California School for the Deaf, Fremont

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 37°33′32.01″N 121°57′55.33″W / 37.5588917°N 121.9653694°W / 37.5588917; -121.9653694

California School for the Deaf
Csdeagle.png
Address
39350 Gallaudet Drive
Fremont, California
United States
Information
Type Public
Established 1860 (1860)
Superintendent Dr. Scott Kerby (acting)
Faculty 80
Grades E-12
Number of students 900
Color(s) Orange and Black
Mascot Eagles
Website

The California School for the Deaf is a school for deaf children in Fremont, California. The school educates deaf children from all over Northern California. Its campus in Fremont is adjacent to the campus of the California School for the Blind.

Its companion school in Southern California is CSD-Riverside.

History[edit]

Founded in San Francisco in 1860, the school moved to Berkeley in 1869. The new site, constructed in 1869 at 2601 Warring St., Berkeley, CA, adjacent to the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, served as the school for the deaf until the late 1970s,[1] when the University of California successfully petitioned for it to be condemned as seismically unsafe, forcing the school to move.[2] A Daily Cal article on November 29, 1979 uncovered proof that the University administration had "coveted the Deaf and Blind School land for 57 years." Half of the school land went to UC Berkeley, while the other half went to the city. After the location was taken over by the university, it was renamed Clark Kerr campus, in honor of the first chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, and has served as an additional dormitory unit for its students.

Current location[edit]

The State Department of Education purchased land for the new school for the Deaf at its current location in Fremont, CA, in an area found to be at least as seismically unstable as the school's original site. The California School for the Deaf, Fremont opened in the Fall of 1980.

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gannon, Jack. 1981. Deaf Heritage–A Narrative History of Deaf America, Silver Spring, MD: National Association of the Deaf, pp. 35-36 (PDF; PDF)
  2. ^ Norton, Kenneth W. 2000. The Eagle Soars to Enlightenment. Fremont, CA: California School for the Deaf, pp. 133-157 (Worldcat)

External links[edit]