Caillou Museum

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Caillou Museum.

The Caillou Museum is housed in the building where Napoleon Bonaparte spent the night and early morning before the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

It is located 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south of the Lion of Waterloo, at Chaussée de Bruxelles (Brussels high-road) 66, 1472 Genappe. Travelling north from Genappe the high-road passes pass over the Waterloo battlefield through Waterloo and on to Brussels.

History[edit]

The burnt out shell of the house sketched by Robert Hills (1816).

In 1815 the farmhouse belonged to Séance de Caioux.[1][a] Napoleon resided there on the night of the 17/18 of June 1815,[1] and it is where Napoleon held his breakfast conference at which he told his marshals "Wellington is a bad general, the English are bad troops, and this affair is nothing more than eating breakfast".[2]

A day after the battle, the Prussians, vowing that it should never again harbour their former enemy, burnt the farmhouse.[1]

Museum[edit]

The house in 2011 photographed from a similar position to the sketch in 1816. The Lion Mound is visible on the horizon to left of the building.

The museum houses unique pieces, such as the Emperor's camp bed and table he used during the campaign.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Hills notes "The French official details say, that the Emperor's" head quarters were at the farm of Oaillon, near Planchenoit. Caioux was its name, as written for me by a farmer near the spot" (Hills 1816, p. 93).
  1. ^ a b c Hills 1816, p. 93.
  2. ^ Longford 1971, p. 547.
  3. ^ Point 2015.

References[edit]

  • Longford, Elizabeth (1971), Wellington the Years of the Sword, London: Panther, ISBN 0-586-03548-6
  • Point, B.W. (Summer 2015), journal d'information officiel de la Province du Brabant wallon (15)
  • Hills, Robert (1816), Sketches in Flanders and Holland: With Some Account of a Tour Through Parts of Those Countries, Shortly After the Battle of Waterloo; in a Series of Letters to a Friend, J. Haines and J. Turner, p. 93

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 50°38′45.96″N 4°25′14.77″E / 50.6461000°N 4.4207694°E / 50.6461000; 4.4207694