Cals cabinet

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Cals cabinet
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
50th cabinet of the Netherlands
Kabinet 1965-04-14 - SFA003001471.jpg ZetelsCals.svg
The installation of the Cals cabinet on 14 April 1965
Date formed14 April 1965 (1965-04-14)
Date dissolved22 November 1966 (1966-11-22)
(Demissionary from 14 October 1966 (1966-10-14))
People and organisations
Head of stateQueen Juliana
Head of governmentJo Cals
Deputy head of governmentAnne Vondeling
Barend Biesheuvel
No. of ministers14
Total no. of ministers15
Member partyCatholic People's Party
(KVP)
Labour Party
(PvdA)
Anti-Revolutionary Party
(ARP)
Status in legislatureCentre-left Majority government
Opposition partyPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Opposition leaderMolly Geertsema
(1965–1966)
Edzo Toxopeus
(1966)
History
Legislature term(s)1963–1967
Incoming formation1965 formation
Outgoing formation1966 formation
PredecessorMarijnen cabinet
SuccessorZijlstra cabinet
Azure, billetty Or a lion with a coronet Or armed and langued Gules holding in his dexter paw a sword Argent hilted Or and in the sinister paw seven arrows Argent pointed and bound together Or. [The seven arrows stand for the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht.] The shield is crowned with the (Dutch) royal crown and supported by two lions Or armed and langued gules. They stand on a scroll Azure with the text (Or) "Je Maintiendrai" (French for "I will maintain".)
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The Cals cabinet was the cabinet of the Netherlands from 14 April 1965 until 22 November 1966. The cabinet was formed by the political parties Catholic People's Party (KVP), Labour Party (PvdA) and the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) after the resignation of the Marijnen cabinet on 27 February 1965. The centre-left cabinet was a majority cabinet in the House of Representatives. Jo Cals of the Catholic People's Party was Prime Minister, with Anne Vondeling the Leader of the Labour Party and Barend Biesheuvel the Leader of the Anti-Revolutionary Party serving as Deputy Prime Ministers.[1]

Formation[edit]

After the fall of the Marijnen cabinet, the confessional parties did not want snap elections because those could centre on the introduction of commercial television, the issue that led to the fall of the former cabinet. So a new cabinet was formed on the basis of the existing situation. A continuation of the Marijnen cabinet was considered to have too narrow a basis, so PvdA was asked to join in. As a result, CHU stepped out. But previous frictions between PvdA and KVP were overcome because there was a desire to form a cabinet fast, which was indeed done, in just over a month.

Term[edit]

After two decades of economic growth, this cabinet experienced a slight recession. Plans to build sports halls, roads and houses had to be tempered. In Limburg the coal mines were closed and plans were drawn to educate and re-employ the former miners.

There was also social unrest ('the sixties'), which became apparent in the Provo movement, construction worker protests, riots over the marriage of princess Beatrix in Amsterdam and the rise of new parties like Farmers' Party (BP), Pacifist Socialist Party (PSP), Reformed Political League (GPV) and the Democrats 66 (D'66). Especially the last party wanted to change the political order .

On 14 October 1966 Norbert Schmelzer the Leader of the Catholic People's Party and Parliamentary leader of the Catholic People's Party in the House of Representatives proposed a Motion of no confidence against the cabinet and Prime Minister Jo Cals. A shocking and surprised action in Dutch politics, it marked the first time that a motion of no confidence was proposed against a cabinet of the same party. The cabinet resigned that evening.[2][3][4]

Changes[edit]

On 5 February 1966 State Secretary for Defense for Air Force Affairs Jan Borghouts (KVP) died following a debilitating disease at the age of 55. On 22 June 1966 former Chairman of the United Defence Staff lieutenant general Heije Schaper, who until then had been working as Chief Adjutant in extraordinary service to Queen Juliana was installed as his successor.

On 31 August 1966 Minister of the Interior Jan Smallenbroek (ARP) resigned after he was involved in a traffic incident while driving under the influence. Minister of Justice Ivo Samkalden (PvdA) served as acting Minister of the Interior until 5 September 1966 when Koos Verdam (ARP), who until then had been working as a professor of Roman and International Private Law at the VU University Amsterdam was appointed as his successor.

The first meeting of the Cals cabinet on 14 April 1965.

Cabinet Members[edit]

Ministers Title/Ministry Term of office Party
Jo Cals Jo Cals
(1914–1971)
Prime Minister General Affairs 14 April 1965 –
22 November 1966
Catholic People's Party
Anne Vondeling Dr.
Anne Vondeling
(1916–1979)
Deputy Prime Minister /
Minister
Finance 14 April 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Barend Biesheuvel Barend Biesheuvel
(1920–2001)
Deputy Prime Minister /
Minister
Agriculture and
Fisheries
24 July 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Jan Smallenbroek Jan Smallenbroek
(1909–1974)
Minister Interior 14 April 1965 –
31 August 1966
[Res]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Ivo Samkalden Dr.
Ivo Samkalden
(1912–1995)
31 August 1966 –
5 September 1966
[Ad interim]
Labour Party
Koos Verdam Dr.
Koos Verdam
(1915–1998)
5 September 1966 –
5 April 1967
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Joseph Luns Dr.
Joseph Luns
(1911–2002)
Minister Foreign Affairs 13 October 1956 –
6 July 1971
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Ivo Samkalden Dr.
Ivo Samkalden
(1912–1995)
Minister Justice 14 April 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Joop den Uyl Joop den Uyl
(1919–1987)
Minister Economic Affairs 14 April 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Piet de Jong Piet de Jong
(1915–2016)
Minister Defence 24 July 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Gerard Veldkamp Dr.
Gerard Veldkamp
(1921–1990)
Minister Social Affairs and
Health
17 July 1961 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Isaäc Arend Diepenhorst Dr.
Isaäc Arend
Diepenhorst

(1916–2004)
Minister Education and
Sciences
14 April 1965 –
5 April 1967
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Ko Suurhoff Ko Suurhoff
(1905–1967)
Minister Transport and
Water Management
14 April 1965 –
1 May 1966
[Note]
Labour Party
Pieter Bogaers Pieter Bogaers
(1924–2008)
1 May 1966 –
30 June 1966
[Ad interim]
Catholic People's Party
Ko Suurhoff Ko Suurhoff
(1905–1967)
30 June 1966 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Pieter Bogaers Pieter Bogaers
(1924–2008)
Minister Housing and
Spatial Planning
24 July 1963 –
22 November 1966
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Maarten Vrolijk Maarten Vrolijk
(1919–1994)
Minister Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
14 April 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Ministers without portfolio Title/Portfolio/Ministry Term of office Party
Theo Bot Theo Bot
(1911–1984)
Minister Aid to Developing Countries

(within Foreign Affairs)
14 April 1965 –
5 April 1967
Catholic People's Party
Barend Biesheuvel Barend Biesheuvel
(1920–2001)
Minister Suriname and Netherlands
Antilles Affairs

(within Interior)
24 July 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
State Secretaries Title/Portfolio/Ministry Term of office Party
Theo Westerhout Theo Westerhout
(1922–1987)
State Secretary • Central Government Affairs
• Provincial Government Affairs
• Local Government Affairs

(within Interior)
12 July 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Leo de Block Leo de Block
(1904–1988)
State Secretary • European Affairs
• NATO Affairs
• Benelux Affairs
• International Aviation Policy

(within Foreign Affairs)
3 September 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Max van der Stoel Max van der Stoel
(1924–2011)
• United Nations Affairs
• International Cooperation

(within Foreign Affairs)
22 July 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Wiel Hoefnagels Dr.
Wiel Hoefnagels
(1929–1978)
State Secretary • Fiscal Affairs
• Tax and Customs Administration

(within Finance)
31 May 1965 –
22 November 1966
Catholic People's Party
Joop Bakker Joop Bakker
(1921–2003)
State Secretary • Small Business Policy
• Retail Policy
• Competition Policy
• Regional Development

(within Economic Affairs)
3 September 1963 –
22 November 1966
[Retained]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Gerard Peijnenburg Lieutenant
Gerard Peijnenburg
(1919–2000)
State Secretary • Army

(within Defence)
13 May 1965 –
5 April 1967
Independent
Christian Democrat

(Catholic)
Adri van Es Vice admiral
Adri van Es
(1913–1994)
• Navy

(within Defence)
14 August 1963 –
16 September 1972
[Retained]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Jan Borghouts Colonel
Jan Borghouts
(1910–1966)
• Air Force

(within Defence)
12 July 1965 –
5 February 1966
[Died]
Catholic People's Party
Heije Schaper Lieutenant general
Heije Schaper
(1906–1996)
22 June 1966 –
5 April 1967
Independent
Liberal

(Conservative Liberal)
José de Meijer Dr.
José de Meijer
(1915–2000)
State Secretary • Social Security
• Unemployment Affairs
• Occupational Safety
• Social Services
• Poverty Policy
• Public Sector Organisations

(within Social Affairs and
Health)
15 November 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Louis Bartels Dr.
Louis Bartels
(1915–2002)
State Secretary • Elderly Policy
• Disability Affairs
• Veteran Affairs
• Medical Ethics Policy

(within Social Affairs and
Health)
3 September 1963 –
5 April 1967
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Hans Grosheide Hans Grosheide
(born 1930)
State Secretary • Primary Education
• Secondary Education
• Higher Education
• Special Education

(within Education and
Sciences
)
3 September 1963 –
6 July 1971
[Retained]
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Siep Posthumus Siep Posthumus
(1910–1987)
State Secretary • Transport Infrastructure
• Public Transport
• Energy Policy
• Postal Service
• Weather Forecasting Service

(within Transport and
Water Management
)
4 May 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Cees Egas Cees Egas
(1913–2001)
State Secretary • Youth Policy
• Environmental Policy
• Nature Policy
• Media Affairs
• Culture Policy
• Arts Policy
• Recreation Affairs
• Sport

(within Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
)
10 May 1965 –
22 November 1966
Labour Party
Source: (in Dutch) Rijksoverheid.nl
Retained Retained this position from the previous cabinet.
Res Resigned.
Ad interim Ad interim.
Note Medical leave of absence.
Died Died in office.

Living cabinet member[edit]

  • As of 2019, the following cabinet members are still alive:
    • State Secretary

References[edit]

  1. ^ ""Misschien waren we allebei teveel boekhouder'" (in Dutch). NRC Handelsblad. 12 September 1991. Retrieved 1 April 2018.
  2. ^ (in Dutch) De Nacht van Schmelzer, Geschiedenis24, 15 October 2001
  3. ^ (in Dutch) Kabinetscrisis 1966: de Nacht van Schmelzer, Parlement & Politiek, 24 December 2008
  4. ^ (in Dutch) De Nacht van Schmelzer (1966), Histotheek.nl, 9 March 2010

External links[edit]

Official