This is a good article. Follow the link for more information.

Call Me by Your Name (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Call Me by Your Name
The theatrical release poster for Call Me by Your Name, showing two main characters, Oliver and Elio, leaning on each other's shoulders with the film's tagline above.
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Luca Guadagnino
Produced by
Screenplay by James Ivory
Based on Call Me by Your Name
by André Aciman
Starring
Cinematography Sayombhu Mukdeeprom
Edited by Walter Fasano
Production
company
  • Frenesy Film Company
  • La Cinéfacture
  • RT Features
  • M.Y.R.A. Entertainment
  • Water's End Productions
Distributed by
Release date
  • January 22, 2017 (2017-01-22) (Sundance)
  • November 24, 2017 (2017-11-24) (United States)
  • January 18, 2018 (2018-01-18) (Brazil)
  • January 25, 2018 (2018-01-25) (Italy)
  • February 28, 2018 (2018-02-28) (France)
Running time
132 minutes[1]
Country
  • Italy
  • United States
  • Brazil
  • France
Language
  • English
  • Italian
  • French
  • German
Budget $3.4 million
Box office $41.9 million[2]

Call Me by Your Name (Italian: Chiamami col tuo nome) is a 2017 coming-of-age drama film directed by Luca Guadagnino and written by James Ivory. The film, based on André Aciman's 2007 novel of the same name, is the final installment in Guadagnino's thematic "Desire" trilogy, after I Am Love (2009) and A Bigger Splash (2015). Set in northern Italy in 1983, Call Me by Your Name chronicles a romantic relationship between 17-year-old Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) and his professor father's 24-year-old graduate-student assistant Oliver (Armie Hammer). The film also stars Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel, and Victoire Du Bois.

The film began development in 2007, when producers Peter Spears and Howard Rosenman optioned the screen rights to Aciman's novel. Ivory served as the screenwriter and co-producer; he was initially set to co-direct the film but stepped down in 2016. Guadagnino joined the project as a location consultant and eventually became director and co-producer. The film was financed by several international companies. Principal photography mainly took place in Crema, Italy in May and June 2016. The filmmakers spent weeks before production decorating the Villa Albergoni, one of the main filming locations. Cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom shot the film on 35 mm film. Guadagnino curated the selection for the film's soundtrack, which features three original songs by Sufjan Stevens.

Call Me by Your Name was chosen for distribution by Sony Pictures Classics before its world premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival on January 22, 2017. It began a limited release in the United States on November 24, 2017, and went to general release on January 19, 2018. The film gained accolades for its screenplay, direction, acting, and music. At the 90th Academy Awards, it received four nominations, including Best Picture, and won for Best Adapted Screenplay. Ivory also won awards for his screenplay at the 23rd Critics' Choice Awards, the 70th Writers Guild of America Awards, and the 71st British Academy Film Awards. A sequel to the film was announced in January 2018.

Plot[edit]

In the summer of 1983, 17-year-old Elio lives with his parents in rural Northern Italy. His father, a professor of archaeology, invites a 24-year-old graduate student, Oliver, to live with him and his family over the summer and help with his academic paperwork. Elio, an introspective bibliophile and a talented musician, initially finds little in common with Oliver, who has a contrastingly carefree and exuberant personality. Elio resents having to give up his bedroom for Oliver for the duration of his stay. Elio spends much of the summer reading, playing piano, and hanging out with his girlfriend, Marzia. Oliver is meanwhile attracted to one of the local girls, much to Elio's annoyance.

Elio and Oliver swim together, go for long walks into town, and accompany Elio's father on an archaeological trip. Elio begins a sexual relationship with Marzia and brags about it in front of Oliver to gauge his reaction, but nonetheless finds himself increasingly attracted to Oliver. He sneaks into Oliver's room to smell his bathing suit, and thinks about him while masturbating. During a trip to the post office, Elio indirectly confesses his feelings to Oliver, who tells him he should not act on them. Later that day, Elio and Oliver kiss, but Oliver is reluctant to go any further. The two grow distant.

In response to a note from Elio, Oliver leaves a message on Elio's desk suggesting they meet at midnight. Elio spends the day with Marzia but longs to see Oliver. At midnight, he approaches Oliver and they have sex. They become more physically and emotionally intimate over the next few days, having sex frequently while keeping their relationship secret. In bed, Oliver tells Elio, "Call me by your name and I'll call you by mine". Now smitten with Oliver, Elio starts avoiding Marzia.

As the end of Oliver's stay approaches, the couple find themselves overcome by uncertainty and longing. Elio's parents—who are privately aware of the bond between the two, but do not address it openly—recommend they visit Bergamo together before Oliver returns to the United States. After spending three romantic days together, Elio, heartbroken, calls his mother and asks her to pick him up and take him home. Marzia, who still wants to be friends with Elio, is sympathetic. His father, seeing Elio's sadness, tells him he was aware of their relationship, confesses to almost having had a similar relationship in his own youth, and urges Elio to learn and grow from his grief, instead of quickly moving on.

During Hanukkah, Oliver telephones Elio's family to tell them he is engaged to be married. Oliver tells Elio he "remembers everything" very clearly. After the call, Elio sits by the fireplace, distraught, as his parents and the house staff prepare a holiday dinner.

Cast[edit]

Cast list adapted from Fandango.[3]

Styles and themes[edit]

Call Me by Your Name is the final installment in Luca Guadagnino's thematic "Desire" trilogy, following I Am Love (2009) and A Bigger Splash (2015).[5][6] Guadagnino described his approach in the film as "lighthearted and simple";[7][8] it is a departure from his "highly stylised [and] dazzling" previous work, according to Jordan Hoffman of The Guardian.[9] Guadagnino considers Call Me by Your Name a "homage to the fathers of my life: my own father, and my cinematic ones", referring to filmmakers Jean Renoir, Jacques Rivette, Éric Rohmer, and Bernardo Bertolucci, who inspired him.[10]

Guadagnino has described Call Me by Your Name as a family-oriented film for the purpose of "transmission of knowledge and hope that people of different generations come to see the film together."[11] He saw it not as a "gay" movie but as a film about the "beauty of the newborn idea of desire, unbiased and uncynical", reflecting his motto of living "with a sense of joie de vivre"[7][8] whereby "we should always be very earnest with one's feelings, instead of hiding them or shielding ourselves."[5] He considered it an "uplifting film" about "being who you want to be and finding yourself into the gaze of the other in his or her otherness."[12]

The director tried to avoid the flaws he had seen in most coming-of-age films, in which growth is often portrayed as being a result of resolving preconceived dilemmas such as an enforced choice between two lovers.[13] He also wanted the story to follow two people in the moment, rather than focus on an antagonist or a tragedy—[8]an approach inspired by À nos amours (1983), directed by Maurice Pialat.[13][14] As someone who considers sex in film a representation of the characters' behavior and identity,[15] Guadagnino was not interested in including explicit sex scenes in the film.[16] He explained his intention: "I wanted the audience to completely rely on the emotional travel of these people and feel first love... It was important to me to create this powerful universality, because the whole idea of the movie is that the other person makes you beautiful—enlightens you, elevates you."[16]

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

An elderly Caucasian man with white hair wearing a white jacket and a white-and-blue-striped shirt.
James Ivory, pictured in September 1991, took six to nine months to write the script and was on set to co-direct the film.

American producers Peter Spears and Howard Rosenman saw an early proof of André Aciman's debut novel Call Me by Your Name in 2007, and bought the screen rights before it was published.[17] Rosenman first heard about the book through a friend after acting in Milk (2008) and described it as "divine";[18] Spears was moved by it and felt it deserved a cinematic adaptation, which became the first feature film for which he was credited as producer.[19] They invited their friend James Ivory to work as an executive producer on the film adaptation.[20] Spears and Rosenman began production in 2008.[21] The project was soon in "development hell":[22] the producers met with three sets of directors and writers—among them Gabriele Muccino, Ferzan Özpetek, and Sam Taylor-Johnson[23]—but could not find anyone who would commit to the project.[17][24] Scheduling filming in Italy during the summer also proved difficult.[17][24]

The producers contacted Guadagnino, their first choice to direct, but he declined, citing a busy schedule.[6][21] Living in northern Italy, he was initially hired as a location consultant instead,[13][25] to help "put the movie together from the Italian side."[7] Guadagnino later suggested that he co-direct the film with Ivory but no contractual agreement was put in place.[7][22] Ivory accepted the offer,[22] and spent between six and nine months in 2014 working on the screenplay.[20][26] He put together more than 100 pages of notes during the process.[27] Guadagnino, who has described the novel as "a Proustian book about remembering the past and indulging in the melancholy of lost things,"[14] wrote the adaptation with Ivory while also collaborating with Walter Fasano.[7][11] Screenwriting took place at Ivory's house, Guadagnino's kitchen table in Crema, and sometimes in New York City.[28] Ivory hardly met Guadagnino during the process, for the latter was preoccupied making A Bigger Splash (2015).[26]

The screenplay was completed in late 2015.[26] Aciman approved it and commended the adaptation as "direct ... real and persuasive". He added, "as the writer I found myself saying, 'Wow, they've done better than the book.'"[17] The completed screenplay was vital in securing funding for the film.[20][22] Among the financiers were the production companies La Cinéfacture (France), Frenesy Film Company (Italy, owned by Guadagnino), M.Y.R.A. Entertainment (United States), RT Features (Brazil), and Water's End Productions (United States). The project was also supported by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism.[11][29][30] The backers considered the film "too expensive";[31] during negotiations, the production's budget was reduced from $12 million to $3.4 million, and the filming schedule was cut down from 12 to 5 weeks.[30][32]

In 2016, Ivory stepped down from directing, leaving Guadagnino to helm the film alone.[6][7] According to Ivory, financiers from Memento Films International did not want two directors to be involved with the project because they "thought it would be awkward ... It might take longer, it would look terrible if we got in fights on the set, and so on."[20][26] Guadagnino said Ivory's version would have likely been "a much more costly [and] different film" that could not have been made because of "market realities".[13][25] Ivory became the sole-credited screenwriter;[33] he later sold the rights to the screenplay to Guadagnino's company.[20][26] Call Me by Your Name was Ivory's first produced screenplay since Le Divorce (2003) and the only narrative feature he has written and not directed;[33] Ivory was involved with other aspects of the production.[33] Guadagnino dedicated the film to his friend Bill Paxton, who came to visit the set in Crema before his death in February 2017.[34]

Adaptation[edit]

Two middle-aged Caucasian men stand before a yellow curtain on stage.
Guadagnino's (left) adaptation differs from Ivory's script and its source material written by Aciman (right).

The film differs from its source material in several ways. The novel serves as a memory-piece from Elio's perspective, but the filmmakers set the movie entirely in the present timeline, a "much more efficient" solution, to help the audience understand the characters and "reflect the essence of the book", according to Guadagnino.[21][14] The setting was changed from Bordighera to the countryside of Crema, Lombardy, where Guadagnino lives.[b] Aciman felt that the town square selected for filming differed from that he had pictured in his novel, one he described was "far smaller and stood high on a hill overlooking a windswept Mediterranean"; the arid climate and "spookily deserted" landscape in Crema suggested to him that the film wouldn't correspond to the novel.[37] The director also changed the year of the events from 1987 to 1983—a year in which he said, "in Italy at least, when everything that was great about the '70s is definitely shut down", and one in which the characters "are in a way untouched by the corruption of the '80s—in the U.S., [Ronald] Reagan, and in the UK, [Margaret] Thatcher".[28][35] Ivory altered Mr. Perlman's profession from a classics scholar to "an art historian/archeologist type",[21][36] a decision that Aciman described as "perfect" and "more visual, [...] more exciting, as opposed to what a scholar does at his desk".[36]

Guadagnino was tempted to remove the scene in which Elio masturbates into a pitted peach, finding it too explicit.[17][38] Timothée Chalamet was also nervous about the scene,[39] describing it as "a metamorphosis of some of the strongest ideas in the movie" and the key to illuminating the character's "overabundant sexual energy".[21][40] Despite their reservations, Guadagnino and Chalamet each tested the method by themselves and both agreed it worked so it was included in the film.[41] A scene featuring Elio and Oliver dancing enthusiastically to The Psychedelic Furs' song "Love My Way" in a small bar is not drawn from the book but was inspired by Jonathan Demme's Something Wild (1986) and Guadagnino's experience of dancing by himself when he was young.[17][42]

When he was revising Ivory's draft of the script, Guadagnino removed the voice-over narration and much of the nudity.[14][25] According to Ivory, Guadagnino discussed how to film the scenes involving nudity, but later dropped it.[43] The director did not like the idea of having the main character tell the story retrospectively, stating that "it kills the surprise".[14] Towards the end of the novel, the two protagonists visit Rome together; the trip lasts an entire chapter and introduces new characters in multiple locations.[26][33] Because of the film's limited budget, Ivory and the producers wrote several variations, introducing the idea of having the lead characters left alone in the house; this was changed into another trip in which they spend time alone together.[26] Changes in Ivory's screenplay were made during the filming; the screenwriter was not present at the shooting set.[27]

In his original script, Ivory depicted Elio's parents discussing HIV/AIDS in two scenes,[43] and Elio decorating a Christmas tree in his family's home in the final scene.[27][33] Ivory had to reduce the length of Mr. Perlman's speech but was committed to keeping it in the script.[44] He described the scene in which Elio conveys his feelings to Oliver as one of the moments that captures the "euphoric passion and nervousness" of their first love.[45] Aciman was surprised by Guadagnino's final scene where Elio is seen crying by the fireplace.[37] He wrote of the film adaptation: "Cinema can be an entirely magical medium. What I do as a writer, and what Guadagnino does as a film director, is more than speak two different languages. What I do is chisel a statue down to its finest, most elusive details. What a film director does is make the statue move."[37]

Casting[edit]

In 2015, Shia LaBeouf and Greta Scacchi were reportedly set to be cast in the film.[46] In September 2016, Ivory confirmed they were no longer involved in the project. LaBeouf had read for the film in New York City, but the production company later felt he was unsuitable because of his personal troubles; although Ivory thought Scacchi and LeBeouf "had good scenes together" and could have made it into the film, the company disagreed.[47]

Guadagnino paid attention to Armie Hammer upon seeing his performance in The Social Network (2010).[7][41] The director found him to be a "sophisticated actor, with a great range" and considered him for the role of Oliver.[7] Hammer met with Guadagnino seven years before the film went into production, when the director was promoting I Am Love.[42] Hammer almost turned down the role after reading the draft script because it contained nudity. He said, "I did want to pass; it scared me"[48] and "There's a lot of stuff here that I've never done on film before. But there's no way I can't do this [film], mostly because it scares me so much."[49] According to Guadagnino, Hammer was going to pass on the role through his agent, but then changed his mind at the end of their conversation.[7][50] This is the third film in which Hammer has played an LGBT character, following J. Edgar (2011) and Final Portrait (2017).[38][51]

Two young Caucasian men sit behind a desk against a blue background with white text.
Hammer and Chalamet during the press conference for Call Me by Your Name at the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival

In 2013, Swardstrom—Spears's husband and agent—introduced Chalamet to Guadagnino,[7][15] who immediately felt the actor had "the ambition, the intelligence, the sensitivity, the naivety, and the artistry" to play Elio.[14] Chalamet read Aciman's novel by the time he was 17 and described it as "a window into a young person".[39] Chalamet, who had played piano and guitar for years, arrived in Italy five weeks early to prepare for his part by working with composer Roberto Solci.[21][30] His character, 17-year-old Elio, is fluent in three languages: English, French and Italian.[30] Chalamet already spoke French fluently, and took Italian lessons and gym workouts during his time in Italy.[21][52]

Michael Stuhlbarg was cast as Mr. Perlman, Elio's father.[49][53] Stuhlbarg did not start reading the book until he had already joined the production.[54] He was moved by the "many beautiful sentiments expressed" in the script, including Mr. Perlman's "sense of generosity and love and understanding".[55] Esther Garrel was contacted by Guadagnino when he was in Paris for the promotion of A Bigger Splash.[56] Garrel was cast as Marzia without any test, and chose not to read the book before shooting.[56] Towards the end of the film, Marzia asks Elio, "Friend for life?"— a line taken from J'entends plus la guitare (1991), directed by the actress's father, Philippe Garrel.[31] "I like the idea of talking virtually with Philippe Garrel through her", Guadagnino said.[31] Garrel spoke French with Chalamet on set; to improve her English, she watched the American sitcom Friends with English subtitles during shooting.[56]

The director chose Amira Casar, who he had known for twenty years, for the role of Annella.[31][53] He admired her "sense of the transgression" and said that she represents "the most audacious test of European art cinema".[31] Casting director Stella Savino met Vanda Capriolo when Capriolo was bicycling in the countryside. Capriolo, who was not an actor, was chosen to play the maid, Mafalda.[42][57] Aciman and Spears also appear briefly in cameo roles as Mounir and Isaac, a gay couple who attend a dinner party.[21][36] Aciman was asked to be in the movie after actors became unavailable. "It was a last-minute decision", Spears recalled, "Andrė turns out to be a phenomenal actor! So comfortable, not nervous at all. His wife was sitting there and said, 'I had no idea!' "[58] The characters switch between English, French, Italian;[59] a scene where Annella reads German translations of 16th century French literature can be seen in the film.[60]

Hammer and Chalamet both signed contracts that prohibited full-frontal nudity. Ivory, whose original screenplay contained nudity, was dismayed by the decision, criticizing what he saw as an "American" attitude and saying, "Nobody seems to care that much or be shocked about a totally naked woman. It's the men."[22][25] He later commented that the lack of nudity, due to the director's "aesthetic decision", feels "phoney".[43] Guadagnino, who remained involved in the casting,[49] picked actors based on their performances and chemistry rather than choosing to "investigate or label" their sexuality.[16] He said, "The idea that you have to cast only someone who has a certain set of skills, and worse, a certain gender identity in any role: that's oppressive to me."[6]

Production design and costume[edit]

The main location set for the Perlmans' residence was Villa Albergoni, an uninhabited 17th-century mansion in Moscazzano.[21][61] Guadagnino wanted to buy the house but could not afford it, so he made a film there instead.[30][62] A landscape designer was hired to construct an orchard in the mansion's garden.[57] A pergola was built on the patio, and apricot and peach trees were placed in the garden.[61][63]

Six weeks before production, the crew—including production designer Samuel Dehors and first-time set decorator Violante Visconti di Modrone—gradually decorated the house with furniture and objects inspired by the characters.[21][62] Much of the furniture, including the dishes and glassware from the 1950s, belonged to Guadagnino and di Modrone's parents. Di Modrone said, "That made it cozy and personal ... I wanted to give it the sense of time passing by".[64] Most of the Asia-inspired paintings, maps, and mirrors came from an antiques store in Milan.[63][64] Books seen in background were published before 1982.[57] The swimming pool used in the film was recreated from a watering trough common in the area.[21][64]

The filmmakers set up faded political billboards in public places to reflect the Italian general election in 1983,[57] and re-created a newsstand full of magazines of that time.[57] Guadagnino did not want the film to "look like a reflection on the 80s ... when it becomes [a period piece]."[13] His team researched extensively with help from the residents of Crema; they entered people's houses and collected their pictures of the 1980s.[13][65] Chen Li served as graphic designer; she wrote the titles of the opening credits, in which the director used photocopied images of statues and placed them with Mr. Perlman's personal items.[57]

Costume designer Giulia Piersanti avoided using period costumes; he wanted to provide "a sense of insouciant adolescent sensuality, summer heat and sexual awakening" to the characters.[64] Several costume pieces were made for the film from scratch.[57] The costumes were influenced by the French films Pauline at the Beach (1983), A Tale of Springtime (1990), and A Summer's Tale (1996).[64] For the Perlmans' wardrobe, Piersanti took inspiration from her parents' photograph albums. For Oliver's "sexy, healthy American" image, Piersanti referred to "some of Bruce Weber's earliest photographs".[64] His clothes change throughout the film as "he's more able to free himself".[57] Aiming to emphasize Elio's confident style, she chose several Lacoste costumes and a distinctive, New Romantic-looking shirt in the final scene.[13][64] For Elio, Piersanti picked some items from her husband's closet, including the polo shirt and Fido Dido T-shirt.[64]

Principal photography[edit]

Principal photography on Call Me by Your Name lasted around 33 days.[57][66] It began on May 9, 2016, and was completed in June 2016.[47][67][68] Reports of the process only appearing after filming had been underway for two weeks.[69][70][71] The film was shot primarily in Crema and the province of Cremona.[7][10][72][73] Photography took place during an unexpected, heavy rainstorm in Italy that was described by Spears as "the coldest, wettest, stormiest time in 200 years in Europe".[19][66] Scenes set in the nearby villages Pandino and Moscazzano were filmed from May 17, before moving to Crema on June 1.[74][75][76] Additional outdoor scenes were shot on December 4, 2016.[77][78] For the film, the City of Crema invested 18,000, including a publicity campaign cost €7,500.[79][80]

The arch of Torrazzo at Crema Cathedral and several historical locations in the streets of Crema and Pandino were chosen during production.[61][74] Businesses received compensation for financial losses caused by the closure, which was scheduled for May 30 and 31.[81] Two days' filming at the cathedral were postponed due to poor weather.[82] Filming also took place in the Lodigiano area near Crespiatica and two small towns Montodine and Ripalta near Crema.[61][21][77] The archaeological discovery scene was filmed at the Grottoes of Catullus in Sirmione on the Brescian shores of Lake Garda.[61] The trip to Bergamo was filmed at the exterior of multiple historical buildings, including Bergamo Cathedral, the Santa Maria Maggiore, the courtyard of Liceo Classico Paolo Sarpi in Piazza Rosate and the University of Sciences, Letters and Arts.[61] The train station scenes were filmed at Pizzighettone.[83] Because of security concerns, the production team was only granted permission to film at the Cascate del Serio in Valbondione for half an hour.[61][72][84]

Before and during filming, the actors lived in Crema and were able to experience small-town life.[21] Guadagnino engaged with the cast and filmmakers, and often cooked and showed films for them in his house.[17] Hammer and Chalamet, who did not have to do a screen test together,[14][85] met for the first time during production in Crema.[21][68] Before filming began, they spent a month together, watching Mike Tyson documentaries and going to local restaurants to build character development.[5][50][68] "We'd hang out with each other all the time, because we were pretty much the only Americans there, and we were able to defend one another and really get to know one another", Chalamet said.[52] During the first two days of production, Guadagnino read the script with the cast.[28] Hammer and Chalamet went to the kissing scene during the first rehearsal.[18][85] The actors rehearsed their scenes every night before filming and spent several days filming nude.[86] "I've never been so intimately involved with a director before. Luca was able to look at me and completely undress me", Hammer said.[41]

Guadagnino shot the film in chronological order,[28][87] which allowed the filmmakers to "witness the onscreen maturity of both protagonist and actor".[88] The scene in which Mr. Perlman delivers an educational speech to Elio was filmed on the penultimate day of filming.[5][28] Stuhlbarg spent months preparing for the scene,[5][55] which Guadagnino wanted to make "as simple as possible" by taking fewer setups and "let the actors be".[12] According to Fasano, the scene took three takes to film and Stuhlbarg was "on three different levels of getting emotional".[88] Garrel enjoyed filming her sex scene with Chalamet; she described it as being filled with "joy and simplicity".[56] Chalamet was listening to "Visions of Gideon", one of the original songs written for the film, in an earpiece while filming the final sequence,[89][90] in which the director asked him to perform for three variations—one per take.[91] The camera was set in the fireplace with nobody behind it. "It was bit of an acting experiment", Chalamet said.[42]

At the Piazza Vittorio Emanuele,[83] a memorial to the victims of the battle of the Piave located in Pandino,[37] the filmmakers laid a long camera dolly track and filmed the scene in which Elio tells Oliver of his feelings for him in one take to provide the flexibility and the "flow of emotion" a cut scene could not.[92] The scene was observed by Aciman in his first day on set.[37] During the dancing sequence, Hammer had to perform to the click track in front of 50 off-camera extras; the music was turned down so the dialogue could be recorded.[42][50] In preparation for the scene, a dance coach was arranged by Guadagnino.[42] Hammer said that it was "the worst scene" he had ever filmed.[93] Choreographer Paolo Rocchi, who was contacted by the Frenesy Film Company in June 2016, described the routine as "awkward and realistic".[94] Rosenman considered the scene one of the most emotional moments; he said "It embodied and encapsulated, for me, what teenage love is all about, what desire is all about."[18]

Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, who had previously collaborated with Guadagnino on Ferdinando Cito Filomarino's Antonia (2015), served as the director of photography.[15][71] He read Aciman's novel before receiving the script and walked around filming locations to "get a feeling for everything ... to see the color, to see how the light changed during the day, and input it into my data".[95] He had to use artificial lighting to capture the Northern Italian summer atmosphere for Call Me by Your Name,[7] to compensate for the heavy rains that lasted throughout the shoot.[15][66] He empathized with the actors during the confrontation scene between Oliver and Elio; Mukdeeprom cried in a corner of the room when they finished the first take.[7] The film was made using 35 mm celluloid and a single lens[96]—a decision influenced by the work of David Cronenberg to "solidif[y] the point of view"[8] and make "the tension of the performance come off the screen"—even if it meant increasing the production budget.[96] Guadagnino also praised Jean-Pierre Laforce, the sound designer and mixer of the film, for his "wonderful" and "pivotal" contribution to the film. He described the work as "visionary, even though it starts from reality".[12]

Post-production[edit]

Fasano collaborated with Guadagnino during the post-production.[97][30] They had worked together for 25 years since Guadagnino's debut feature The Protagonists (1999);[30] Fasano described working with him as "atypical... very demanding, but it's a great experience."[97] For Call Me by Your Name, post-production took only a month, between June and July[7]—the fastest they had edited.[68] Their first cut of the film was three hours and 20 minutes long;[97][98] Fasano said that was his favorite cut of the film, and made him "lose [him]self in the story and the images."[97] The final result lasts two hours and 10 minutes; its shooting ratio was 1:25.[97] The process came naturally; Fasano cited the "fast and unexplained" storytelling in Pialat's À nos amours as his inspiration.[97] The monologue sequence with Elio's father once had piano playing underneath,; the scene where the two protagonists bike to a courtyard almost failed to make the cut because one of the producers said that it was inconsequential.[88] Hammer revealed that some scenes were digitally altered to fix his wardrobe malfunction due to his short shorts.[99][100]

Guadagnino has confirmed a number of scenes that did not make the final cut. There was a "well-acted" scene where Elio and Oliver were "teasing one another" under a lime tree, which the director felt was "too precious".[38] A scene where Elio's parents make love in the bedroom while Elio and Oliver are kissing under the moonlight in the garden was also cut.[38] The latter scene was shown in a screening in Castiglioncello in June 2018, where another cut scene was also revealed, in which Elio invites Oliver to tour the village.[101]

Music[edit]

A young Caucasian man with short, dark hair plays a banjo.
Sufjan Stevens contributed three songs to the film's soundtrack.

Guadagnino selected the music for Call Me by Your Name himself.[21] He wanted to find an "emotional narrator to the film" through music, in a "less heavy, less present, and more enveloping" way than voice and text.[28] He was inspired by the films Barry Lyndon (1975), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), and The Age of Innocence (1993).[28] Guadagnino wanted the film's music to be connected to Elio, a young pianist who likes to transcribe and adapt piano pieces to deepen his relationship with Oliver.[14] Music is used in the film to reflect the period setting, the characters' family life and their level of education, and "the kind of canon they would be a part of".[14] Guadagnino also researched which pop songs had been frequently played on local radio stations that summer.[14][102]

Guadagnino found that Sufjan Stevens's lyrics resonated with him,[15] and asked Stevens to record an original song for Call Me by Your Name, and to narrate the film from the perspective of Elio at an older age.[15][89] Stevens declined the voiceover role,[89] but contributed three songs to the soundtrack: "Mystery of Love", "Visions of Gideon", and a re-recording of his 2010 song "Futile Devices".[14] Stevens was inspired by the film's script, the novel, and conversations with Guadagnino about the characters.[15] He submitted the songs a few days before filming began. Surprised by the result, Guadagnino listened to them on-set with the actors and editor Walter Fasano.[21][68] The project marks the first time Stevens had written songs explicitly for a feature-film soundtrack.[103][104]

A soundtrack album was released in digital formats by Madison Gate Records and Sony Classical on November 3, 2017,[105] and in physical formats on November 17, 2017.[106] It features songs by Stevens, The Psychedelic Furs, Franco Battiato, Loredana Bertè, Bandolero, Giorgio Moroder, Joe Esposito, and F. R. David, as well as music by John Adams, Erik Satie, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Johann Sebastian Bach, and Maurice Ravel.[107] As of February 1, 2018, the soundtrack has sold 9,000 copies and garnered 29 million on-demand audio streams for its tracks in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[108]

Release[edit]

Call Me by Your Name had its world premiere on January 22, 2017, at the Sundance Film Festival.[109][110] Sony Pictures Classics had acquired U.S. distribution rights for $6 million.[111] The deal was negotiated by WME Global and UTA Independent Film Group.[112] International distribution rights were purchased by Memento Films International, a French company that showed the promo reel at the American Film Market in November 2016.[29][113] The film was screened at the Berlin International Film Festival on February 13, 2017;[53] Toronto International Film Festival on September 7, 2017;[7][68][114] and New York Film Festival on October 3, 2017.[115] At the Beijing International Film Festival, it was originally scheduled for April 2018, but was removed from the official program with no explanation; Patrick Brzeski of The Hollywood Reporter wrote that the decision reflected the government's "consistent stance of intolerance toward gay content".[116][117] That year, the film was tributed at the Crema Film Festival: Aciman met with the public on June 23 and Garrel joined the screening at the Crema Cathedral on June 30.[118]

From left to right: Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Vanda Capriolo, Amira Casar, André Aciman, Esther Garrel, Victoire du Bois, and Peter Spears at the screening of Call Me by Your Name at the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival

Call Me by Your Name began a limited release in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2017,[10] and United States on November 24, 2017.[2] It expanded from four to thirty locations in the U.S. on December 15, 2017,[119] and then to 114 theaters on December 22.[120] It opened in 174 theaters in January 2018,[121] before going into wide release in 815 theaters a few days before the Oscar nomination announcement ceremony on January 19, 2018.[122][123] On the Oscars weekend, the film opened in 914 theaters, its widest release in the U.S.[124]

Warner Bros. Entertainment released the film in Italy on January 25, 2018.[125][126][127] Special screenings and a public meet-and-greet with Guadagnino, Hammer and Chalamet took place in Crema between January 27 and 30.[127][128][129] The film opened in Brazil on January 18,[130] and in France on February 28, 2018.[131] In March 2018, a distributor in Tunisia reported that the Ministry of Culture has banned the film as an "attack on liberties" because of its subject.[132][133] In Ireland, it became the longest-running film shown at the Light House Cinema in early June 2018, after a 30-week run.[134] In the Philippines, the film will be screened accompanied by a live performance of its soundtrack as performed by the Manila Symphony Orchestra on October 28.[135]

Marketing[edit]

Sony Pictures Classics released an official poster for Call Me by Your Name on July 27, 2017.[136] The first theatrical trailer was released on August 1, 2017.[137][138] On October 11, 2017, Sony Pictures Classics released a teaser titled "Dance Party" to celebrate National Coming Out Day.[139] The 42-second clip, consisting of a single take of Hammer and Chalamet dancing to "Love My Way" in a bar, became a meme on Twitter.[140][141][142] Because of its use in the clip, "Love My Way" gained popularity on music-streaming websites and rose 13% on on-demand streams during the two months before the film's release. In the week ending November 30, 2017, the song collected 177,000 on-demand streams, its biggest streaming week in the U.S.[143]

Reaction to the advertisement on social media was somewhat negative, largely because of Sony Pictures' misleading use of an image of Chalamet and Garrel instead of a focus on the protagonists' relationship.[144] Daniel Megarry of Gay Times described it as "an attempt to 'straight-wash' the movie's predominant same-sex romance";[145] Benjamin Lee of The Guardian called it a "disastrous attempt to push Oscar-buzzed Call Me by Your Name as a straight love story", and said the advert "belies an industry awkwardly denying queerness".[146] Sony Pictures Classics later aired several commercial spots to promote the film during its U.S.-wide expansion on January 19, 2018.[122] In South Korea, Sony Pictures released several never-before-seen photos taken on set, along with pastel promotional pictures, illustrated by Son Eunkyoung in March 2018.[147][148]

Home media[edit]

A pirated copy of an awards-screener DVD of Call Me by Your Name, along with copies of Last Flag Flying and fellow Oscar nominees I, Tonya and Lady Bird, was leaked onto piracy file-sharing websites by the hacker group Hive-CM8 on December 24, 2017.[149][150][151] The film was officially released for digital download on February 27, 2018.[152] It was released on Blu-ray and DVD on March 13, 2018, with two bonus featurettes ("In Conversation with Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg & Luca Guadagnino" and "Snapshots of Italy: The Making of Call Me by Your Name"), an audio commentary track by Chalamet and Stuhlbarg, and the music video for "Mystery of Love".[93][152][153] The film made $1,336,207 in DVD sales and $1,713,563 in Blu-ray sales in the United States, for a total of $3,049,770 in home media sales.[154] In the United Kingdom, the DVD charted at number 7 and the Blu-ray at number 4 on Top 100 sales for both formats.[155][156]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Call Me by Your Name grossed $18.1 million in the United States and Canada, and $23.7 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $41.8 million against a production budget of $3.4 million.[2] The film was Sony Pictures Classics' third-highest-grossing release of 2017.[157]

In the United States, Call Me by Your Name began its limited run on November 24, 2017, at The Paris Theater and Union Square Theatre in New York City, and the ArcLight Hollywood and Landmark Theater in Los Angeles.[158] The film made $404,874 in its opening weekend—a per-theater average of $101,219.[159][160] It was the highest average of 2017—the biggest since that of La La Land the previous December—[161] and had the best per-screen opening for a gay romance film since Brokeback Mountain (2005).[159][162] In its second weekend, the film grossed $281,288,[163][164] with an "excellent" per-screen average of $70,320.[165][166] The film expanded to nine theaters in its third weekend, grossing $291,101 for a "solid" $32,345 per-theater average.[167] It earned $491,933 from 30 theaters in its fourth weekend, averaging $16,398.[119] The film expanded to 114 theaters in its fifth week and grossed $850,736, averaging $7,463 per screen.[120] It crossed $6 million in its seventh weekend, earning $758,726 from 115 locations.[168] It grossed $715,559 from 174 theaters in its eighth weekend, averaging $4,185 per screen.[121]

In its nationwide release week—ninth weekend overall—the film grossed $1.4 million from 815 theaters, an under-performance compared to "some of its competition with similar theater counts," according to Deadline Hollywood.[122][123] The following weekend, after the announcement of its four Oscar nominations, the film's revenues dropped 6% to $1.3 million.[169][170] With the total gross revenue of $9,370,359 by the week of January 23, 2018, Call Me by Your Name was the second-lowest-grossing film among Best Picture nominees.[171] Fandango reported that the film had experienced a 56% increase in ticket sales since its Best Picture nomination was announced.[172] Regarding the film's "lagging" box-office performance, Tom Brueggemann of IndieWire commented that Sony Picture Classic "has done an able job so far", and said "at some point the film and the reaction to it is something no distributor can overcome".[173] It grossed $919,926, averaging $1,006, from 914 theaters during the Oscar weekend,[124] and went on to earn $304,228 from 309 theaters in its sixteenth weekend.[174]

Call Me by Your Name opened at number 7 in Italy with €781,000, and obtained the best per-theater average of the week.[175] It made €49.170 on February 6, and went on to reach €2 million by the end of the week.[176] It re-entered at number 10 on March 13 by making another €13.731 at the box office.[177] As of July 6, 2018, the film had grossed $3,925,137 in Italy.[154] It attracted 17,152 viewers in France on its first day of screening, with an "excellent" per-theater average of 184 entries.[178] It went on to attract 108,500 viewers in the opening weekend, earning 1,167 viewings—the second-best average of the week;[179] and 238,124 viewers in its third weekend.[180] As of April 17, 2018, the film had grossed $2,652,781 in France.[154] In the United Kingdom, the film earned £231,995 ($306,000) from 112 screens in its opening weekend,[181] including £4,000 from previews.[182] After ten days, it had made £568,000 ($745,000),[183] before reaching the $1 million mark (£767,000) in its third weekend.[184][185] As of May 21, 2018, the film had grossed $2,372,382 in the United Kingdom.[154]

Critical response[edit]

At its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, Call Me by Your Name received a standing ovation.[186] When it screened at Alice Tully Hall as part of the New York Film Festival, it received a ten-minute ovation, the longest in the festival's history.[35][187] On review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 95% based on 299 reviews, with an average rating of 8.7/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Call Me by Your Name offers a melancholy, powerfully affecting portrait of first love, empathetically acted by Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer."[188] It was the best-reviewed limited release and the second-best-reviewed romance film of 2017 on the site.[189][190] On Metacritic, the film has an average weighted score of 93 out of 100, based on 51 critics, indicating "universal acclaim".[191] It was the year's fifth-best rated film on Metacritic.[192]

A middle-aged Caucasian man with receding short black hair, a short graying beard, and a mustache stands before a blue background with white text. He wears a tweed jacket, a blue sweater, and a collared, white shirt.
Guadagnino's direction was particularly praised by critics.

Writing for The Hollywood Reporter, Boyd van Hoeij described Call Me by Your Name as an "extremely sensual ... intimate and piercingly honest" adaptation of Aciman's novel, and called Chalamet's performance "the true breakout of the film".[193] Peter Debruge of Variety believed the film "advances the canon of gay cinema" by portraying "a story of first love ... that transcends the same-sex dynamic of its central couple". He compared Guadagnino's "sensual" direction with the films of Pedro Almodóvar and François Ozon, and put Call Me by Your Name "on par with the best of their work".[110] David Ehrlich of IndieWire also praised Guadagnino's directing, which he said helps the film "match the artistry and empathy" of Carol (2015) and Moonlight (2016).[194] Sam Adams of BBC stated that Stuhlbarg's performance "puts a frame around the movie's painting and opens up avenues we may not have thought to explore", and called it "one of his finest" to date. He extolled the film as one of "many movies that have so successfully appealed to both the intellectual and the erotic since the heydays of Patrice Chéreau and André Téchiné".[195]

Ty Burr of The Boston Globe gave the film three-and-a-half stars, commended the director for "broaden[ing] his embrace of humanity while hitting new heights of cinematic bliss", and said that the film "may be a fantasy but it's one that's lovely and wise".[196] David Morgan of CBS praised the cinematography, production design, and costuming for "making a summer in the 1980s palpably alive again". He found Stuhlbarg's character "the most forward-thinking parent in movie history".[197] Richard Lawson wrote that Guadagnino's adaptation "was made with real love, with good intentions, with a clarity of heart and purposeful, unpretentious intellect" and hailed it as a "modern gay classic" in his Vanity Fair review.[198] Chicago Tribune's Michael Phillips was pleased by the "wonderfully paradoxical" visual interests from the director and said Stevens's songs "work like magic on your sympathies regarding Elio's emotional awakening". He praised Hammer's performance as one of "the most easy-breathing and relaxed best work of his career".[199]

The Economist noted the tension "between pain and pleasure" in the film and praised Chalamet, stating that he "evokes so many shades of humanity, portraying a path of youthful self-discovery that is more raw, unhinged, and ultimately honest than many actors could manage".[200] Kate Taylor of The Globe and Mail, who gave the film two-and-a-half stars, also enjoyed Chalamet's effort in capturing "first love and its inevitable heartbreak" and said the "multilingual, almost-pre-AIDS idyll does not stretch credulity ... but it can try the patience".[201] Ken Eisner of The Georgia Straight said that "Guadagnino's lyrical excesses ... can alternate wildly between the poetically incisive and the indulgently preposterous".[202] In a negative review, Kyle Turner of Paste wrote, "The details of the film are too small for anyone, perhaps particularly a queer person, to see"; a visual distance that "suggests that the film, in the beginning, is as terrified as Elio initially is. It never gets over that hesitation."[203] Armond White of Out called the movie "craven commercialism" and a "super-bourgeois fantasy" that "exploit[s] the queer audience's romantic needs by packaging them and falsifying them".[204] Luke Y. Thompson of Forbes criticized its length and called it an "excruciatingly boring travelogue".[205]

Accolades[edit]

Call Me by Your Name was selected by the National Board of Review and the American Film Institute as one of the top 10 films of the year.[206][207] At the 90th Academy Awards, it was nominated for Best Picture, Best Actor (Chalamet), Best Original Song ("Mystery of Love"), and Best Adapted Screenplay, winning the latter.[208][209] Chalamet became the youngest Best Actor nominee since 1939, and Ivory became the oldest winner in any competitive category.[210] The film received four nominations at the 71st British Academy Film Awards, including Best Film and Best Direction, and won Best Adapted Screenplay for Ivory.[211][212] At the 75th Golden Globe Awards, it was nominated for Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama for Chalamet, and Best Supporting Actor for Hammer.[213]

The film received eight nominations at the 23rd Critics' Choice Awards; Ivory won Best Adapted Screenplay.[214] The film led the 33rd Independent Spirit Awards with six nominations, winning Best Male Lead for Chalamet and Best Cinematography for Mukdeeprom.[215][216] At the 24th Screen Actors Guild Awards, Chalamet received a nomination for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role.[217] The film went on to win the GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Film – Wide Release at its 29th ceremony.[218] In Italy, Fasano won Best Editing at the 73rd Nastro d'Argento Awards and 33rd Golden Ciak Awards.[219][220] The National Board of Review, the Gotham Independent Film Awards, and the Hollywood Film Awards awarded Chalamet with their Breakout Actor Awards.[221][222]

Sequel[edit]

Guadagnino has deliberated over the idea of a sequel since the film's premiere at Sundance, when he realized the characters "could go beyond the boundaries of the film".[38] In October 2017, he said he hoped to make a sequel to the film in 2020 that might be in the style of François Truffaut's The Adventures of Antoine Doinel series, telling the story of Oliver and Elio as they age. "If I paired the age of Elio in the film with the age of Timothée, in three years' time, Timothée will be 25, as would Elio by the time the second story was set", he said.[223][224] In the novel, Elio and Oliver reunite 15 years later when Oliver is married. Guadagnino said that in the sequel, "I don't think Elio is necessarily going to become a gay man. He hasn't found his place yet ... I believe that he would start an intense relationship with Marzia again". Guadagnino is interested in the politics of the 1990s, saying, "it would be the beginning of the [Silvio] Berlusconi era in Italy and it would mean dealing with the [first Gulf War] of Iraq".[225][226] In November 2017, Guadagnino shared his intention to make a series of five films, in which the audience could "see those actors grow older, embodying those characters".[38] A month later, he was reported to have begun writing a script for a sequel that would reveal more about Oliver and resemble Michael Apted's Up series.[227][228] Hammer and Chalamet have expressed interest in appearing in a sequel,[229] but Ivory has no interest in the material, saying "that's fine, good. But I don't know how they're going to get a 40-year-old [Chalamet]!"[33]

In January 2018, Guadagnino revealed the sequel will be set "right after the fall of Berlin Wall and that great shift that was the end of ... the USSR",[12] and that the first scene in the film could depict Elio watching Paul Vecchiali's Once More (1988)—the first French film to deal with AIDS—in a movie theater.[230] In March 2018, Guadagnino confirmed he will work with Aciman on the sequel, which will take place "five or six years afterwards" with "a different tone" than the first film.[231] He also said that Hammer and Chalamet will reprise their roles with a different backdrop, where they "go around the world".[231] Hammer said he was pitched the script by Guadagnino, saying: "it's not a finished script, but he's got all the ideas for it".[232] In April 2018, Aciman said in an interview for The Sydney Morning Herald that he and Guadagnino were "not sure" about the sequel, saying "[Guadagnino] has quite a few projects in line and so do I. So we are flirting with each other about the sequel but I don't know if we are very serious."[233] In July 2018, Stuhlbarg said that Guadagnino and Aciman were excited the project, and that the director was "serious" about it. He further expressed enthusiasm for reprising his role in the sequel, "I think it would have to be some kind of unique thing from what it was, but I would absolutely be game for trying."[234] Two months later, Hammer said of the sequel in an interview for Variety: "It will happen because there are already people working on it and trying to make it happen."[235]

In an interview for Time in October 2018, Chalamet compared the sequel to Richard Linklater's Boyhood (2014) and said that Hammer, Aciman and Guadagnino were all intended to return for the next film.[236] That same month, Guadagnino revealed that he has asked frequent collaborator Dakota Johnson to play Oliver's wife in the sequel. He described her character as "a New England kind of hoochie woman", who might also have children with Oliver. The director believed the film's title to be "the only problem", saying "It cannot be 'Call Me by Your Name Two.'"[237]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mr. Perlman's full name is mentioned in the film as Samuel "Sammy" Perlman.[4]
  2. ^ Liguria and Sanremo were once depicted as the main setting in the book.[21][35] Aciman, however, declared that the novel takes place in Bordighera, saying "I didn't want to name it in the book, but it's known. I go back to Bordighera all the time".[36] During his time as a location consultant, Guadagnino suggested Liguria as the main setting to the producers.[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Call Me by Your Name (2017)". British Board of Film Classification. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "Call Me by Your Name (2017)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved September 29, 2018.
  3. ^ "Call Me by Your Name (2017)". Fandango. Archived from the original on July 2, 2018. Retrieved July 2, 2018.
  4. ^ Rochlin, Margy (December 21, 2017). "Michael Stuhlbarg's 'fragile balancing act' in playing a supportive dad in 'Call Me by Your Name'". The Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 22, 2018. Retrieved July 2, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e Ryan, Patrick (January 24, 2017). "Sundance: Critics fall for Armie Hammer gay romance 'Call Me By Your Name'". USA Today. Park City, Utah. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  6. ^ a b c d Brady, Tara (October 19, 2017). "'Why do people want to see other people's penises?'". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Vivarelli, Nick (February 13, 2017). "Berlinale: Luca Guadagnino on Why 'Call Me by Your Name' Strikes Such Deep Chords". Variety. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved October 6, 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d Olivier, Martine (October 15, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino Talks 'Call Me By Your Name' And 'Suspiria'". The Playlist. Archived from the original on November 2, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  9. ^ Hoffman, Jordan (January 23, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name review: A Bigger Splash director makes waves with superb gay romance". The Guardian. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  10. ^ a b c Kellaway, Kate (January 24, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name's Oscar-tipped double act on their summer of love". The Guardian. Archived from the original on October 17, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  11. ^ a b c Meza, Ed (February 13, 2016). "Berlinale: 'Call Me by Your Name' Was a 'Universal Effort'". Variety. Archived from the original on February 18, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  12. ^ a b c d Goldberg, Matt (January 16, 2018). "Director Luca Guadagnino on 'Call Me by Your Name' and the Possibility of Sequels". Collider. Archived from the original on January 16, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g Blessing, Joe (January 24, 2017). "'Call Me By Your Name': Luca Guadagnino Discusses Avoiding Cliches, Costumes & Narration [NYFF]". The Playlist. Archived from the original on October 31, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Gilligan, Meghan (October 11, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino Discusses 'Call Me By Your Name' at the 55th New York Film Festival". Screenprism. Archived from the original on February 3, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Encinias, Joshua (October 11, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Team on Romance, Sufjan Stevens, Maurice Pialat, and Sequel Potential". The Film Stage. Archived from the original on January 19, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  16. ^ a b c Ashley Lee (February 8, 2017). "Why Luca Guadagnino Didn't Include Gay Actors or Explicit Sex Scenes in 'Call Me by Your Name' (Q&A)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 6, 2017. Retrieved March 6, 2017.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g Hicklin, Aaron (October 2, 2017). "The Art of Seduction: Armie Hammer & the Hottest Movie of the Season". Out. Archived from the original on December 29, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  18. ^ a b c Jortner, Michael (May 2, 2018). "Veteran movie producer recounts 10-year journey to make gay love story, 'Call Me by Your Name'". The Desert Sun. Archived from the original on October 17, 2017. Retrieved May 2, 2018.
  19. ^ a b Goldrich, Robert (February 21, 2018). "Producer & Director Perspectives On 'Call Me by Your Name'; Diving Into The Sound of 'Water'". Shoot. Road to Oscar (15). Archived from the original on June 15, 2018. Retrieved February 21, 2018.
  20. ^ a b c d e McKittrick, Christopher (May 15, 2017). "James Ivory on Screenwriting". Creative Screenwriting. CS Publications. Archived from the original on August 9, 2017. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Mongrel Presents: Call Me by Your Name" (PDF) (Press release). Toronto, Ontario: Mongrel Media. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 28, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  22. ^ a b c d e Vivarelli, Nick (October 6, 2017). "James Ivory on 'Call Me by Your Name' and Why American Male Actors Won't Do Nude Scenes (Exclusive)". Variety. Archived from the original on October 7, 2017. Retrieved October 6, 2017.
  23. ^ Santoni, Simona (January 26, 2018). "Chiamami col tuo nome: perché Luca Guadagnino piace agli americani" [Call me by your name: because Luca Guadagnino likes Americans]. Panorama (in Italian). Arnoldo Mondadori Editore. Archived from the original on January 27, 2018. Retrieved January 26, 2018.
  24. ^ a b Gray, Tim (November 8, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name': A Global Effort to Create a Simple, Well-Told Tale". Variety. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  25. ^ a b c d Sharf, Jack (October 6, 2017). "'Call Me By Your Name' Screenwriter is Disappointed There's No Male Full Frontal Nudity". IndieWire. Archived from the original on October 18, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g Roxborough, Scott (January 19, 2018). "James Ivory on His Film Legacy and Adapting 'Call Me by Your Name'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 19, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
  27. ^ a b c Juillerat, Lee (August 22, 2018). "Ivory film screening draws large audience". Herald and News. Adams Publishing Group. Archived from the original on August 21, 2018. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g Thompson, Anne (November 27, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here's Why". IndieWire. Archived from the original on November 28, 2017. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  29. ^ a b Marco, Camillo de (December 6, 2016). "Call Me by Your Name by Luca Guadagnino at Sundance". Cineuropa. Archived from the original on August 9, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g Grater, Tom (December 25, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino on the 10-year journey behind 'Call Me By Your Name'". Screendaily. Archived from the original on December 26, 2017. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  31. ^ a b c d e f Guichard, Louis (February 28, 2018). "Luca Guadagnino, réalisateur de 'Call me by your name' : 'Je ne supporte pas la pruderie'" [Luca Guadagnino, director of 'Call me by your name': 'I can not stand prudery']. Télérama (in French). Archived from the original on March 20, 2018. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  32. ^ Brunamonti, Filippo (September 11, 2017). "Toronto, 'Call me by your name': Guadagnino racconta l'estate di Elio e Oliver" [Toronto, 'Call me by your name': Guadagnino tells the story of Elio and Oliver]. la Repubblica (in Italian). Toronto: GEDI Gruppo Editoriale. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  33. ^ a b c d e f Erbland, Kate (November 23, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Screenwriter James Ivory Loves the Story Too Much to Think About Sequels". IndieWire. Archived from the original on November 23, 2017. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  34. ^ Kelly, Emma (October 24, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name producer gives beautiful reason why the film is dedicated to Bill Paxton". Metro. Archived from the original on December 24, 2017. Retrieved December 24, 2017.
  35. ^ a b c Garrett, Stephen (October 13, 2017). "Director Luca Guadagnino on Why 'Call Me by Your Name' Is Making Everyone Cry". The New York Observer. Archived from the original on October 13, 2017. Retrieved October 13, 2017.
  36. ^ a b c d "'Call Me by Your Name' Author Opens Up About the Film Adaptation". Graduate Center. City University of New York. November 10, 2017. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  37. ^ a b c d e Aciman, André (January 24, 2018). "'I Couldn't Write Silence': Call Me by Your Name Author André Aciman on the Oscar-Nominated Film Adaptation of His Novel". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  38. ^ a b c d e f Buchanan, Kyle (November 17, 2017). "Call Me by Your Name Director Luca Guadagnino on Armie Hammer, Sequels, and Screen Intimacy". Vulture. Archived from the original on November 18, 2017. Retrieved November 17, 2017.
  39. ^ a b Setoodeh, Ramin (October 4, 2017). "Timothee Chalamet on His Racy Sex Scene in 'Call Me By Your Name'". Variety. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  40. ^ Dry, Jude (January 11, 2018). "Timothée Chalamet & Armie Hammer on Sex Scenes in 'Call Me by Your Name': Awards Season Spotlight Profile". IndieWire. Archived from the original on March 13, 2018. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  41. ^ a b c Miller, Mike (October 4, 2017). "Armie Hammer's Call Me By Your Name Director Breaks Down the Film's Intimate Peach Scene". People. Archived from the original on October 5, 2017. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  42. ^ a b c d e f Maicki, Salvatore (March 15, 2018). "5 Behind-the-scenes Secrets From 'Call Me By Your Name'". i-D. Archived from the original on July 15, 2018. Retrieved March 15, 2018.
  43. ^ a b c Gilbey, Ryan (March 27, 2018). "James Ivory: why Ismail Merchant and I kept our love secret". The Guardian. Archived from the original on June 16, 2018. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
  44. ^ Ford, Rebecca (December 5, 2017). "Oscars: How Scene-Stealing Speeches in 'Call Me by Your Name,' 'The Post' Came to Be". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 22, 2017.
  45. ^ Ellwood, Gregory (November 16, 2017). "Coming-of-Age Dramas Make Mad Dash for Awards Season Glory". Variety. Archived from the original on November 22, 2017. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  46. ^ Hass, Nancy (September 11, 2015). "James Ivory's Home Befits His Extraordinary Life". The New York Times Style Magazine (T) (published September 13, 2015). p. M2191. Archived from the original on April 7, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  47. ^ a b Teodorczuk, Tom (September 23, 2016). "James Ivory on 'Howards End', Not Being Able to Work with Shia LaBeouf and Tom Hiddleston". Heat Street. Archived from the original on July 4, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  48. ^ Vlessing, Etan (August 9, 2017). "Toronto: Armie Hammer Says He Almost Turned Down Gay Romance Role". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on September 8, 2017. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  49. ^ a b c Hirschberg, Lynn (August 7, 2017). "Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet on Call Me By Your Name, the Year's Most Sensual Love Story". W. Archived from the original on August 7, 2017. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  50. ^ a b c Abramovitch, Seth (November 20, 2017). "Armie Hammer on His Steamy New Movie, a Charmed Upbringing and Oscar's 'Double Standards'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 20, 2017. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  51. ^ Gilbey, Ryan (September 28, 2017). "Armie Hammer on gay romance Call Me By Your Name: 'There were fetishes I didn't understand'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  52. ^ a b McConaughey, Matthew (June 2, 2017). "Timothee Chalamet". Interview. Archived from the original on September 19, 2017. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  53. ^ a b c "Berlinale: Archive: Annual Archives: 2017: Programme – Call Me by Your Name". Berlin International Film Festival. Archived from the original on August 6, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  54. ^ Utichi, Joe (November 16, 2017). "Michael Stuhlbarg Plays The Parent Everyone Wishes They Had In 'Call Me By Your Name'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 30, 2017. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  55. ^ a b Ford, Rebecca; Galupp, Mia; Lee, Ashley (November 15, 2017). "What This Year's Awards Contenders Can Teach About Parenthood". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 15, 2017. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  56. ^ a b c d Deruisseau, Bruno (March 2, 2018). "Le phénomène 'Call me by your name' raconté par son actrice, Esther Garrel" [The phenomenon 'Call me by your name' told by the actress, Esther Garrel]. Les Inrockuptibles (in French). Archived from the original on March 20, 2018. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  57. ^ a b c d e f g h i Gray, Tim (December 6, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino Shares How His 'Call Me by Your Name' Crew Created '80s Love Story Look". Variety. Archived from the original on December 20, 2017. Retrieved December 6, 2017.
  58. ^ Ford, Rebecca (November 10, 2017). "Oscars: Best Picture Contenders on Staging Car Chases and How to Pivot When Plans Go Awry". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 10, 2017. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  59. ^ "Call Me by Your Name". Toronto International Film Festival. Archived from the original on March 10, 2018. Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  60. ^ Weiss, Max (December 21, 2017). "Review: Call Me By Your Name". Baltimore. Archived from the original on February 1, 2018. Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  61. ^ a b c d e f g Spagnuolo, Eugenio (January 26, 2018). "Chiamami col tuo nome: i luoghi dove è stato girato il film di Guadagnino" [Call me by your name: the places where the film by Guadagnino was filmed]. Panorama (in Italian). Arnoldo Mondadori Editore. Archived from the original on January 27, 2018. Retrieved January 26, 2018.
  62. ^ a b Wrigley, Tish (November 1, 2017). "A Closer Look at the Sets of New Film Call Me By Your Name". Another. Archived from the original on November 1, 2017. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  63. ^ a b Moss, Hilary (November 20, 2017). "The Making of a Family Home in 'Call Me by Your Name'". The New York Times Style Magazine (T). Archived from the original on November 21, 2017. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  64. ^ a b c d e f g h Laffly, Tomris (November 23, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino Relied on a Pair of Longtime Friends for 'Call Me by Your Name' Decor, Costumes". Variety. Archived from the original on November 23, 2017. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  65. ^ Finos, Arianna (February 14, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino: 'Vi racconto l'amore gay nell'Italia di Craxi'" [Luca Guadagnino: 'I'll tell you about gay love in Craxi's Italy']. la Repubblica (in Italian). Berlin: GEDI Gruppo Editoriale. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  66. ^ a b c O'Falt, Chris (November 15, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Looks So Incredible You'd Never Guess It Was Shot During a Historic Rainstorm". IndieWire. Archived from the original on November 16, 2017. Retrieved November 15, 2017.
  67. ^ Maleszka, Jamie (May 4, 2016). "Interview: Luca Guadagnino Talks 'A Bigger Splash,' Stanley Kubrick, Leaving Room For The Audience, And More". The Playlist. p. 2. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017. We start shooting on May 9th. I am doing a movie from the novel by André Aciman called 'Call Me By Your Name.'
  68. ^ a b c d e f Ellwood, Gregory (September 8, 2017). "'Call Me By Your Name' Steals TIFF 2017 Opening Night Buzz". The Playlist. Archived from the original on September 14, 2017. Retrieved September 8, 2017.
  69. ^ Jagernauth, Kevin (December 5, 2016). "Sundance First Look: Jason Segel In 'The Discovery' & Armie Hammer In Luca Guadagnino's 'Call Me By Your Name'". The Playlist. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved December 5, 2016. Luca Guadagnino ... quietly shot 'Call Me By Your Name' over the summer ... with the film keeping its secrets close to the vest.
  70. ^ Jagernauth, Kevin (May 31, 2016). "Luca Guadagnino Now Filming 'Call Me By Your Name' Starring Michael Stuhlbarg & Armie Hammer". The Playlist. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  71. ^ a b Raup, Jordan (May 23, 2016). "Michael Stuhlbarg, Armie Hammer & More Leading Luca Guadagnino's 'Call Me By Your Name'". The Film Stage. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved June 5, 2016.
  72. ^ a b "Girato alle cascate del Serio il film in pista per 7 Oscar" [The film on track for 7 Oscars was shot at the Serio Falls]. Bergamo News (in Italian). December 15, 2017. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved December 15, 2017.
  73. ^ "Film girato alle cascate del Serio e in Città Alta: 4 nomination agli Oscar" [Film shot at the Serio Falls and in the Upper Town: 4 Oscar nominations]. Bergamo News (in Italian). January 23, 2018. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  74. ^ a b "Set cinematografico, centro chiuso due giorni" [Cinematography set, the center closed for two days]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Pandino: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published May 11, 2016). May 10, 2016. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  75. ^ Tozzi, Silvia (May 12, 2016). "Call me by your name, Guadagnino gira anche a Pandino. Le reazioni" [Call Me by Your Name, Guadagnino also turns to Pandino. The reactions]. Crema Online (in Italian). Archived from the original on August 9, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  76. ^ "Crema, ciak si gira" [Crema, ciak turns]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Pandino: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published June 1, 2016). May 31, 2016. Archived from the original on February 2, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  77. ^ a b "Riprese a Villa Albergoni, ancora ciak ma 'niente compensi'" [He resumed at Palazzo Albergoni, still silent but 'no compensation']. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Moscazzano: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published December 8, 2016). December 7, 2016. Archived from the original on December 9, 2016. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  78. ^ "Film di Guadagnino, saldati i conti" [Guadagnino's film, sold out]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published January 20, 2017). January 19, 2017. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved January 19, 2017.
  79. ^ "Crema set cinematografico: 'Ma ci costa 18mila euro'" [Movie Set in Crema: 'But it costs us 18,000 euros']. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A. May 29, 2016. Archived from the original on May 31, 2016. Retrieved May 29, 2016.
  80. ^ "Il lancio è negli Usa e Crema resta in attesa della 'prima'" [The launch is in the US and Crema is waiting for the 'first']. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published October 23, 2016). January 23, 2017. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  81. ^ "Piazza Duomo diventa un set, i commercianti vogliono un indennizzo" [Piazza Duomo becomes a set, traders want a compensation]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published May 8, 2016). May 7, 2016. Archived from the original on May 8, 2016. Retrieved May 28, 2016.
  82. ^ "La pioggia ferma il set cinematografico" [The rain stops the movie set]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published May 28, 2016). May 27, 2016. Archived from the original on May 29, 2016. Retrieved May 28, 2016.
  83. ^ a b Chua, Paolo (January 29, 2018). "A Call Me By Your Name-Themed Travel Guide to Northern Italy". Town & Country Philippines. Archived from the original on March 19, 2018. Retrieved July 28, 2018.
  84. ^ Mancini, Carolina (February 2, 2017). "Berlinale: Call me by your name made in Lombardia". Cinema & Video International. Archived from the original on December 20, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  85. ^ a b Setoodeh, Ramin (January 23, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Director Blasts Mike Pence for Anti-Gay Policies". Variety. Archived from the original on January 26, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  86. ^ Kohn, Eric (October 9, 2017). "Armie Hammer on Getting Naked in 'Call Me By Your Name,' Playing Hunks, and His James Woods Feud". IndieWire. Archived from the original on October 9, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  87. ^ Taylor, Trey (December 20, 2017). "The Untold Story Of Michael Stuhlbarg's Emotional Call Me By Your Name Speech". Interview. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  88. ^ a b c Desowitz, Bill (December 1, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name': Editing Was Crucial to the Year's Best Love Story". IndieWire. Archived from the original on December 4, 2017. Retrieved December 1, 2017.
  89. ^ a b c Utichi, Joe (December 13, 2017). "Sufjan Stevens Nearly Played The Narrator In Luca Guadagnino's 'Call Me By Your Name'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 21, 2018. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  90. ^ Pritchard, Tiffany (September 10, 2017). "Armie Hammer, Timothee Chalamet, Luca Guadagnino talk 'Call Me By Your Name' in Toronto". Screendaily. Archived from the original on December 26, 2017. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  91. ^ "In erotic 'Call Me By Your Name,' sunshine and summer love". ABC News. Associated Press. December 21, 2017. Archived from the original on January 7, 2018. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  92. ^ Giardina, Carolyn (December 12, 2017). "How 'Call Me by Your Name' Captured a Pivotal Love Confession in One Take". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on December 31, 2017. Retrieved December 12, 2017.
  93. ^ a b Russell, Scott (March 13, 2018). "Exclusive: Call Me By Your Name's Armie Hammer Recalls Shooting the 'Worst Scene' of His Life". Paste. Archived from the original on July 15, 2018. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  94. ^ Scardi, Rosanna (April 16, 2018). "Rocchi, il coreografo di Seriate "Le mie danze per Guadagnino Gli anni '80 sono diventati virali"". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). RCS MediaGroup. Archived from the original on April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  95. ^ Grobar, Matt (January 10, 2018). "Cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom On The Decision To Shoot 'Call Me By Your Name' With Only One Lens". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 10, 2018. Retrieved January 10, 2018.
  96. ^ a b Grater, Tom (October 11, 2017). "'Call Me By Your Name' director Luca Guadagnino: shooting on digital is 'laziness'". Screendaily. Archived from the original on October 11, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  97. ^ a b c d e f Grobar, Matt (January 9, 2018). "'Call Me By Your Name' Editor Walter Fasano On 'Suspiria' & Luca Guadagnino's Coppolian Factory Of Artists". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  98. ^ Weintraub, Steve "Frosty" (September 18, 2017). "Director Luca Guadagnino Reveals His First Cut of 'Call Me by Your Name' Was 4 Hours Long". Collider. Archived from the original on September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  99. ^ Gustashaw, Megan (November 30, 2017). "Armie Hammer's Balls Had to Be Edited Out of Call Me by Your Name". GQ. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on June 5, 2018. Retrieved November 30, 2017.
  100. ^ Desta, Yohana (November 29, 2017). "Armie Hammer Has the Most Ridiculous Digital Editing Story of the Year". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on July 28, 2018. Retrieved November 30, 2017.
  101. ^ Ulivi, Stefania (June 14, 2018). "Luca Guadagnino, con "Suspiria" il mio elogio della paura". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). RCS MediaGroup. Archived from the original on June 16, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  102. ^ Caulfield, Keith; Atkinson, Katie (December 12, 2017). "Pop Shop Podcast: Director Luca Guadagnino on Music's Vital Role in 'Call Me by Your Name'". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved December 12, 2017.
  103. ^ Eisinger, Dale (January 8, 2017). "Sufjan Stevens Soundtracks Upcoming Film Call Me By Your Name". Spin. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved January 8, 2017.
  104. ^ Willman, Chris (March 22, 2018). "Sufjan Stevens on How His Wary Dance With Hollywood Led to an 'Outrageous' Oscar Nom". Variety. Archived from the original on March 26, 2018. Retrieved March 22, 2018.
  105. ^ Nordine, Michael (November 3, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Soundtrack: Sufjan Stevens, the Psychedelic Furs, and More Lend Their Musical Stylings — Listen". IndieWire. Archived from the original on December 20, 2017. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  106. ^ "Call Me by Your Name Original Motion Picture Soundtrack - CD Available November 17" (Press release). Sony Classical. PR Newswire. November 6, 2017. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  107. ^ Raup, Jordan (November 3, 2017). "Listen: Full Soundtrack for 'Call Me by Your Name' Featuring New Songs by Sufjan Stevens". The Film Stage. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  108. ^ Caulfield, Keith (February 8, 2018). "How the Eclectic 'Call Me by Your Name' Soundtrack Became a Surprise Vinyl Hit -- Is Radio Next?". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 23, 2018. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  109. ^ Patten, Dominic (December 5, 2016). "Sundance 2017: Robert Redford, New Rashida Jones Netflix Series, 'Rebel In The Rye' & More On Premiere, Docu, Midnight & Kids Slates". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 18, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  110. ^ a b Debruge, Peter (January 23, 2017). "Sundance Film Review: 'Call Me by Your Name'". Variety. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (Premieres), Jan. 22, 2017
  111. ^ Seetodeh, Ramin (January 6, 2017). "Sundance: Gay Love Story 'Call Me By Your Name' Sells to Sony Pictures Classics (Exclusive)". Variety. Archived from the original on January 7, 2017. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  112. ^ Kilday, Gregg (January 6, 2017). "Sundance: Sony Classics Takes Gay Love Story 'Call Me by Your Name'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 8, 2017. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  113. ^ "AFM 2016" (PDF). Memento Films International. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 2, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  114. ^ Hammond, Pete (September 7, 2017). "Opening-Night Premieres 'Borg/McEnroe' And 'Call Me By Your Name' Are A Love Match As Toronto Gets Underway". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 25, 2017. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  115. ^ "Call Me by Your Name". New York Film Festival. Archived from the original on October 25, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  116. ^ Brzeski, Patrick (March 26, 2018). "Beijing Film Festival Drops 'Call Me by Your Name' As China Tightens Grip on Media". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 29, 2018. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
  117. ^ Li, Pei; Jourdan, Adam (March 6, 2018). Macfie, Nick, ed. "Beijing festival pulls award-winning gay film amid content squeeze". Beijing, Shanghai: Reuters. Archived from the original on April 4, 2018. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  118. ^ "Crema Film Festival, omaggio a Chiamami col tuo nome" [Crema Film Festival, a tribute to 'Call me by your name'] (in Italian). Cinecittà. May 5, 2018. Archived from the original on May 9, 2018. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  119. ^ a b Brooks, Brian (December 17, 2017). "'I, Tonya' Ices Robust Weekend; 'Disaster Artist', 'Shape of Water' & 'Call Me By Your Name' Expand – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on December 18, 2017. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  120. ^ a b Brooks, Brian (December 24, 2017). "'The Post' Scoops Into Top Ten In Best 3-Day Averages of 2017; Holdovers Solid – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on December 25, 2017. Retrieved December 24, 2017.
  121. ^ a b Brooks, Brian (January 14, 2018). "Golden Globes Winners 'Three Billboards' & 'Lady Bird' Cash In; 'Phantom Thread' Expands Solid – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 14, 2018. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  122. ^ a b c Brooks, Brian (January 21, 2018). "'Darkest Hour' Tops $41M, 'The Shape of Water' Crosses $30M, 'Call Me By Your Name' Expands – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 22, 2018. Retrieved January 21, 2018.
  123. ^ a b Brueggemann, Tom (January 21, 2018). "With Oscar Nominations Ahead, Specialized Releases Hold Their Breath at the Box Office". IndieWire. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 21, 2018.
  124. ^ a b Brooks, Brian (March 4, 2018). "Oscar Hopefuls Cross Thresholds: 'Shape Of Water' At $57M, 'Darkest Hour' At $55M, 'Three Billboards' At $52M, 'Lady Bird' At $48M — Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on April 24, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  125. ^ "Chiamami col tuo Nome" [Call Me by Your Name] (in Italian). Warner Bros. Entertainment Italia. Archived from the original on February 24, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  126. ^ Vivarelli, Nick (January 24, 2018). "Luca Guadagnino, Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer Talk Oscar Noms in Italy". Variety. Rome, Italy. Archived from the original on January 24, 2018. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  127. ^ a b "Il film di Luca Guadagnino il 29 gennaio al Multisala" [The film by Luca Guadagnino on January 29 at the Multisala]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published January 19, 2018). January 18, 2018. Archived from the original on January 26, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  128. ^ "Guadagnino, il 27 è la serata cremasca" [The film by Luca Guadagnino on January 29 at the Multisala]. La Provincia di Cremona (in Italian). Crema: Soc. Editoriale Cremonese S.P.A (published January 10, 2018). January 9, 2018. Archived from the original on January 10, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  129. ^ Read, Bridget (January 31, 2018). "Watch Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer Dance in the Streets Where Call Me by Your Name Was Filmed With Fans". Vogue. Archived from the original on April 7, 2018. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  130. ^ Orozco, Beatriz (January 18, 2018). "'Me Chame Pelo Seu Nome', o filme para o qual o Oscar não está preparado" [Check out the mesmerizing trailer of Call Me by Your Name]. El País (in Portuguese). Ediciones El País, S.L. Archived from the original on January 30, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  131. ^ Martínez, Edouard (November 28, 2017). "Découvrez la bande-annonce envoûtante de Call Me by Your Name" [Check out the mesmerizing trailer of Call Me by Your Name]. Premiere (in French). Hildegarde. Archived from the original on January 1, 2018. Retrieved November 28, 2017.
  132. ^ "Oscar-nominated 'Call Me By Your Name' Has Been Banned In Tunisia". Attitude. Stream Publishing. March 2, 2018. Archived from the original on March 4, 2018. Retrieved March 2, 2018.
  133. ^ "Tunisia bans Oscar-nominated 'gay' film". Al-Araby Al-Jadeed. March 1, 2018. Archived from the original on March 4, 2018. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  134. ^ Murray, Sean (June 2, 2018). "How a bittersweet coming-of-age love story became the Light House's longest running film ever". The Journal. Archived from the original on June 14, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  135. ^ "Watch 'Call Me By Your Name' with a live orchestra". Manila: CNN Philippines. July 19, 2018. Archived from the original on July 28, 2018. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  136. ^ "Gay Romantic Drama Call Me By Your Name Gets First Official Poster". Attitude. Stream Publishing. July 28, 2017. Archived from the original on September 3, 2018. Retrieved July 28, 2017.
  137. ^ Buchanan, Kyle (August 1, 2017). "Watch the Call Me by Your Name Trailer". Vulture. Archived from the original on August 1, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  138. ^ Nolfi, Joey (August 1, 2017). "Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet spark passion in stunning Call Me by Your Name trailer". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on August 1, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  139. ^ McAdams, Eric (October 11, 2017). "Watch Armie Hammer Dance in New Clip From 'Call Me By Your Name'". Paste. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  140. ^ Lang, Cady (October 13, 2017). "Be Soothed By the Armie Hammer Viral Dance Bringing Delight to the Masses". Time. Archived from the original on October 16, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  141. ^ Shraf, Zack (October 12, 2017). "Armie Hammer Will Dance to Any Song in the 'Call Me By Your Name' Meme of Our Dreams — Watch". IndieWire. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  142. ^ Munzenrieder, Kyle (October 12, 2017). "Armie Hammer's Call Me By Your Name Dance Scene Has Been Meme'd". W. Archived from the original on October 17, 2017. Retrieved October 17, 2017.
  143. ^ Caulfield, Keith (December 7, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Spurs Biggest Streaming Week Ever for The Psychedelic Furs' 'Love My Way'". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 11, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  144. ^ Mikel, Ryan (November 7, 2017). "Sony Pictures Straight Washes Call Me By Your Name". Out. Archived from the original on November 8, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  145. ^ Megarry, Daniel (November 8, 2017). "Sony slammed for 'straight-washing' gay romance Call Me By Your Name". Gay Times. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  146. ^ Lee, Benjamin (November 8, 2017). "Call me by the wrong name: how studios are still trying to straight-wash gay films". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 17, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  147. ^ Wheeler, André-Naquian (March 20, 2018). "Check Out These New 'Call Me By Your Name' Set Photos". i-D. Archived from the original on July 15, 2018. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  148. ^ Lanigan, Roisin (March 17, 2018). "The Korean Promo Pics For 'Call Me By Your Name' Transform It Into An Even More Beautiful Love Story". i-D. Archived from the original on April 18, 2018. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  149. ^ Chmielewski, Dawn C. (December 28, 2017). "'I, Tonya', 'Lady Bird', 'Call Me By Your Name' Awards Screeners Leak Online". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on May 18, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2017.
  150. ^ Spangler, Todd (December 27, 2017). "'Lady Bird,' 'Call Me by Your Name,' 'I, Tonya' Screener Copies Leaked to Piracy Networks". Variety. Archived from the original on April 1, 2018. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  151. ^ Shraf, Zack (December 28, 2017). "Hackers Leak 'Lady Bird,' 'Call Me by Your Name,' and More Online, But Still Encourage You to See Them in Theaters". IndieWire. Archived from the original on May 11, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2017.
  152. ^ a b Smith, Nigel (January 29, 2018). "Exclusive: Timothée Chalamet on Seducing Armie Hammer with 'Piano Playing' in Call Me By Your Name". People. Archived from the original on January 29, 2018. Retrieved January 29, 2018.
  153. ^ Chitwood, Adam (March 13, 2018). "Origins of 'Call Me by Your Name' Revealed in New Blu-ray Clip". Collider. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  154. ^ a b c d "Call Me by Your Name (2017)". The Numbers. Archived from the original on June 14, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  155. ^ "Official DVD Chart Top 100 (11 March 2018 – 17 March 2018)". The Official UK Charts Company. March 11, 2018. Archived from the original on April 4, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  156. ^ "Official Blu-Ray Chart Top 100 (11 March 2018 – 17 March 2018)". The Official UK Charts Company. March 11, 2018. Archived from the original on April 4, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  157. ^ "Box Office Performance for Sony Pictures Classics in 2017". The Numbers. Archived from the original on January 22, 2018. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  158. ^ Brooks, Brian (November 22, 2017). "'Darkest Hour', 'Call Me By Your Name', 'Man Who Invented Christmas' Usher Holiday – Specialty B.O. Preview". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 22, 2017. Retrieved November 22, 2017.
  159. ^ a b Brooks, Brian (November 26, 2017). "'Call Me By Your Name' Scores Year's Best Average Opener At $101K; 'Darkest Hour' Has Robust Start – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 26, 2017. Retrieved November 26, 2017.
  160. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (November 26, 2017). "Thanksgiving B.O. At $268M, +3% Over 2016 Spurred By 'Coco' & Holdovers". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 26, 2017. Retrieved November 26, 2017.
  161. ^ McClintock, Pamela (November 26, 2017). "Thanksgiving Box Office: 'Coco' Gobbles Up 'Justice League' With $71.2M". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 26, 2017. Retrieved November 26, 2017.
  162. ^ Brueggemann, Tom (November 26, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' Is Best Opener of 2017; 'Darkest Hour' Launches Well". IndieWire. Archived from the original on December 7, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  163. ^ McClintock, Pamela (December 3, 2017). "Weekend Box Office: 'Coco' Stays No. 1 With $26.1M; 'The Disaster Artist' Impresses". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on December 3, 2017. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  164. ^ Brueggemann, Tom (December 3, 2017). "Record Opener 'Disaster Artist' and 'The Shape of Water' Lead Specialty Box Office Surge". IndieWire. Archived from the original on December 4, 2017. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  165. ^ Hayes, Dade (December 3, 2017). "Guillermo del Toro's 'The Shape of Water' Bows with 4th Best PTA of 2017; 'The Disaster Artist' Sizzles: Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on December 4, 2017. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  166. ^ Coyle, Jack (December 3, 2017). "Coco Tops Box Office for 2nd Week with $26.1M". Time. Archived from the original on December 4, 2017. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  167. ^ Brooks, Brian (December 3, 2017). "'I, Tonya' Blades To Robust Bow; 'The Shape Of Water' & 'Call Me By Your Name' Expand Solidly – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on December 10, 2017. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  168. ^ Brooks, Brian (January 7, 2018). "'I, Tonya' Expands Strong, 'Call Me By Your Name' Crosses $6M As Golden Globe Noms Score – Specialty Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 7, 2018. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  169. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (January 28, 2018). "Fox Controls Close To 40% Of Weekend B.O. Led By 'Maze Runner' & Oscar Holdovers; 'Hostiles' Gallops Past $10M". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 27, 2018. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  170. ^ Brueggemann, Tom (January 28, 2018). "'The Shape of Water' Gets Oscar Boost as 'Hostiles' Lures Crowds". IndieWire. Archived from the original on January 28, 2018. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  171. ^ "2017 Academy Award Nominations and Winner for Best Picture". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on February 19, 2018. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  172. ^ Katz, Brandon (January 25, 2018). "'Call Me by Your Name' Sequel Details Revealed". The New York Observer. Archived from the original on February 14, 2018. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  173. ^ Brueggemann, Tom (January 30, 2018). "'Call Me by Your Name' Box Office Is Lagging, But Sony Pictures Classics Isn't to Blame". IndieWire. Archived from the original on June 24, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  174. ^ Brooks, Brian (March 11, 2018). "'The Death of Stalin' Has Best Specialty Debut of 2018; 'The Shape of Water' Crosses $61M Post-Oscar — Update". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on May 2, 2018. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  175. ^ Chirichelli, Andrea (January 29, 2018). "'Chiamami Col Tuo Nome' Ottiene La Miglior Media Sala Del Weekend" ['Call Me by Your Name' Gets The Best Average Room Of Weekend]. Mymovies (in Italian). Archived from the original on March 15, 2018. Retrieved January 29, 2018.
  176. ^ Chirichelli, Andrea (February 7, 2018). "'Chiamami Col Tuo Nome' Punta Ai 2 Milioni Di Euro" ['Call Me by Your Name' Points To 2 Million Euro]. Mymovies (in Italian). Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  177. ^ Chirichelli, Andrea (March 13, 2018). "'Chiamami Col Tuo Nome' Rientra in Top Ten" ['Call Me by Your Name' Re-enters in Top Ten]. Mymovies (in Italian). Archived from the original on March 15, 2018. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  178. ^ Champalaune, Mathieu (March 1, 2018). "Box office : Malgré la déferlante "Ch'tite famille", "Call Me By Your Name" et "Les Garçons sauvages" séduisent le public" [Box office: In spite of the breaking 'Ch'tite family', 'Call Me by Your Name' and 'The wild Boys' seduce the public]. Les Inrockuptibles. Archived from the original on March 17, 2018. Retrieved March 1, 2018.
  179. ^ Champalaune, Mathieu (March 9, 2018). "Box office : "Mme Mills" en tête, Isabelle Huppert omniprésente" [Box office: 'Mrs. Mills' in the lead, Isabelle Huppert ubiquitous]. Les Inrockuptibles. Archived from the original on March 17, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  180. ^ Champalaune, Mathieu (March 23, 2018). "Box-office: "Pacific Rim Uprising" domine mollement, "Mektoub My Love" à la peine" [Box office: "Pacific Rim Uprising" dominates softly, "Mektoub My Love" to the trouble]. Les Inrockuptibles. Archived from the original on June 25, 2018. Retrieved March 23, 2018.
  181. ^ Sandwell, Ian (October 30, 2017). "UK box office: 'Thor: Ragnarok' scores biggest non-Bond October debut". Screendaily. Archived from the original on October 30, 2017. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
  182. ^ Gant, Charles (October 30, 2017). "Thor: Ragnarok hammers the opposition at the UK box office". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 1, 2017. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
  183. ^ Sandwell, Ian (November 6, 2017). "UK box office: 'Murder On The Orient Express' derails 'Thor: Ragnarok'". Screendaily. Archived from the original on November 6, 2017. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  184. ^ Sandwell, Ian (November 13, 2017). "UK box office: 'Paddington 2' scores record-breaking bow". Screendaily. Archived from the original on November 21, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  185. ^ Gant, Charles (November 14, 2017). "Paddington 2 makes marmalade of the UK box office competition". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 14, 2017. Retrieved November 14, 2017.
  186. ^ Buchanan, Kyle (January 23, 2017). "Why Sundance Fell in Love With the Gay Romance Call Me by Your Name". Vulture. Archived from the original on August 2, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  187. ^ Marotta, Jenna (November 17, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name': Timothée Chalamet is Learning How to Be a Man, Onscreen and Off". IndieWire. Archived from the original on November 20, 2017. Retrieved November 17, 2017.
  188. ^ "Call Me by Your Name (2017)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Archived from the original on September 29, 2018. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  189. ^ "Golden Tomato Awards: Best-reviewed Movies 2017 > Limited Releases". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. January 4, 2018. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved January 4, 2018.
  190. ^ "Golden Tomato Awards: Best-reviewed Romance Movies 2017". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. January 4, 2018. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved January 4, 2018.
  191. ^ "Call Me By Your Name (2017)". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017. Retrieved January 4, 2018.
  192. ^ Dietz, Jason (January 4, 2018). "Best Movies of 2017". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on January 7, 2018. Retrieved January 4, 2018.
  193. ^ Hoeij, Boyd van (January 23, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name': Film Review | Sundance 2017". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 24, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  194. ^ Ehrlich, David (January 23, 2017). "'Call Me By Your Name' Review: Luca Guadagnino Delivers A Queer Masterpiece — Sundance 2017". IndieWire. Archived from the original on January 24, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  195. ^ Adams, Sam (January 25, 2017). "Film review: Call Me By Your Name will make you swoon". BBC. Archived from the original on January 25, 2017. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  196. ^ Burr, Ty (December 20, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' is full of light and landscape and unstoppable beauty". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on December 27, 2017. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  197. ^ Morgan, David (October 3, 2017). "Review: Armie Hammer in the coming-of-age film "Call Me By Your Name"". CBS. Archived from the original on October 8, 2017. Retrieved October 3, 2017.
  198. ^ Lawson, Richard (January 23, 2017). "The Gorgeous Call Me by Your Name Makes Sundance Swoon". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on November 26, 2017. Retrieved October 3, 2017.
  199. ^ Phillips, Michael (December 13, 2017). "'Call Me by Your Name' review: At long last, first love". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on February 9, 2018. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  200. ^ N.E.G. (September 8, 2017). ""Call Me By Your Name" is a work of beauty". The Economist. Archived from the original on September 12, 2017. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  201. ^ Taylor, Kate (September 9, 2017). "The Globe's Guide to TIFF 2017 Movies". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on November 26, 2017. Retrieved January 17, 2017.
  202. ^ Eisner, Ken (December 13, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name suffers from an excess of beauty". The Georgia Straight. Archived from the original on February 15, 2018. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  203. ^ Turner, Kyle (October 4, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name: 2017 New York Film Festival Review". Paste. Archived from the original on February 16, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  204. ^ White, Armond (November 30, 2017). "Call Me by Your Name's Sex Lives of the Rich and Immodest". Out. Archived from the original on March 20, 2018. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  205. ^ Thompson, Luke Y. (December 31, 2017). "The Most Overrated Films Of 2017". Forbes. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  206. ^ "American Film Institute Announces AFI Awards 2017 Official Selections" (Press release). Los Angeles, CA: American Film Institute. December 7, 2017. Archived from the original on December 8, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  207. ^ "National Board Of Review Announces 2017 Award Winners" (Press release). New York, NY: National Board of Review. November 28, 2017. Archived from the original on November 29, 2017. Retrieved November 28, 2017.
  208. ^ Coggan, Devan (January 23, 2018). "Oscar nominations 2018: See the full list". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  209. ^ Chow, Andrew R. (March 4, 2018). "Oscars 2018: The Winners". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 5, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  210. ^ Olsen, Mark (March 4, 2018). "James Ivory becomes Oscar's oldest winner with 'Call Me by Your Name'". The Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 5, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  211. ^ Ritman, Alex (January 8, 2018). "BAFTA Awards: 'Shape of Water,' 'Three Billboards,' 'Darkest Hour' Lead Pack of Nominations". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 9, 2018. Retrieved January 8, 2018.
  212. ^ "Nominations List for the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2018 (Plain Text)" (Press release). British Academy Film Award. January 9, 2018. Archived from the original on January 9, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  213. ^ Berg, Madeline (January 7, 2018). "Golden Globes 2018: The Full List Of Winners". Forbes. Archived from the original on January 8, 2018. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  214. ^ "'The Shape Of Water' Named Best Picture, Takes Four Awards At 23rd Annual Critics' Choice Awards" (Press release). Los Angeles, CA: Broadcast Film Critics Association/Broadcast Television Journalists Association. January 11, 2018. Archived from the original on January 12, 2018. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  215. ^ "33rd Film Independent Spirits Nominations Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Los Angeles: Independent Spirit Awards. November 21, 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 7, 2017. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  216. ^ "2018 Film Independent Spirit Awards Winners Announced" (Press release). Los Angeles: Independent Spirit Awards. March 3, 2018. Archived from the original on March 4, 2018. Retrieved March 3, 2018.
  217. ^ Rubin, Rebecca (December 13, 2017). "SAG Award Nominations: Complete List". Variety. Archived from the original on January 24, 2018. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  218. ^ "Ava DuVernay, Samira Wiley, 'Call Me by Your Name' Honored at GLAAD Media Awards". Variety. May 5, 2018. Archived from the original on May 6, 2018. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  219. ^ Turrini, Davide (May 30, 2018). "Nastri d'Argento 2018, le nomination – la sfida è tra Loro, Ammore e malavita, Dogman e Napoli velata" [Nastri d'Argento 2018, the nominations - the challenge is between Loro, Ammore and malavita, Dogman and Napoli veiled]. Il Fatto Quotidiano (in Italian). Archived from the original on June 2, 2018. Retrieved May 30, 2018.
  220. ^ Catena, Testo Antonella (June 7, 2018). "Ciak d'Oro 2018: Vincono i Manetti Bros, Luca Guadagnino, Claudia Gerini, Ligabue" [Ciak d'Oro 2018: Manetti Bros, Luca Guadagnino, Claudia Gerini, Ligabue win]. Amica (in Italian). Archived from the original on June 8, 2018. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  221. ^ Gettell, Oliver (November 27, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name takes top prize at 2017 Gotham Awards". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 7, 2017. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  222. ^ "2017 Honorees". Hollywood Film Awards. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  223. ^ Aftab, Kaleem (October 13, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino plots 'Call Me By Your Name' sequel (exclusive)". Screendaily. Archived from the original on October 13, 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  224. ^ Harris, Hunter (October 16, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino Is Planning Call Me by Your Name Sequels, Before Sunrise Style". Vulture. Archived from the original on October 16, 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  225. ^ Desta, Yohana (October 16, 2017). "Call Me By Your Name's Director Would Like to Do a Sequel, Please". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on October 16, 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  226. ^ Shraf, Zack (October 16, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino Planning 'Call Me By Your Name' Sequel For 2020". IndieWire. Archived from the original on October 16, 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  227. ^ Friend, David (December 12, 2017). "Reflections on 'Call Me By Your Name' spur Armie Hammer to consider a sequel". Times Colonist. The Canadian Press. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved December 12, 2017.
  228. ^ Mumford, Gwilym (December 22, 2017). "Luca Guadagnino on Call Me By Your Name: 'It's a step inside my teenage dreams'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  229. ^ Wakeman, Gregory (December 18, 2017). "Will Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet return for a 'Call Me By Your Name' sequel?". Metro New York. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  230. ^ Malkin, Marc (January 25, 2018). "'Call Me by Your Name' Director Reveals Details of the Planned Sequel". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 25, 2018. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  231. ^ a b Jensen, Erin (March 4, 2018). "'Call Me by Your Name' director Luca Guadagnino confirms film's sequel, details plot". USA Today. Archived from the original on May 24, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  232. ^ Kohn, Eric (March 9, 2018). "Armie Hammer Confirms He's Been Pitched the 'Call Me By Your Name' Sequel: 'We're All Gung-Ho About It'". IndieWire. Archived from the original on May 10, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  233. ^ Kembrey, Melanie (April 29, 2018). "Call Me By Your Name writer Andre Aciman on the wine of life". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on July 15, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2018.
  234. ^ Blyth, Antonia (July 12, 2018). "'Call Me By Your Name': Michael Stuhlbarg Says Luca Guadagnino Is 'Serious' About Sequel". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on July 13, 2018. Retrieved July 12, 2018.
  235. ^ Malkin, Marc (September 8, 2018). "Armie Hammer: 'Call Me by Your Name' Sequel 'Will Happen'". Variety. Archived from the original on September 9, 2018. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  236. ^ Sansky, Sam (October 5, 2018). "Timothee Chalamet on a Call Me By Your Name Sequel: 'Armie and I Are 1000% In'". Time. Archived from the original on October 5, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  237. ^ Heller, Nathan (October 8, 2018). "Luca Guadagnino's Cinema of Desire – Mind and Body". The New Yorker (published October 15, 2018). Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2018.

External links[edit]