football season.

History[edit]

"Cactus Bowl" had been the originally planned name for what became the Copper Bowl in 1989.[4] The game was played under the Copper Bowl name through 1996, after which title sponsorship rights were assumed by Insight Enterprises, who self-titled the game from 1997 through 2011. In 2012, restaurant chain Buffalo Wild Wings became the sponsor and self-titled the game for two years.[5] Buffalo Wild Wings declined to renew sponsorship following the 2013 game,[6] at which time organizers opted to rename the game "Cactus Bowl" rather than reverting to the Copper Bowl name. There had been a Texas-based Cactus Bowl played in Division II, but that game was discontinued after 2011. For 2014, TicketCity sponsored the new Cactus Bowl,[7] and Motel 6 became the sponsor in 2015.[8] In 2018, Kellogg's became the sponsor and rebranded the bowl, naming it after its popular cheese cracker, Cheez-It.[2]

For the first ten years, the game was played at Arizona Stadium, on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. In 2000, the bowl's organizers moved the game to Bank One Ballpark, a baseball-specific stadium, in downtown Phoenix. In 2006, the game moved to Sun Devil Stadium at Arizona State University in Tempe to replace the Fiesta Bowl, which had moved to University of Phoenix Stadium in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale. The 2006 game set a record (since tied in the 2016 Alamo Bowl) for the biggest comeback in NCAA Division I FBS bowl history,[9] as Texas Tech came back from a 38–7 third-quarter deficit to defeat Minnesota 44–41 in overtime.

Before 2006, the game mainly featured teams from the Pac-10, WAC, Big 12, and old Big East conferences. From 2006-2013, it began featuring an annual matchup between teams from the Big Ten and the Big 12. Starting with the 2015 game, it has featured a matchup between Pac-12 and Big 12 teams, contingent on bowl eligibility. Teams from the ACC and MW have also competed, along with teams from the now defunct SWC and Big Eight, and one independent school (Notre Dame in 2004).

For the first three playings of the Copper Bowl, TBS carried the game. Beginning in 1992 and continuing until the 2005 playing, the game aired on ESPN. After a four-year hiatus, during which NFL Network carried the game, ESPN regained the rights beginning in 2010.

Game results[edit]

No. Date Bowl name Winning Team Losing Team Attnd.
1 December 31, 1989 Copper Bowl Arizona 17 NC State 10 37,237
2 December 31, 1990 Copper Bowl California 17 Wyoming 15 36,340
3 December 31, 1991 Copper Bowl Indiana 24 Baylor 0 35,751
4 December 31, 1992 Copper Bowl Washington State 31 Utah 28 40,826
5 December 29, 1993 Copper Bowl Kansas State 52 Wyoming 17 49,075
6 December 29, 1994 Copper Bowl BYU 31 Oklahoma 6 45,122
7 December 27, 1995 Copper Bowl Texas Tech 55 Air Force 41 41,004
8 December 27, 1996 Copper Bowl Wisconsin 38 Utah 10 42,122
9 December 27, 1997 Insight.com Bowl Arizona 20 New Mexico 14 49,385
10 December 26, 1998 Insight.com Bowl Missouri 34 West Virginia 31 36,147
11 December 31, 1999 Insight.com Bowl Colorado 62 Boston College 28 35,762
12 December 28, 2000 Insight.com Bowl Iowa State 37 Pittsburgh 29 41,813
13 December 29, 2001 Insight.com Bowl Syracuse 26 Kansas State 3 40,028
14 December 26, 2002 Insight Bowl Pittsburgh 38 Oregon State 13 40,533
15 December 26, 2003 Insight Bowl California 52 Virginia Tech 49 42,364
16 December 28, 2004 Insight Bowl Oregon State 38 Notre Dame 21 45,917
17 December 27, 2005 Insight Bowl Arizona State 45 Rutgers 40 43,536
18 December 29, 2006 Insight Bowl Texas Tech 44 Minnesota 41 (OT) 48,391
19 December 31, 2007 Insight Bowl Oklahoma State 49 Indiana 33 48,892
20 December 31, 2008 Insight Bowl Kansas 42 Minnesota 21 49,103
21 December 31, 2009 Insight Bowl Iowa State 14 Minnesota 13 45,090
22 December 28, 2010 Insight Bowl Iowa 27 Missouri 24 53,453
23 December 30, 2011 Insight Bowl Oklahoma 31 Iowa 14 54,247
24 December 29, 2012 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan State 17 TCU 16 44,617
25 December 28, 2013 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Kansas State 31 Michigan 14 53,284
26 January 2, 2015 Cactus Bowl Oklahoma State 30 Washington 22 35,409
27 January 2, 2016 Cactus Bowl West Virginia 43 Arizona State 42 39,321
28 December 27, 2016 Cactus Bowl Baylor 31 Boise State 12 33,328
29 December 26, 2017 Cactus Bowl Kansas State 35 UCLA 17 32,859
30 December 26, 2018 Cheez-It Bowl TCU 10 California 7 (OT) 33,121
31 December 27, 2019 Cheez-It Bowl Air Force vs. Washington State

Games  1–11 played in Tucson at Arizona Stadium
Games 12–17 played in Phoenix at Bank One Ballpark (now Chase Field)
Games 18–26 played in Tempe at Sun Devil Stadium
Games 27–present played in Phoenix at Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark)

MVPs[edit]

Two MVPs are selected for each game; one an offensive player, the other a defensive player.[10]

Game Offensive MVP Defensive MVP
Player Team Position Player Team Position
1989 Shane Montgomery North Carolina State QB Scott Geyer Arizona DB
1990 Mike Pawlawski California QB Robert Midgett Wyoming LB
1991 Vaughn Dunbar Indiana TB Mark Hagen Indiana LB
1992 Drew Bledsoe Washington State QB Kareem Leary Utah DB
1993 Andre Coleman Kansas State WR Kenny McEntyre Kansas State CB
1994 Jamal Willis BYU RB Broderick Simpson Oklahoma LB
1995 Zebbie Lethridge Texas Tech QB Mickey Dalton Air Force CB
1996 Ron Dayne Wisconsin RB Tarek Saleh Wisconsin LB
1997 Trung Canidate Arizona RB Jimmy Sprotte Arizona LB
1998 Marc Bulger West Virginia QB Jeff Marriott Missouri DT
1999 Cortlen Johnson Colorado RB Jashon Sykes Colorado LB
2000 Sage Rosenfels Iowa State QB Reggie Hayward Iowa State DE
2001 James Mungro Syracuse RB Clifton Smith Syracuse LB
2002 Brandon Miree Pittsburgh TB Claude Harriott Pittsburgh DL
2003 Aaron Rodgers California QB Ryan Gutierrez California FS
2004 Derek Anderson Oregon State QB Trent Bray Oregon State LB
2005 Rudy Carpenter Arizona State QB Jamar Williams Arizona State LB
2006 Graham Harrell Texas Tech QB Antonio Huffman Texas Tech CB
2007 Zac Robinson Oklahoma State QB Donovan Woods Oklahoma State S
2008 Dezmon Briscoe Kansas WR James Holt Kansas LB
2009 Alexander Robinson Iowa State RB Christopher Lyle Iowa State DE
2010 Marcus Coker Iowa RB Micah Hyde Iowa DB
2011 Blake Bell Oklahoma QB Jamell Fleming Oklahoma DB
2012 Le'Veon Bell Michigan State RB William Gholston Michigan State DE
2013 Tyler Lockett Kansas State WR Dante Barnett Kansas State DB
2015 Desmond Roland Oklahoma State RB Seth Jacobs Oklahoma State LB
2016 (Jan.) Skyler Howard West Virginia QB Shaq Petteway West Virginia LB
2016 (Dec.) KD Cannon Baylor WR Tyrone Hunt Baylor DE
2017 Alex Delton Kansas State QB Denzel Goolsby Kansas State S
2018 Sewo Olonilua TCU RB Jaylinn Hawkins California S

Sportsmanship award[edit]

The bowl awarded a sportsmanship award for the 2001 through January 2016 games.[10]

Game Player Team Position
2001 Terry Pierce Kansas State LB
2002 Derek Anderson Oregon State QB
2003 Doug Easlick Virginia Tech FB
2004 Derek Curry Notre Dame LB
2005 Ryan Neill Rutgers DE
2006 Dominic Jones Minnesota DB
2007 Jonathan "Josh" Sandberg Indiana OG
2008 Jack Simmons Minnesota TE
2009 D.J. Burris Minnesota OG
2010 Tim Barnes Missouri C
2011 Tyler Nielsen Iowa LB
2012 Tayo Fabuluje TCU OT
2013 Devin Funchess Michigan WR
2015 Andrew Hudson Washington DE
2016 (Jan.) D. J. Foster Arizona State RB

Most appearances[edit]

Texas is the only current Big 12 school that has not played in this bowl. Seven of the current Big 12 schools have appeared multiple times. Former Big 12 members Colorado and Missouri have appeared in the bowl, but former Big 12 members Nebraska and Texas A&M have not.

Updated through the December 2018 edition (30 games, 60 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record
1 Kansas State 4 3–1
T2 California 3 2–1
T2 Minnesota 3 0–3
T4 Arizona 2 2–0
T4 Oklahoma State 2 2–0
T4 Texas Tech 2 2–0
T4 Iowa State 2 2–0
T4 Arizona State 2 1–1
T4 Indiana 2 1–1
T4 Missouri 2 1–1
T4 Oregon State 2 1–1
T4 Pittsburgh 2 1–1
T4 Iowa 2 1–1
T4 Oklahoma 2 1–1
T4 West Virginia 2 1–1
T4 Baylor 2 1–1
T4 TCU 2 1–1
T4 Washington State 2 1–0
T4 Air Force 2 0-1
T4 Utah 2 0–2
T4 Wyoming 2 0–2
Teams with a single appearance

Won: BYU, Colorado, Kansas, Michigan State, Syracuse, Wisconsin
Lost: Boise State, Boston College, Michigan, New Mexico, North Carolina State, Notre Dame, Rutgers, UCLA, Virginia Tech, Washington

Appearances by conference[edit]

Updated through the December 2018 edition (30 games, 60 total appearances).

Rank Conference Appearances Wins Losses Win pct.
1 Big 12 17 14 3 .824
2 Pac-12 12 7 5 .583
3 Big Ten 10 4 6 .400
T4 Big East 7 2 5 .286
T4 WAC 7 1 6 .143
T6 Big Eight 2 1 1 .500
T6 SWC 2 1 1 .500
T8 ACC 1 0 1 .000
T8 Mountain West 1 0 1 .000
T8 Independents 1 0 1 .000

Notes:

Pac-12 record includes appearances when the conference was the Pac-10. From 1989 through 2005, Pac-10 teams made eight appearances and were 7–1.
Current Pac-12 member Colorado appeared in the game as a member of the Big 12 in 1999.
Notre Dame appeared as an Independent in 2004.

Game records[edit]

Team Performance vs. opponent Year
Most points scored 62, Colorado vs. Boston College 1999
Most points scored (losing team) 49, Virginia Tech vs. California 2003
Most points scored (both teams) 101, California vs. Virginia Tech 2003
Most points scored in a half
Most points scored in a half (both teams)
Fewest points allowed 0, Indiana vs. Baylor 1991
Largest margin of victory 35, Kansas State vs. Wyoming 1993
First downs
Rushing yards
Passing yards
Total yards
Fewest rushing yards
Fewest passing yards
Fewest total yards
Individual Performance vs. opponent Year
Total offense
Touchdowns
Rushing yards
Rushing TDs
Passing yards
Passing TDs
Receptions
Receiving yards
Receiving TDs
Tackles
Sacks
Interceptions
Long Plays Performance vs. opponent Year
Touchdown run
Touchdown pass
Kickoff return
Punt return
Interception return
Fumble return
Punt
Field goal

Note: When there is a tie, the most recent one will be listed.


Media coverage[edit]

The bowl has been televised by three different networks; TBS (1989–1991), ESPN (1992–2005, 2010–present), and NFL Network (2006–2009).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2018 Bowl Schedule". CFP.com. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "CHEEZ-IT JOINS CACTUS BOWL AS NEW NAMING RIGHTS PARTNER". Retrieved August 20, 2018.
  3. ^ McMurphy, Brett (May 4, 2015). "Cactus Bowl moving to Chase Field for next three seasons". ESPN.com.
  4. ^ "New bowl game seeking sponsor, TV pact". The Tuscaloosa News. 1988-08-13. Retrieved 2014-12-30.
  5. ^ "Insight Bowl loses its title sponsor after 15 years,". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. 26 January 2012. Retrieved 26 January 2012.
  6. ^ "Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl loses sponsorship". azcentral. 16 June 2014.
  7. ^ "TicketCity gets Cactus Bowl naming rights for Cactus Bowl in Tempe". Phoenix Business Journal. 2014-11-25. Retrieved 2014-12-30.
  8. ^ "Motel 6 inks naming rights deal for Cactus Bowl". Phoenix Business Journal. Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  9. ^ "Down 31, Texas Tech rallies for biggest bowl comeback". Associated Press. December 29, 2006. Archived from the original on 2 January 2007. Retrieved 30 December 2006 – via ESPN.
  10. ^ a b "Game History". fiestabowl.org. Retrieved January 17, 2018.

External links[edit]