2016 California Proposition 51

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Proposition 51
K-12 and Community College Facilities
Results
Votes %
Yes 7,516,142 55.18%
No 6,104,294 44.82%
Valid votes 13,620,436 93.22%
Invalid or blank votes 990,073 6.78%
Total votes 14,610,509 100.00%
Registered voters/turnout 19,411,771 75.27%
Results by county
2016CaliforniaProposition51.svg
  Yes     No
Source: California Secretary of State[1]

Proposition 51 is a California ballot proposition that passed on the November 8, 2016 ballot, regarding $9 billion in bonds to fund construction and improvement of K-12 and community college facilities. The measure designates $7 billion for K-12 projects falling under four types of projects (new construction, modernization, career technical education facilities, and charter school facilities), and $2 billion for any facility project for community colleges.[2] No other bond measures related to education have been on the California ballot since 2006.[3]

There was bipartisan support for Prop 51.[3] Arguments for the measure stated that K-12 and community college classrooms and other facilities are in need of improvement and repair to meet health and safety standards.[4] Arguments against the measure stated that it did not guarantee equitable distribution of the bond money.[3] The opposition discontinued their fundraising in June 2016.[3]

A September 2016 poll by the Public Policy Institute of California showed that 47% of likely voters supported Proposition 51, 43% opposed it, and 10% did not know how they would vote.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement of Vote - November 8, 2016, General Election". December 16, 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2017.
  2. ^ "Proposition 51. School Bonds. Funding for K-12 School and Community College Facilities. Initiative Statutory Amendment". Legislative Analyst's Office. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d "California Proposition 51, Public School Facility Bonds (2016)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Official Voter Information Guide" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  5. ^ Baldassare, Mark (September 2016). "Californians & Their Government: Statewide Survey" (PDF). Public Policy Institute of California. Retrieved 11 October 2016.

External links[edit]