Calgary-Glenmore

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Calgary-Glenmore
Flag of Alberta.svg Alberta electoral district
CalgaryGlenmore in Calgary.jpg
2010 boundaries
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Alberta
MLA
 
 
 
Linda Johnson
Progressive Conservative
District created 1957
First contested 1959
Last contested 2012

Calgary-Glenmore formally styled Calgary Glenmore from 1957 to 1971 is a provincial electoral district in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The district is mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta.

The electoral riding of Calgary Glenmore is one of two original Calgary riding's of the seven that still survives from the 1959 redistribution of the Calgary riding. This riding covers the mid south west portion of Calgary and contains the neighborhoods of Bayview, Braeside, Cedarbrae, Chinook Park, Eagle Ridge, Glenmore Park, Haysboro, Kelvin Grove, Kingsland, Lake View, North Glenmore Park, Palliser, Pump Hill, Oakridge and Southwood. The riding was named after the Glenmore Reservoir which sits in the middle of the riding.

History[edit]

The Alberta government decided to return to using the first past the post system of voting from Single Transferable Vote for the 1959 general election. The province redistributed the Calgary and Edmonton super riding's and standardized the voting system across the province.

Calgary-Glenmore was one of the six electoral districts created that year. The others were Calgary Bowness, Calgary Centre, Calgary West, Calgary North, Calgary North East, Calgary South East.[1]

The 2010 boundary redistribution saw Calgary-Glenmore lose the neighborhood of Southwood south of Southland Drive. It gained the neighborhoods of Chinook Park, Kelvin Grove, Kingsland, North Glenmore Park and Lakeview up to Glenmore Trail.

Boundary history[edit]

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Calgary-Glenmore[12]
Assembly Years Member Party
See Calgary electoral district from 1921-1959
14th 1959–1963 Ernest Watkins Progressive Conservative
15th 1963–1967 Bill Dickie Liberal
16th 1967–1969
1969–1971 Progressive Conservative
17th 1971–1975
18th 1975–1979 Hugh Planche
19th 1979–1982
20th 1982–1986
21st 1986–1989 Dianne Mirosh
22nd 1989–1993
23rd 1993–1997
24th 1997–2001 Ron Stevens
25th 2001–2004
26th 2004–2008
27th 2008–2009
2009 Vacant
2009–2010 Paul Hinman Wildrose Alliance
2010-2012 Wildrose
28th 2012–present Linda Johnson Progressive Conservative

Electoral history[edit]

When Calgary Glenmore was created in 1959 it covered most of Southwest Calgary that existed at the time. Voters of the of district returned Progressive Conservative candidate Ernest Watkins who was the last representative elected in the old Calgary electoral district in a 1957 by-election. He became the only candidate from his party returned to the Legislature that year and one of four opposition candidates elected as most of the province had chosen Social Credit candidates that year.

Watkins became leader of the Progressive Conservatives shortly after his election. He held the leadership until 1962 when he stepped down. He decided not to run for re-election and retired from the Legislature.

The riding continued its trend of electing opposition candidates by returning Liberal candidate Bill Dickie. Dickie who had served as a Calgary Alderman was just one of two Liberals elected in the 1963 general election. He was re-elected in 1967 and crossed the floor to the Progressive Conservatives on November 23, 1969. He would be the last serving member under the Liberal banner until 1986.

The voters of Glenmore re-elected Dickie as a Progressive Conservative in the 1971 election as that party won its first term in Government under Peter Lougheed. Dickie served as the first member of cabinet for the district with the portfolio of Minister of Mines and Minerals. He retired in 1975 and was replaced by Hugh Planche who won some of the biggest majorities in his three terms representing Calgary-Glenmore. Planche served in cabinet as Minister of Economic Development from 1979 until his retirement in 1986.

The fourth member of the district Dianne Mirosh served in cabinet as Minister of Innovation and Science and later as Minister of Transportation during her time in office from 1986 to 1997. She had some tough electoral battles with Liberal candidate Brendan Dunphy as he almost managed to defeat Mirosh twice.

Ron Stevens became the districts MLA in 1997 serving until 2009. He served a number of cabinet portfolios. His first portfolio was Minister of Gaming starting in 2001. He then moved on to be the Minister of International and Intergovernmental Relations, then Attorney General and finally Deputy Premier. Stevens vacated his seat on May 15, 2009.

On September 14, 2009 the district would provide its first surprise result since the 1960s by electing Wildrose Alliance candidate Paul Hinman in a hotly contested race. Hinman was leader of his party at the time and previously served as the representative for Cardston-Taber-Warner before being defeated in 2008.

In the Alberta general election, 2012 Hinman lost his seat to Linda Johnson.

Legislature results[edit]

1959 general election[edit]

1959 Alberta general election results[13] Turnout 54.64% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Ernest Watkins 4,893 42.59% *
     Social Credit Ross Lawson 4,681 40.74% *
     Liberal Reg Clarkson 1,916 16.67% *
Total 11,490 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 46
21,113 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative pickup new district Swing N/A

1963 general election[edit]

1963 Alberta general election results[14] Turnout 53.67% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Bill Dickie 6,037 44.49% 27.82% *
     Social Credit Ross Lawson 4,268 31.45% -9.29%
     Progressive Conservative Ned Corrigal 2,891 21.30% -21.29% *
     NDP G.A.J. Otjes 374 2.76% *
Total 13,570 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 22
25,327 Eligible Electors
     Liberal pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing 24.56%

1967 general election[edit]

1967 Alberta general election results[15] Turnout 69.19% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Bill Dickie 5,743 41.20% -3.29%
     Social Credit Len Pearson 3,840 27.55% -3.90% *
     Progressive Conservative Ron Helmer 3,406 24.44% 3.14% *
     NDP Max Wolfe 950 6.81% 4.05% *
Total 13,939 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 60
20,234 Eligible Electors
     Liberal hold Swing -3.21%

1971 general election[edit]

1971 Alberta general election results[16] Turnout 77.01% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Bill Dickie 7,658 56.37% 31.93% 15.17%
     Social Credit Ray Kingsmith 5,122 37.70% 10.15% *
     NDP George McGuire 806 5.93% -0.88% *
Total 13,586 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 178
17,873 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold from floor crossing Swing 21.04%

1975 general election[edit]

1975 Alberta general election results[17] Turnout 64.29% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Hugh Planche 10,641 65.92% 9.55% *
     Liberal Nicholas Taylor 4,166 25.81% *
     Social Credit Ralph Cameron 838 5.19% -32.51% *
     NDP Bill Peterson 498 3.08% -2.84% *
Total 16,143 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 16
25,133 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 17.68%

1979 general election[edit]

1979 Alberta general election results[18] Turnout 58.89% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Hugh Planche 8,212 55.83% -10.09%
     Liberal Nicholas Taylor 4,774 32.46% 6.65%
     Social Credit Ernie Kaszas 1,280 8.70% 3.51% *
     NDP Neil Ellison 442 3.01% -0.07% *
Total 14,708 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 25
25,017 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing -8.37%

1982 general election[edit]

1982 Alberta general election results[19] Turnout 66.56% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Hugh Planche 13,835 77.91% 22.08%
     Western Canada Concept Brian McClung 1,864 10.50% *
     NDP George Yanchula 1,532 8.63% 5.62% *
     Alberta Reform Movement Barry Rust 526 2.96% *
Total 17,757 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 64
26,733 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 16.29%

1986 general election[edit]

1986 Alberta general election results[20] Turnout 46.73% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Dianne Mirosh 5,718 60.37% -17.54% *
     Liberal Lois Cummings 2,033 21.46% *
     NDP Kelly Hegg 1,337 14.12% 5.49% *
     Independent Larry Heather 384 4.05% *
Total 9,472 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 30
20,333 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing -19.50%

1989 general election[edit]

1989 Alberta general election results[21] Turnout 54.70% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Dianne Mirosh 5,189 45.48% -14.89%
     Liberal Brendan Dunphy 4,587 40.20% 18.74% *
     NDP Barry Bristman 1,197 10.49% -3.63% *
     Independent Greg Pearson 437 3.83% *
Total 11,410 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 23
20,902 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing -16.82%

1993 general election[edit]

1993 Alberta general election results[22] Turnout 69.00% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Dianne Mirosh 7,972 48.63% 3.15%
     Liberal Brendan Dunphy 7,064 43.09% 2.89%
     NDP Noreen Murphy 603 3.68% -0.15% *
     Social Credit Stuart van der Lee 545 3.33% *
Greens Sol Candel 147 0.90% *
     Natural Law John Vrskovy 61 0.37% *
Total 16,392 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 33
23,806 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 3.02%

1997 general election[edit]

1997 Alberta general election results[23] Turnout 59.67% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Ron Stevens 8,247 58.14% 9.51% *
     Liberal Wayne Stewart 4,919 34.68% -8.41% *
     Social Credit Vernon Cook 583 4.11% 0.78% *
     NDP Grace Johner 435 3.07% -0.61% *
Total 14,184 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 29
23,818 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 8.96%

2001 general election[edit]

2001 Alberta general election results[24] Turnout 60.69% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Ron Stevens 9,678 67.71% 9.57%
     Liberal Michael Broadhurst 3,708 25.94% -8.74% *
Greens James Kohut 467 3.27% *
     NDP Jennifer Stewart 441 3.08% 0.01% *
Total 14,294 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 55
23,644 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 9.15%

2004 general election[edit]

2004 Alberta general election results[25] Turnout 48.38% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Ron Stevens 6,263 50.47% -17.24%
     Liberal Avalon Roberts 4,364 35.17% 9.23% *
     Alberta Alliance Ernest McCutcheon 571 4.60% *
     NDP Holly Heffernan 553 4.46% 1.38% *
Greens Evan Sklarski 532 4.29% 1.02% *
     Social Credit Larry Heather 127 1.01% *
Total 12,410 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 67
25,788 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing -13.24%

2008 general election[edit]

2008 Alberta general election results[26] Turnout 41.39% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Ron Stevens 6,436 50.67% 0.20%
     Liberal Avalon Roberts 4,213 33.17% -2.00%
     Wildrose Alliance Ryan Sadler 1,025 8.07% 3.47%1 *
Greens Arden Bonokoski 550 4.33% 0.04% *
     NDP Holly Heffernan 477 3.76% -0.70
Total 12,701 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 57
30,828 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 1.10%
  1. Party percent change compared to the Alberta Alliance 2004 results.

2009 by-election[edit]

September 14, 2009 by-election results[27] Turnout 39.15% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Wildrose Alliance Paul Hinman 4,052 36.87% 28.80% *
     Liberal Avalon Roberts 3,774 34.34% 1.17%
     Progressive Conservative Diane Colley-Urquhart 2,847 25.90% -24.77% *
     NDP Eric Carpendale 148 1.34% -2.42% *
     Social Credit Len Skowronski 99 0.90% *
     Independent Antoni Grochowski 71 0.65% *
Total 10,991 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 35
28,164 Eligible Electors
     Wildrose Alliance pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing 14.99%

The 2009 by-election was initiated by the resignation of incumbent Ron Stevens on May 15, 2009.[28] Stevens left office to accept a judicial post five days later on May 20, 2009.[29] Premier Stelmach had six months to call the election, but he didn't wait the full-time period instead calling it for September 14, 2009.[30]

The by-election attracted a few high profile candidates. The only person to announce running for the Progressive Conservative nomination was Calgary Ward 13 Alderman Diane Colley-Urquhart.[29] She was acclaimed as the candidate by the Progressive Conservative party on June 5, 2009.[31]

The nomination for the provincial Liberal party which had previously held the riding and had finished second in every year since 1982 was hotly contested. The first candidate to announce his intention to run for the Alberta Liberal Party nomination was former Ontario NDP MPP George Dadamo. He served in the Bob Rae government from 1990 to 1995. A second candidate for the Liberal party announced on 1 June 2009, Corey Hogan a Liberal party insider. The result of Hogan running caused Dadamo to withdraw.[32] The Liberal nominating convention took place on June 22, 2009 and resulted with 2004 and 2008 Liberal candidate Avalon Roberts winning.

The nominee for the Wildrose Alliance was former Cardston-Taber-Warner MLA and Leader of the party Paul Hinman. Hinman grew up in the community of Haysboro located in the constituency.[33] The Wildrose Alliance nomination convention was held on June 23, 2009 with Hinman receiving the nomination by acclamation.[34]

Candidates rounding out the field were Social Credit leader Len Skowronski who was the first candidate to be nominated and the New Democrats nominated Eric Carpendale. An Independent candidate Antoni Grochowski also filed nomination papers. He had previously ran as a Social Credit candidate in Calgary-Buffalo in 2008

The election was a major test for all the political parties. The Liberals under new leader David Swann having taken the reins of the leadership in 2008 was be facing their first electoral test. The Progressive Conservatives popularity was tested for the first time after winning their massive majority under Premier Ed Stelmach in the 2008 general election. The Wildrose Alliance would test their viability as a party in being able to attract enough votes in an urban riding to elect a candidate.

On election night the results showed a hotly contested race between Hinman and Roberts with Hinman coming out on top by a margin of nearly 300 votes. The result was a bitter disappointment for David Swann and the Liberals and would eventually lead him to resign as leader of the Liberal party. The Progressive Conservatives finished a distant third for the first time in the riding since 1967 and lost control of the seat they had held since 1969. The bottom three candidates barely registered with voters. The NDP result was the worst ever result in a Calgary riding since the party was formed and the Social Credit vote continued to decline falling below a percent.[35]

2012 general election[edit]

2012 Alberta general election Turnout % Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Linda Johnson 8,408 48.95% %
     Wildrose Paul Hinman 6,472 37.68% %
     Liberal Dan MacAulay 1,227 7.14% % *
     NDP Richard Collier 1,071 6.23% % *
Total ' 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined '
Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative pickup from Wildrose Swing %

Senate nominee results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election results: Calgary-Glenmore[36] Turnout 48.38%
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Votes % Ballots Rank
     Progressive Conservative Bert Brown 5,092 18.04% 52.78% 1
     Progressive Conservative Jim Silye 4,371 15.48% 45.31% 5
     Progressive Conservative Betty Unger 3,906 13.84% 40.49% 2
     Independent Link Byfield 2,807 9.94% 29.09% 4
     Progressive Conservative David Usherwood 2,783 9.86% 28.85% 6
     Progressive Conservative Cliff Breitkreuz 2,384 8.45% 24.71% 3
     Independent Tom Sindlinger 2,031 7.20% 21.05% 9
     Alberta Alliance Vance Gough 1,711 6.06% 17.73% 8
     Alberta Alliance Michael Roth 1,643 5.82% 17.03% 7
     Alberta Alliance Gary Horan 1,502 5.31% 15.57% 10
Total Votes 28,230 100%
Total Ballots 9,648 2.93 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 2,829
25,788 Eligible Electors

Voters had the option of selecting 4 Candidates on the Ballot

2012 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

Student Vote results[edit]

2004 election[edit]

Participating Schools[37]
Bishop Grandin High School
Harold Panabaker Jr. High School
Henry Wise Wood Senior High School
John Ware Junior High

On November 19, 2004 a Student Vote was conducted at participating Alberta schools to parallel the 2004 Alberta general election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. The vote was conducted in 80 of the 83 provincial electoral districts with students voting for actual election candidates. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.

2004 Alberta Student Vote results[38]
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
     Progressive Conservative Ron Stevens 306 31.55%
     Liberal Avalon Roberts 240 24.74%
Greens Evan Sklarski 178 18.35%
     NDP Holly Heffernan 174 17.94%
     Alberta Alliance Ernest McCutcheon 46 4.74%
     Social Credit Larry Heather 26 2.68%
Total 970 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 17

2012 election[edit]

2012 Alberta Student Vote results
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
     Progressive Conservative Linda Johnson %
     Wildrose Paul Hinman %
     Liberal Dan MacAulay %
     Alberta Party %
     NDP Richard Collier %
Total ' 100%

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "41". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1957. p. 186. 
  2. ^ "44". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1959. p. 158. 
  3. ^ "43". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1961. p. 225. 
  4. ^ "39". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1962. pp. 127–128. 
  5. ^ "47". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1966. pp. 273–274. 
  6. ^ "34". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1970. p. 196. 
  7. ^ "28". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1977. p. 232. 
  8. ^ "E-4.05". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1983. pp. 52–53. 
  9. ^ "24". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1985. p. 434. 
  10. ^ "E‑4". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 1996. 
  11. ^ "E‑4.1". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 2003. 
  12. ^ "Members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta 1905-2006". Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Retrieved 2009-05-20. 
  13. ^ "Calgary Glenmore results 1959 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Calgary Glenmore results 1963 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Calgary Glenmore results 1967 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1971 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1975 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1979 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1982 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1986 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1989 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  22. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1993 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  23. ^ "1997 General Election". Elections Alberta. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  24. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore statement of official results 2001 Alberta general election". Elections Alberta. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  25. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore Statement of Official Results 2004 Alberta general election". Elections Alberta. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  26. ^ The Report on the March 3, 2008 Provincial General Election of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly. Elections Alberta. pp. 214–217. 
  27. ^ "Report on the September 14, 2009 Calgary-Glenmore By-Election". Elections Alberta. November 20, 2009. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  28. ^ "Ron Stevens resigns from MLA, cabinet post". CBC News. May 15, 2009. [dead link]
  29. ^ a b "Former deputy premier appointed judge; alderman to run for his seat". CBC News. May 20, 2009. [dead link]
  30. ^ "Calgary Glenmore byelection to be held Sept. 14". CBC News. [dead link]
  31. ^ Jason Fekete (June 5, 2009). "Calgary alderman acclaimed Tory MLA candidate". Calgary Herald. 
  32. ^ Jason Markusoff (June 1, 2009). "Hogan in the wrestlemania for Glenmore". Calgary Herald. 
  33. ^ Lindsey Wallis (May 21, 2009). "Race heats up for Calgary-Glenmore". Fast Forward Weekly. 
  34. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore nomination". Wildrose Alliance. Retrieved 2009-05-29. 
  35. ^ . CBC News. September 14, 2009 title=Wildrose Alliance wins Calgary-Glenmore byelection http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/story/2009/09/14/calgary-glenmore-byelection-results-hinman-roberts-urquhart.html title=Wildrose Alliance wins Calgary-Glenmore byelection.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  36. ^ "Senate Nominee Election 2004 Tabulation of Official Results". Elections Alberta. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  37. ^ "School by School results". Student Vote Canada. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  38. ^ "Riding by Riding Results - the Candidates". Student Vote Canada. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 

External links[edit]