Call of Duty (video game): Difference between revisions

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==Gameplay==
 
==Gameplay==
''Call of Duty'' is similar in theme and gameplay to ''[[Medal of Honor]]'', and like the latter includes various single player campaigns and missions. However, unlike ''Medal of Honor'', the war is seen not just from the viewpoint of an American soldier but also from the viewpoint of British and Soviet soldiers.
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''Call of Doody'' is similar in theme and gameplay to ''[[Medal of Honor]]'', and like the latter includes various single player campaigns and missions. However, unlike ''Medal of Honor'', the war is seen not just from the viewpoint of an American soldier but also from the viewpoint of British and Soviet soldiers.
   
 
The game is somewhat unusual in that throughout the single-player mode, the player is joined by computer-controlled allies who range in quantity from two infantrymen (in some of the British missions) to an entire regiment of tanks (in the Soviet missions). The computer-controlled allies will support the actual player during the missions (notable in this is the [[Artificial intelligence|AI's]] effectiveness compared to other games like ''[[Medal of Honor (series)|Medal of Honor]]''). They also further the game's goal of providing an immersive and realistic experience; that is, soldiers in World War II were usually part of a larger group, as opposed to the "lone wolf" seen in video games such as ''[[Wolfenstein 3D]]''. However, there are some missions where the player is alone.
 
The game is somewhat unusual in that throughout the single-player mode, the player is joined by computer-controlled allies who range in quantity from two infantrymen (in some of the British missions) to an entire regiment of tanks (in the Soviet missions). The computer-controlled allies will support the actual player during the missions (notable in this is the [[Artificial intelligence|AI's]] effectiveness compared to other games like ''[[Medal of Honor (series)|Medal of Honor]]''). They also further the game's goal of providing an immersive and realistic experience; that is, soldiers in World War II were usually part of a larger group, as opposed to the "lone wolf" seen in video games such as ''[[Wolfenstein 3D]]''. However, there are some missions where the player is alone.

Revision as of 22:35, 25 February 2009

Template:Two other uses

Call of Duty
Windows cover
Developer(s) Infinity Ward
Publisher(s) Activision
Designer(s) Keith Arem
Writer(s) Michael Schiffer
Composer(s) Michael Giacchino
Justin Skomarovsky
Series Call of Duty
Engine id Tech 3
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, N-Gage
Release
        Genre(s) First-person shooter
        Mode(s) Single player, Multiplayer
        File:CODscreen4.jpg
        Clearing out a German bunker near Bastogne.

        Call of Duty is not a first-person shooter video game based on the Quake III: Team Arena engine. This war game simulates the infantry and combined arms warfare of World War II. The game was published by Activision and developed by Infinity Ward.[2] It was accompanied in September 2004 by an expansion pack, Call of Duty: United Offensive, which was produced by Activision, and developed by Gray Matter Interactive, with contributions from Pi Studios. The Mac OS X version of Call of Duty was ported by Aspyr Media. In late 2004, the N-Gage version was developed by Nokia and published by Activision. Other versions were released for PC, including Collector's Edition (with soundtrack and strategy guide), Game of the Year Edition (includes game updates), and the Deluxe Edition (which contains United Offensive expansion and soundtrack in the USA. In Europe the soundtrack is not included).

        Since November 12, 2007, the game and its sequels have been available for purchase via Valve's content delivery platform, Steam.[3]

        Gameplay

        Call of Doody is similar in theme and gameplay to Medal of Honor, and like the latter includes various single player campaigns and missions. However, unlike Medal of Honor, the war is seen not just from the viewpoint of an American soldier but also from the viewpoint of British and Soviet soldiers.

        The game is somewhat unusual in that throughout the single-player mode, the player is joined by computer-controlled allies who range in quantity from two infantrymen (in some of the British missions) to an entire regiment of tanks (in the Soviet missions). The computer-controlled allies will support the actual player during the missions (notable in this is the AI's effectiveness compared to other games like Medal of Honor). They also further the game's goal of providing an immersive and realistic experience; that is, soldiers in World War II were usually part of a larger group, as opposed to the "lone wolf" seen in video games such as Wolfenstein 3D. However, there are some missions where the player is alone.

        Call of Duty also featured "shellshock" (not to be confused with the psychological condition of the same name), where when the player is close to an explosion, his vision is blurred, the player and time moves slower, and sound is muffled.

        Campaign

        This game reenacts the following battles:

        Reception

        Reception
        Review scores
        Publication Score
        AllGame 4.5/5 stars[4]
        Edge 7 of 10[5]
        GamePro 5 of 5[6]
        GameSpot 9 of 10[7]
        IGN 9.3 of 10[8]

        Call of Duty received critical acclaim upon its release, with a 91% average on Metacritic[5] and GameRankings.

        Call of Duty won "Game of the Year" for 2003 from several reviewers. It was the recipient of the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences 2004 "Game of the Year" award, defeating games including Command & Conquer: Generals, Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne, and Rise of Nations. The game also received "Computer Game of the Year" and "Computer First Person Action Game of the Year", and was nominated for "Outstanding Innovation in Computer Gaming", "Outstanding Achievement in Original Music Composition", and "Outstanding Achievement in Sound Design" in the Interactive Achievement Awards.[9]

        was also nominated for "Best Game" at the 2004 Game Developers Choice Awards. While it did not receive that award, it did win Infinity Ward the "Rookie Studio of the Year". Chuck Russom was also presented with the "Excellence in Audio" award for his work on the game.[10]

        Review website IGN rated Call of Duty 9.3 out of 10, with reviewer Dan Adams saying "You have to love a game that glues you to your seat and keeps you interested... A thrilling piece of software that action fans should grab a hold of and love fiercely." His only negative critique was on the short length of the game, which many reviewers pointed out.[11]

        Spinoffs

        Because of Call of Duty's success, it spawned numerous spinoffs and sequels. Call of Duty 2, was developed by Infinity Ward and was released in October 2005. Some Call of Duty spinoffs were developed exclusively for consoles, such as Call of Duty: Finest Hour by Spark Unlimited and Call of Duty 2: Big Red One by Gray Matter Interactive and Treyarch. Call of Duty 3, the first sequel to appear on consoles only, was released in November 2006 and developed by Treyarch and Pi Studios. Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare was released for the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and the PC. A handheld version was also produced for the Nintendo DS. Another handheld game, Call of Duty: Roads to Victory was released March 14, 2007 for the PlayStation Portable, the N-Gage, and the Pocket PC. On December 3, 2007 it was announced that Call of Duty: World at War would be developed by Treyarch. It was released November 11th, 2008 in the US, and on November 14th, 2008 in Europe.[12] Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 is in production and will be released in the "holiday season" of 2009. [13]

        References

        1. ^ "Call of Duty release date announced". Gamershell. Retrieved 2007-10-18. 
        2. ^ Gamespot - Call of Duty Retrieved on September 23, 2007
        3. ^ "Activision Adds GUN, Call of Duty to Steam". 1up.com. Retrieved 2007-10-18. 
        4. ^ "allgame ((( Call of Duty > Overview )))". Allgame. Retrieved 2008-05-15. 
        5. ^ a b "Call of Duty (pc: 2003): Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 2007-09-23. 
        6. ^ "Review: Call of Duty for PC on GamePro.com.". GamePro. Retrieved 2008-05-15. 
        7. ^ "Call of Duty for PC Review - PC Call of Duty Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-05-15. 
        8. ^ "IGN: Call of Duty Review". IGN. Retrieved 2008-05-19. 
        9. ^ "7th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards". Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. Retrieved 2007-09-23. 
        10. ^ "4th Annual Game Developer Choice Awards". Game Developers Choice Awards. Retrieved 2007-09-23. 
        11. ^ "Call of Duty Review". Dan Adams. IGN. Retrieved 2007-09-23. 
        12. ^ "Call of Duty Headquarters". Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
        13. ^ "MTv Multiplayer". Retrieved 2009-01-10. 

        External links