California's 39th congressional district

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California's 39th congressional district
California US Congressional District 39 (since 2013).tif
California's 39th congressional district since 2013[1]
U.S. Representative
  Gil Cisneros
DYorba Linda
Median income$89,300[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIEVEN[4]

California's 39th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California. The district includes parts of Los Angeles, Orange and San Bernardino counties, and includes Fullerton, La Habra, La Habra Heights, Brea, Buena Park, Anaheim Hills, Placentia, Yorba Linda, Diamond Bar, Chino Hills, Hacienda Heights and Rowland Heights. It is currently represented by Democrat Gil Cisneros.

In January 2018, Republican incumbent Ed Royce announced his retirement, creating great uncertainty and interest in the 2018 district election, with concerns about multiple Democrats and Republicans running in the district's jungle primary[5][6][7] Assemblywoman Young Kim and Democrat Gil Cisneros won first and second place respectively, advancing to the November 6 general election.[8] After the general election, it took several days to gather and tally absentee ballots, but on November 17, Cisneros was declared the projected winner.[9]

Competitiveness[edit]

In statewide races[edit]

Election results from statewide races
Year Office Results
1990 Governor[10] Wilson 66.2% - 28.2%
1992 President[11] Bush 43.8% - 34.1%
Senator[12] Herschensohn 46.3% - 45.1%
Senator (Special)[13] Seymour 50.3% - 40.6%
1994 Governor[14] Wilson 65.5% - 30.2%
Senator[15] Huffington 57.9% – 33.3%
1996 President[16] Dole 48.3% – 41.4%
1998 Governor[17] Lungren 49.9% – 47.5%
Senator[18] Fong 55.2% – 41.1%
2000 President[19] Bush 52.9% - 43.3%
Senator[20] Campbell 46.8% - 46.2%
2002 Governor[21] Davis 54.1% - 38.0%
2003 Recall[22][23] Yes Yes 54.3% - 45.7%
Schwarzenegger 45.0 - 36.5%
2004 President[24] Kerry 58.5% - 40.3%
Senator[25] Boxer 63.7% - 31.3%
2006 Governor[26] Angelides 49.3% - 46.1%
Senator[27] Feinstein 64.1% - 31.0%
2008 President[28] Obama 65.5% - 32.4%
2010 Governor[29] Brown 60.3% - 33.6%
Senator[30] Boxer 59.8% - 34.2%
2012 President[31] Romney 50.8% - 47.1%
Senator[32] Emken 50.8% - 49.2%
2014 Governor[33] Kashkari 55.5% – 44.5%
2016 President[34] Clinton 51.5% - 42.9%
Senator[35] Harris 54.1% - 45.9%
2018 Governor Cox 50.4% - 49.6%
Senator Feinstein 55.5% - 44.5%

List of members representing the district[edit]

District created January 3, 1973.

Representative Party Dates Electoral history Counties
Andrew J. Hinshaw.jpg Andrew Hinshaw Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1975
Redistricted to the 40th district Inland Orange
CharlesEWiggins.jpg Charles E. Wiggins Republican January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1979
Redistricted from the 25th district

Retired
Northeastern Orange
Dannemeyer Wm.png William E. Dannemeyer Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1993
Retired to run for the US Senate
Edward Royce, official photo portrait color.jpg Ed Royce Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2003
Redistricted to the 40th district Southern Los Angeles, Northwestern Orange
Linda Sánchez official photo.jpg Linda Sánchez Democratic January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2013
Redistricted to the 38th district South/Southeastern Los Angeles
Ed Royce 113th Congress.jpg Ed Royce Republican January 3, 2013 -
January 3, 2019
Redistricted from the 40th district
Retired
Los AngelesOrange County (Chino Hills, Diamond Bar, and Fullerton)
Gil Cisneros official portrait.jpg Gil Cisneros Democratic January 3, 2019. -
Present

Election results[edit]

197219741976197819801982198419861988199019921994199619982000200220042006200820102012201420162018

1972[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1972[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew J. Hinshaw 146,911 65.7
Democratic John Woodland Black 76,695 43.3
Total votes 223,606 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1974[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1974[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles E. Wiggins 87,995 55.2
Democratic William E. "Bill" Farris 64,735 40.4
American Independent Pat P. Scalera 6,967 4.4
Total votes 159,337 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1976[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1976[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles E. Wiggins (Incumbent) 122,657 58.6
Democratic William E. "Bill" Farris 86,745 41.4
Total votes 209,402 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1978[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1978[39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer 112,160 63.7
Democratic William E. Farris 63,891 36.3
Total votes 176,051 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1980[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1980[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer (Incumbent) 175,228 76.3
Democratic Leonard L. Lahtinen 54,504 23.7
Total votes 229,732 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1982[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1982[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer (Incumbent) 129,539 72.2
Democratic Frank G. Verges 46,681 26.0
Libertarian Frank Boeheim 3,152 1.8
Total votes 179,372 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1984[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1984[42]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer (Incumbent) 175,788 76.2
Democratic Robert E. Ward 54,889 23.8
Total votes 230,677 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1986[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1986[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer (Incumbent) 131,603 74.4
Democratic David D. Vest 42,377 24.0
Peace and Freedom Frank Boeheim 2,752 1.6
Total votes 176,732 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1988[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1988[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer (Incumbent) 169,360 74.0
Democratic Don E. Marquis 52,162 22.7
Libertarian Lee Connelly 7,470 3.3
Independent Write-ins 367 0.0
Total votes 229,359 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1990[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1990[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Dannemeyer (Incumbent) 113,849 65.3
Democratic Francis X. "Frank" Hoffman 53,670 30.8
Peace and Freedom Maxine Bell Quirk 6,709 3.9
Total votes 174,228 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1992[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1992[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce 122,472 57.2
Democratic Molly McClanahan 81,728 38.5
Libertarian Jack Dean 9,484 4.3
Total votes 213,684 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1994[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1994[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 113,641 66.4
Democratic R. O. "Bob" Davis 49,696 29.0
Libertarian Jack Dean 7,907 4.6
Total votes 171,244 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1996[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1996[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 120,761 62.9
Democratic Robert Davis 61,392 31.9
Libertarian Jack Dean 10,137 5.2
Total votes 192,290 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

1998[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1998[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 97,366 62.6
Democratic A. "Cecy" R. Groom 52,815 34.0
Libertarian Jack Dean 3,347 2.2
Natural Law Ron Jevning 1,937 1.2
Total votes 155,465 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

2000[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2000[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 129,294 62.8
Democratic Gill G. Kanel 64,938 31.5
Natural Law Ron Jevning 6,597 3.2
Libertarian Keith D. Gann 5,275 2.5
Total votes 206,104 100.0
Turnout  
Republican hold

2002[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2002[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linda Sánchez 52,256 54.9
Republican Tim Escobar 38,925 40.8
Libertarian Richard G. Newhouse 4,165 4.3
Total votes 95,346 100.0
Turnout  
Democratic gain from Republican

2004[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2004[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linda Sánchez (incumbent) 100,132 60.7
Republican Tim Escobar 64,832 39.3
Total votes 164,964 100.0
Turnout  
Democratic hold

2006[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2006[53]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linda Sánchez (incumbent) 72,149 65.9
Republican James L. Andion 37,384 34.1
Total votes 109,533 100.0
Turnout  
Democratic hold

2008[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2008[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linda Sánchez (incumbent) 125,289 69.7
Republican Diane A. Lenning 54,533 30.3
Total votes 179,822 100.0
Turnout  
Democratic hold

2010[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2010[55]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linda Sánchez (incumbent) 81,590 63.3
Republican Larry S. Andre 42,037 32.6
American Independent John A. Smith 5,334 4.1
Total votes 128,961 100.0
Turnout  
Democratic hold

2012[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2012[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 145,607 57.8
Democratic Jay Chen 106,360 42.2
Total votes 251,967 100%
Republican hold

2014[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2014[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 91,319 68.5
Democratic Peter O. Anderson 41,906 31.5
Total votes 133,225 100.0
Republican hold

2016[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2016[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Royce (incumbent) 150,777 57.2
Democratic Brett Murdock 112,679 42.8
Total votes 263,456 100.0
Republican hold

2018[edit]

In January 2018, Republican incumbent Ed Royce announced his retirement.[5] Royce's retirement created great uncertainty and interest in this election, due to the possibility of two candidates of the same political party winning California's jungle primary.[6][7]

The primary election resulted in two candidates of different parties, with Republican Assemblywoman Young Kim and Democrat Gil Cisneros coming in first and second place respectively.[8] After the general election, it took several days to gather and tally absentee ballots, but on November 17, Cisneros was the projected winner of the election.[9]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2018[59]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gil Cisneros 110,794 50.7
Republican Young Kim 107,774 49.3
Total votes 218,568 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

Living former representatives[edit]

As of January 2019, there are three former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from California's 39th congressional district who are alive. The most recent representative to die was Andrew Hinshaw (served 1973–1975) on January 21, 2016. The most recently serving representative to die was Charles E. Wiggins (served 1975-79) on March 2, 2000.

Representative Term in office Date of birth (and age)
William E. Dannemeyer 1979 - 1993 (1934-10-21) October 21, 1934 (age 84)
Ed Royce 1993 - 2003
2013 - 2019
(1951-10-12) October 12, 1951 (age 67)
Linda Sanchez 2003 - 2013 (1969-01-28) January 28, 1969 (age 50)

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003 - 2013

The 39th Congressional District was originally one of five reapportioned to California after the 1970 U.S. Census.

From 1993 to 2003, the 39th Congressional District was a Republican stronghold. In 2003, this territory was mostly redesignated into the neighboring 40th Congressional District and 42nd Congressional District. From 2003 to 2013, the 39th district was represented by Linda Sánchez, who now represents the 38th Congressional District.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ US Census
  2. ^ US Census
  3. ^ LA Times
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Bowman, Bridget (January 8, 2018). "House Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce Announces Retirement". Roll Call. Washington, DC. Retrieved January 8, 2018.
  6. ^ a b Schneider, Elena (3 June 2018). "'This is the weirdest race in the country'". Politico. Retrieved 1 July 2018.
  7. ^ a b Blood, Michael R. (May 5, 2018). "California's Orange County could determine Congress control". Sacramento Bee.
  8. ^ a b Martin, Jonathan; Arango, Tim (June 6, 2018). "Democrats Find Relief in California House Race Results". The New York Times.
  9. ^ a b "Democrat Cisneros nabs GOP House seat in Southern California". AP NEWS. 2018-11-18. Retrieved 2018-11-18.
  10. ^ Statement of Vote (1990 Governor)
  11. ^ Statement of Vote (1992 President)
  12. ^ Statement of Vote (1992 Senate)
  13. ^ Statement of Vote (1992 Senate)
  14. ^ Statement of Vote (1994 Governor)
  15. ^ Statement of Vote (1994 Senate)
  16. ^ Statement of Vote (1996 President)
  17. ^ Statement of Vote (1998 Governor) Archived September 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^ Statement of Vote (1998 Senate) Archived September 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ Statement of Vote (2000 President)
  20. ^ Statement of Vote (2000 Senator)
  21. ^ Statement of Vote (2002 Governor)
  22. ^ Statement of Vote (2003 Recall Question)
  23. ^ Statement of Vote (2003 Governor)
  24. ^ Statement of Vote (2004 President)
  25. ^ Statement of Vote (2004 Senator)
  26. ^ Statement of Vote (2006 Governor)
  27. ^ Statement of Vote (2006 Senator)
  28. ^ Statement of Vote (2008 President)
  29. ^ Statement of Vote (2010 Governor)
  30. ^ Statement of Vote (2010 Senator)
  31. ^ Statement of Vote (2012 President)
  32. ^ Statement of Vote (2012 Senator)
  33. ^ Statement of Vote (2014 Governor)
  34. ^ Statement of Vote (2016 Senator)
  35. ^ Statement of Vote (2016 President)
  36. ^ 1972 election results
  37. ^ 1974 election results
  38. ^ 1976 election results
  39. ^ 1978 election results
  40. ^ 1980 election results
  41. ^ 1982 election results
  42. ^ 1984 election results
  43. ^ 1986 election results
  44. ^ 1988 election results
  45. ^ 1990 election results
  46. ^ 1992 election results
  47. ^ 1994 election results
  48. ^ 1996 election results
  49. ^ 1998 election results
  50. ^ 2000 election results
  51. ^ 2002 election results
  52. ^ 2004 election results
  53. ^ 2006 election results
  54. ^ 2008 election results
  55. ^ 2010 election results
  56. ^ 2012 election results
  57. ^ 2014 election results
  58. ^ 2016 election results
  59. ^ 2018 election results

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°56′25″N 117°50′06″W / 33.94028°N 117.83500°W / 33.94028; -117.83500