California Film Commission

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California Film Commission
Agency overview
Formed 1985
Headquarters 7080 Hollywood Boulevard, Suite 900, Hollywood, California 90028
Agency executives
  • Amy Lemisch, Director
  • Steve Dayan, Chairman
Parent agency Governor's Office of Business and Economic Development - (GO-Biz)
Website http://www.film.ca.gov/

The California Film Commission (CFC) was founded in 1985 by then California Governor George Deukmejian[1] to act in an economic development capacity for the state.[2] It is a part of the California Trade and Commerce Agency,[3] formerly the Business, Transportation, and Housing Agency. Its purpose is to enhance California's position as the location of choice for motion picture, television and commercial production.[4]

The board is made up of 26 members, appointed by the Governor, the Senate Committee on Rules, and the Speaker of the Assembly, as well as ex officio membership.[5] The commission has two programs: Film California First and Star Program. The former, founded in 2000 by then Governor Gray Davis,[6] refunds location costs to filmmakers for certain locations and expenses. The later offers certain state owned properties for free to filmmakers.[7] There are over 50 local film commissions known as FLICS (Film Locations in California, Statewide) associated with CFC that provide local support for filmmakers and facilitate with the permit process.[8]

The current Director of the California Film Commission is Amy Lemisch.[9] Previous directors included Lisa Rawlins,[10] and Karen Constine.[11]

Library[edit]

In 1993, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory signed an agreement to develop an online reference system for the CFC's Location Resource Library. The Electronic Production Resource Library Information Database would be a catalog for the more than 200,000 location photographs that the CFC had at the time.[2] The project, undertaken by Caltech who manages the JPL for NASA, and the California Trade and Commerce Agency, aims to assist with the screening process for potential production locations through the use of new technology.[12]

The library is the world's largest of its kind, housing hundreds of thousands of images of California.[13] The website CinemaScout helps production scouts review locations and plan a shoot.[14] Subject categories include: Towns and Communities; Residential; Commercial and Retail; Public/Government/Municipal; Educational and Religious; Industrial; Parks and Recreation Areas; Ranches, Farms and Agriculture; Transportation; Water and Coastal Area; and Geography/Geology.[15]

Awards[edit]

CFC and FLICS are hosts of the California On Location Awards[4] which include the Location Professional of the Year Award and the Robin Eickman Memorial Mentorship Award.[16]

At the 2009 Locations Trade Show, attended by 180 film commissions and others representing more than 30 countries, the CFC's pavilion received 2nd Prize for "Most Informative Booth".[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hozic, Aida A. (2001). Hollyworld : space, power, and fantasy in the American economy. Cornell University Press. pp. 117–. ISBN 978-0-8014-3926-1. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Doyle, Jim (November 23, 1993). "FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE". jpl.nasa.gov. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  3. ^ Koehler, Gus; Hogan, Costolino. "State Government Economic Development Programs". California Research Bureau, California State Library. November 26, 1996. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  4. ^ a b "The California Film Commission and FLICS Honor Filmmakers for Excellence In Working on Location in the Golden State At The 7th Annual California On Location Awards". thefreelibrary.com. PR Newswire Association LLC. 2001. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "2009 California Government Code - Section 14998-14998.13 :: Chapter 1. California Film Commission". justia.com. 2009. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  6. ^ Mosco, Vincent; Schiller, Dan (2001). Continental order?: integrating North America for cybercapitalism. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 225–. ISBN 978-0-7425-0954-2. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  7. ^ Jolliffe, Genevieve; Jones, Chris (27 April 2004). The guerilla film makers handbook. Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 81–. ISBN 978-0-8264-1464-9. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  8. ^ "State Senator Ron Calderon is a newly installed Commissioner". casen.govoffice.com. 2007. Archived from the original on 21 August 2010. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  9. ^ "Members of the Board". film.ca.gov. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  10. ^ "Pasadena Movie Filming Discussion". Los Angeles Times. October 28, 1990. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  11. ^ "The Scorpion King Receives "Rock" Solid Help From Film California First Program". film.ca.gov. October 30, 2001. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  12. ^ Peltz, James F. (December 7, 1993). "Paths of 3 Giant Defense Firms Varied, Challenging Industry: 'Conversion' means different things to wary workers. How Hughes, Northrop and Litton are coping.". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  13. ^ "California posts record 438 film starts in 1994; state continues as a favorite production". Business Wire. January 20, 1995. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  14. ^ Habbestad, Kristen (May 4, 2007). "Cerritos College Film Production Student Lands Summer Internship with Fox 11 TV's "Good Day L.A."". cerritos.edu. Norwalk, CA: Cerritos College. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  15. ^ Clevé, Bastian (2000). Film production management. Focal Press. pp. 67–. ISBN 978-0-240-80393-7. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  16. ^ "Jim Baldwin Receives Mentorship Award". baldwinproductions.com. November 28, 2001. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  17. ^ Nordstrand, Karen (April 22, 2009). "Monterey County Film Commission Shows Off Locations and New California Film Incentive Program at 2009 Locations Trade Show" (PDF). filmmonterey.org. Monterey County Film Commission. p. 2. Retrieved 14 January 2011.