Calotes maria

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Calotes maria
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Iguania
Family: Agamidae
Subfamily: Draconinae
Genus: Calotes
Species: C. maria
Binomial name
Calotes maria
Gray, 1845[1]

Calotes maria, called commonly the Khasi Hills forest lizard, is a species of agamid lizard. The species is found in India (Khasi Hills in Assam & Mizoram),[2] and may also be found areas of Bangladesh, adjacent to Assam and Mizoram provinces of India.

Etymology[edit]

The specific name, maria, may be in honor of English conchologist Maria Emma Gray, the wife of John Edward Gray, the describer of this species.[3]

Morphology[edit]

Physical Structure: Two parallel rows of compressed scales on the head just above tympanum. Has extra flap of skin on the side of the abdomen.

Color Pattern: Body color yellowish green with blue patterns on the sides. Iris is orange-yellow with black pupil. Tail white and having brown patterns on it.

Length: Maximum: ?, Common: 11 cm. (Snout to vent 6 cm.).

Maximum published weight: ? g.

Distribution[edit]

India (Khasi Hills in Assam & Mizoram) and Possibly in Bangladesh (Chittagong Hill-tracts & Sylhet Division).

Vernacular names[edit]

Bengali: খাসি রক্তচোষা, খাসিয়া গিরিগিটি (Khasia girigiti) (proposed) ।

English: Khasi Hills forest lizard and Khasi Hills bloodsucker.

Hindi, Assamese & Mizo: ?

Habitat[edit]

Terrestrial and arboreal; diurnal; found in many types of forested land, tree trunks, branches and green leaves. Prefers hilly regions and dense forest.

Diet[edit]

Feeds on crickets, grasshoppers, moths and other insects.

Reproduction[edit]

Oviparous; more or less like Calotes versicolor. About 10-20 eggs laid by female and buried in moist soil. Incubation period about 6-7 weeks.[4]

Uses[edit]

No known practical uses. Plays rôle in ecosystem by eating various types of insects and otherwise.

Threat to humans[edit]

Non-venomous and completely harmless to humans.

IUCN threat status[edit]

Not Evaluated (NE).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gray JE. 1845. Catalogue of the Specimens of Lizards in the Collection of the British Museum. London: Trustees of the British Museum. (Edward Newman, printer). xxvii + 289 pp. (Calotes maria, new species, p. 243).
  2. ^ Calotes maria at the Reptarium.cz Reptile Database. Accessed 22 July 2014.
  3. ^ Beolens B, Watkins M, Grayson M. 2011. The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. xiii + 296 pp. ISBN 978-1-4214-0135-5. (Calotes maria, p. 168).
  4. ^ http://faunaofindia.nic.in/PDFVolumes/hpg/007/index.pdf

Further reading[edit]

  • Boulenger GA. 1885. Catalogue of the Lizards in the British Museum (Natural History). Second Edition. Volume I. ... Agamidæ. London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History). (Taylor and Francis, printers). xii + 436 pp. + Plates I-XXXII. (Calotes maria, pp. 322–323).
  • Boulenger GA. 1890. The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma. Reptilia and Batrachia. London: Secretary of State for India in Council. (Taylor and Francis, printers). xviii + 541 pp. (Calotes maria, pp. 136–137).
  • Günther ACLG. 1864. The Reptiles of British India. London: The Ray Society. (Taylor and Francis, printers). xxvii + 452 pp. + Plates I-XXVI. (Calotes maria, pp. 144–145).
  • Smith MA. 1935. The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma. Reptilia and Amphibia. Vol. II.—Sauria. London: Secretary of State for India in Council. (Taylor and Francis, printers). xiii + 440 pp. + Plate I + 2 maps. (Calotes maria, pp. 193–194).