2014 California gubernatorial election

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California gubernatorial election, 2014

← 2010 November 4, 2014 2018 →
Turnout30.94%[1]
  Edmund G Brown Jr (cropped).jpg Neel Kashkari official Fed photo 2015 (cropped).jpg
Nominee Jerry Brown Neel Kashkari
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 4,388,368 2,929,213
Percentage 60.0% 40.0%

California Governor Election Results by County, 2014.svg
County results

Brown:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

Kashkari:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

Governor before election

Jerry Brown
Democratic

Elected Governor

Jerry Brown
Democratic

Republican candidate Kashkari campaigns at the San Diego LGBT Pride Parade.

The 2014 California gubernatorial election was held on November 4, 2014, to elect the Governor of California, concurrently with elections for the rest of California's executive branch, as well as elections to the United States Senate in other states and elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections.

Incumbent Democratic Governor Jerry Brown ran for re-election to a second consecutive and fourth overall term in office. Although governors are limited to lifetime service of two terms in office, Brown previously served as governor from 1975 to 1983, and the law only affects terms served after 1990.[2][3][4]

A primary election was held on June 3, 2014. Under California's nonpartisan blanket primary law, all candidates appear on the same ballot, regardless of party. In the primary, voters may vote for any candidate, regardless of their party affiliation. The top two finishers — regardless of party — advance to the general election in November, even if a candidate manages to receive a majority of the votes cast in the primary election. Washington is the only other state with this system, a so-called "top two primary" (Louisiana has a similar "jungle primary"). Brown and Republican Neel Kashkari finished first and second, respectively, and contested in the general election,[5] which Brown won. He won the largest gubernatorial victory since 1986, "despite running a virtually nonexistent campaign."[6]

Primary election[edit]

A certified list of candidates was released by the Secretary of State on March 27, 2014. The primary election took place on Tuesday, June 3, 2014, from 7am to 8pm.[7]

Party candidacies[edit]

Democratic Party[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrew[edit]
  • Geby Espinosa, gym owner
  • Hanala Sagal, author and fitness personality
  • Michael Strimling, attorney
Declined[edit]

Republican Party[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrew[edit]
Declined[edit]

Libertarian Party[edit]

Declined[edit]

Green Party[edit]

Declared[edit]

American Independent Party[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

Peace and Freedom Party[edit]

Declared[edit]

Independent[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Bogdan Ambrozewicz, small business owner, Independent candidate for the State Senate in 2012 and Republican candidate for the State Assembly in 2011[30]
  • Janel Buycks, minister/business owner[15][31]
  • Rakesh Kumar Christian, small business owner, independent candidate for governor in 2010[8]
  • Joe Leicht, golf course operator[15]
  • Robert Newman, psychologist, farmer and Republican candidate for governor in 2003, 2006 and 2010[15]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jerry
Brown (D)
Andrew
Blount (R)
Tim
Donnelly (R)
Neel
Kashkari (R)
Abel
Maldonado (R)
Other Undecided
GQR May 21–28, 2014 626 ± 4.4% 50% 13% 18% 5% 14%
SurveyUSA May 16–19, 2014 610 ± 4% 57% 18% 11% 4% 10%
PPIC May 8–15, 2014 901 ± 4.9% 48% 15% 10% 1% 27%
PPIC April 8–15, 2014 944 ± 5.1% 46% 3% 9% 2% 2% 38%
Field Poll March 18–April 5, 2014 504 ± 4.5% 57% 3% 17% 2% 1% 20%
PPIC March 11–18, 2014 936 ± 4.7% 47% 2% 10% 2% 3% 36%
Field Poll November 15–December 3, 2013 836 ± 3.5% 52% 9% 3% 11% 25%
PPIC November 12–19, 2013 1,081 ± 4.5% 46% 16% 7% 1% 29%

Results[edit]

Results by county:
  Donnelly >= 30%
  Brown >= 30%
  Brown >= 40%
  Brown >= 50%
  Brown >= 60%
  Brown >= 70%
  Brown >= 80%
California gubernatorial primary election, 2014[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Brown (Incumbent) 2,354,769 54.34
Republican Neel Kashkari 839,767 19.38
Republican Tim Donnelly 643,236 14.85
Republican Andrew Blount 89,749 2.07
Republican Glenn Champ 76,066 1.76
Green Luis J. Rodriguez 66,872 1.54
Peace and Freedom Cindy Sheehan 52,707 1.22
Republican Alma Marie Winston 46,042 1.06
No party preference Robert Newman 44,120 1.02
Democratic Akinyemi Agbede 37,024 0.85
Republican Richard William Aguirre 35,125 0.81
No party preference "Bo" Bogdan Ambrozewicz 14,929 0.35
No party preference Janel Hyeshia Buycks 12,136 0.28
No party preference Rakesh Kumar Christian 11,142 0.26
No party preference Joe Leicht 9,307 0.22
Write-in Karen Jill Bernal 17 <0.01
Write-in Nickolas Wildstar 17 <0.01
Write-in Jimelle L. Walls 3 <0.01
Total votes 4,333,028 100
Turnout   14.67

General election[edit]

Debates[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[33] Solid D November 3, 2014
Sabato's Crystal Ball[34] Safe D November 3, 2014
Rothenberg Political Report[35] Safe D November 3, 2014
Real Clear Politics[36] Safe D November 3, 2014

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jerry
Brown (D)
Neel
Kashkari (R)
Other Undecided
Zogby Analytics October 28–31, 2014 705 ± 3.8% 51% 33% 16%
GQR/American Viewpoint October 22–29, 2014 1,162 ± 3.3% 56% 37% 7%
Field Poll October 15–28, 2014 941 ± 3.4% 54% 33% 13%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov October 16–23, 2014 7,463 ± 2% 55% 37% 1% 8%
PPIC October 12–19, 2014 1,704 ± 3.5% 52% 36% 12%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov September 20–October 1, 2014 7,943 ± 2% 56% 36% 1% 7%
PPIC September 8–15, 2014 916 ± 4.9% 54% 33% 2% 11%
LA Times/USC[permanent dead link] September 2–9, 2014 1,089 ± 3.3% 57% 36% 7%
GQR/AV September 2–8, 2014 8,941 ± 2% 57% 32% 11%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov August 18–September 2, 2014 8,941 ± 2% 53% 35% 2% 10%
Field Poll August 14–28, 2014 467 ± 4.8% 50% 34% 16%
Gravis Marketing July 22–24, 2014 580 ± 4% 52% 35% 13%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov July 5–24, 2014 9,393 ± ? 57% 33% 3% 7%
PPIC July 8–15, 2014 984 ± 4.7% 52% 33% 4% 11%
Field Poll June 5–22, 2014 2,013 ± 3.2% 52% 32% 0% 16%
Rasmussen Reports June 4–5, 2014 823 ± 4% 52% 33% 5% 10%
GQR May 21–28, 2014 626 ± 4.4% 53% 35% 2% 9%
MFour/Tulchin Research[permanent dead link] August 27–30, 2013 1,001 ± 3.5% 44% 15.4% 8.1% 32.5%

Results[edit]

Brown won easily, by nearly twenty points. He outperformed his majority margin from 2010. Brown as expected did very well in Los Angeles and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Kashkari conceded defeat right after the polls closed in California.

California gubernatorial general election, 2014[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Brown (Incumbent) 4,388,368 59.97%
Republican Neel Kashkari 2,929,213 40.03%
Total votes 7,317,581 100.00%

Results by County[edit]

[38]

County Brown % Kashkari %
Alameda 293,081 82.2 63,593 17.8
Alpine 284 61.9 175 38.1
Amador 5,682 44.6 7,071 55.4
Butte 29,520 47.8 32,249 52.2
Calaveras 6,870 43.7 8,841 56.3
Colusa 1,789 42.7 2,398 57.3
Contra Costa 174,403 68.6 79,660 31.4
Del Norte 3,488 49.6 3,539 50.4
El Dorado 27,916 45.5 33,443 54.5
Fresno 76,143 47.6 83,744 52.4
Glenn 2,049 34.4 3,908 65.6
Humboldt 24,003 64.6 13,146 35.4
Imperial 13,457 64.3 7,484 35.7
Inyo 2,317 42.7 3,112 57.3
Kern 54,269 40.9 78,417 59.1
Kings 8,752 39.2 13,575 60.8
Lake 10,722 61.3 6,775 38.7
Lassen 2,213 32.4 4,609 67.6
Los Angeles 978,142 66.8 485,186 33.2
Madera 9,974 37.2 16,825 62.8
Marin 69,751 79.4 18,147 20.6
Mariposa 2,499 38.2 4,038 61.8
Mendocino 17,340 71.8 6,825 28.2
Merced 18,945 50.1 18,848 49.9
Modoc 770 27.2 2,061 72.8
Mono 1,632 53.1 1,442 46.9
Monterey 51,315 61.4 22,591 30.6
Napa 25,846 68.2 12,059 31.8
Nevada 20,976 54.6 17,419 45.4
Orange 275,707 44.4 344,817 55.6
Placer 51,241 45.4 61,604 54.6
Plumas 2,966 41.7 4,139 58.3
Riverside 165,340 47.1 185,805 52.9
Sacramento 202,416 62.3 122,342 37.7
San Benito 8,654 63.5 4,969 36.5
San Bernardino 134,417 46.9 152,458 53.1
San Diego 346,419 51.1 331,942 48.9
San Francisco 196,745 88.2 26,442 11.8
San Joaquin 62,614 53.5 54,331 46.5
San Luis Obispo 46,606 53.5 54,331 46.5
San Mateo 120,280 75.2 39,615 24.8
Santa Barbara 64,912 58.3 46,503 41.7
Santa Clara 288,732 72.9 107,113 27.1
Santa Cruz 56,977 78.6 15,499 21.4
Shasta 21,509 38.1 35,007 61.9
Sierra 679 44.2 857 55.8
Siskiyou 6,103 44.2 7,717 55.8
Solano 57,874 64.6 31,754 35.4
Sonoma 107,328 74.8 36,249 25.2
Stanislaus 46,566 51.5 43,786 48.5
Sutter 8,688 42.7 11,644 57.3
Tehama 5,408 35.2 9,952 64.8
Trinity 1,711 44.2 2,163 55.8
Tulare 23,708 38.4 37,996 61.6
Tuolumne 7,951 46.7 9,058 53.3
Ventura 106,072 53.1 93,797 46.9
Yolo 31,431 69.1 14,043 30.9
Yuba 5,166 41.6 7,245 58.4

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://elections.cdn.sos.ca.gov/sov/2014-general/pdf/2014-complete-sov.pdf
  2. ^ "Summary of Qualifications and Requirements for the Offices of Governor and Lieutenant Governor". California Secretary of State Department. Archived from the original on July 6, 2014. Retrieved May 24, 2014.
  3. ^ "Campaign Finance: Brown For Governor 2014". California Secretary of State. Retrieved August 6, 2013.
  4. ^ "Brown Shows Early Lead for 2014 California Gubernatorial Race". IVN. Retrieved August 6, 2013.
  5. ^ "Governor: Tim Donnelly congratulates Neel Kashkari". IVN. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  6. ^ "Jerry Brown Coasts To Re-Election With Nonexistent Campaign". Huffington Post. Retrieved November 30, 2014.
  7. ^ "Key Dates and Deadlines: June 3, 2014, Statewide Direct Primary Election". California Secretary of State. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved February 1, 2014.
  8. ^ a b c "Preliminary statewide candidates Form 501 status report" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 11, 2014. Retrieved March 19, 2014.
  9. ^ "California Gov. Jerry Brown to run for reelection". The Sacramento Bee. February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  10. ^ a b c d "Forecast: Who Will Run for California Governor in 2014?". IVN.us. November 3, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  11. ^ Associated Press. Attorney General Harris to announce re-election bid. KPCC, Feb. 11, 2014. Retrieved Feb. 28, 2014.
  12. ^ ABC7 Eyewitness News. Gavin Newsom announces candidacy for re-election for Lieutenant Governor of California. Twitter.com. Mar. 6, 2014.
  13. ^ "Hilda Solis, Next CA Gov? All Options Open for Outgoing Labor Secretary". Latino.foxnews.com. January 17, 2013. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
  14. ^ Orlov, Rick (June 21, 2013). "Antonio Villaraigosa reflects on eight years". Los Angeles Daily News. Retrieved February 28, 2014.
  15. ^ a b c d e "Certified list of candidates for the June 3, 2014 statewide direct primary election". California Secretary of State. Missing or empty |url= (help); |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  16. ^ Mehta, Seema (March 21, 2014). "GOP candidate for governor is a registered sex offender". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
  17. ^ Siders, David (November 5, 2013). "Republican Tim Donnelly announces bid for California governor". Sacramento Bee. Retrieved February 28, 2014.
  18. ^ Mehta, Seema (January 21, 2014). "Neel Kashkari, ex-Treasury official, running for California Governor". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  19. ^ Seema Mehta (February 26, 2014). "Laguna Hills mayor enters governor's race". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 28, 2014.
  20. ^ Seema Mehta (April 29, 2014). "John and Ken to host debate for GOP governor candidates". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 5, 2014.
  21. ^ "Former Lt. Governor Abel Maldonado confirms he'll run for governor". Retrieved August 22, 2013.
  22. ^ Mehta, Seema (January 16, 2014). "Abel Maldonado ends California gubernatorial bid: 'Now is not my time'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 16 January 2014.
  23. ^ Galvin, Andrew (June 10, 2013). "Supervisor Moorlach won't run for governor". The Orange County Register. Retrieved June 14, 2013.
  24. ^ "Steve Poizner: "I would have been a much, much stronger candidate than Meg Whitman against Jerry Brown"". Blog.sfgate.com. Retrieved 2013-09-27.
  25. ^ "George Radanovich to announce he won't run for governor". ABC30. March 6, 2014. Retrieved March 11, 2014.
  26. ^ "HP Hires Former eBay Head Meg Whitman As CEO". NPR. 2011-09-23. Retrieved 2013-09-27.
  27. ^ Worthen, Ben (2011-09-23). "H-P Names Whitman CEO, Lane Executive Chair - WSJ.com". Online.wsj.com. Retrieved 2013-09-27.
  28. ^ "Green Party Announce California Governor Candidate | DC". Democracychronicles.com. 2013-08-17. Retrieved 2013-09-21.
  29. ^ Siders, David. "Capitol Alert: Activist Cindy Sheehan plans run for California governor in 2014". Blogs.sacbee.com. Retrieved 2013-09-21.
  30. ^ Ratajczak, Jim (March 3, 2011). "Candidate Ambrozewicz born to run". Mountain Democrat. Retrieved February 28, 2014.
  31. ^ Norwood, Juliana (August 1, 2013). "Christian conglomerate strives to employ a struggling community". Our Weekly. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  32. ^ "Statement of Vote June 3, 2014, Statewide Direct Primary Election" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  33. ^ "2014 Governor Race Ratings for November 3, 2014". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  34. ^ "The Crystal Ball's Final 2014 Picks". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  35. ^ "2014 Gubernatorial Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  36. ^ "2014 Elections Map - 2014 Governors Races". Real Clear Politics. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  37. ^ "Statement of Vote November 4, 2014, General Election" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  38. ^ "Complete Statement of vote" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 10 October 2018.

External links[edit]