Cailliet Method

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Cailliet Method is a method of learning the saxophone originally devised by French-born American composer Lucien Cailliet, which he described in the two published volumes named "Cailliet Method for Saxophone".[1][2] The method itself focuses on the inclusion of Music Theory in order to accentuate the role of harmonies, counterpoints and orchestration, to evoke appreciation from the musician on their importance within music, without departing too much from the sake of instrumental training.[3]

The emphasis within the Cailliet method is based upon the belief that "one should know a subject completely before specializing in any part of it".[4] The method itself encompasses traditional methods such as scales and arpeggios with various additional articulations for the purpose of increasing proficiency, but also involves the study of various other forms of musical notation and concept.[5] Amongst these additional studies is the diminished seventh, which Cailliet described as vague, unexplained and even mysterious to trained musicians.[6]

The other focuses, as described by the second volume of the method are:

  • Scales and arpeggios (with several alternate articulations)[7]
    • Major and minor scales, proceeding in thirds[7]
    • Arpeggios on dominant 7th chords[7]
    • Arpeggios on diminished sevenths[7]
  • Intervals [8]
    • Chromatic intervals [8]
    • Articulation and intervals [8]
  • Expression [8]
    • Melodic expression [8]
    • Rhythmic expression [8]
    • Harmonic expression [8]
  • "Artifices of composition" [9]
    • Canonic imitation [9]
    • Fugue and Canon [9]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book One)
  2. ^ Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two)
  3. ^ Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) - p1 "It unfortunately occurs that students of instrumental music [,] in their eagerness in attaining "performing ability", neglect the study of music theory. ... I have tried as in the Book I, to explain as much theory as the size of the book permits, without however departing from the purpose of instrumental training.
  4. ^ Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book One) p1 - (Direct quote)
  5. ^ Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) p1 - "I have preceded the various exercises by brief explanations pertaining to their respective character"
  6. ^ Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) p1 - "For example, the mention of "dominant seventh", "diminished seventh", "augmented fifth chords", "whole-tone scale" or artifices of composition ... is sometimes, even to well[-]trained players, something vague, mysterious, unexplained or taken for granted."
  7. ^ a b c d Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) p2 - 14
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) p20 - 30
  9. ^ a b c Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) p30 - 35

References[edit]

  1. Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book One) Rockville Centre, L.I., New York: Belwin Publications
  2. Cailliet, Lucien (Date Not Known). Cailliet Method for saxophone (Book Two) Rockville Centre, L.I., New York: Belwin Publications