Cambridge University Law Society

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Cambridge University Law Society
Cambridge University Law Society.png
20130808 Kings College Chapel 01.jpg
TypeStudent-run law society
Established1901 (120 years ago) (1901)
FounderFaculty of Law, University of Cambridge
Academic affiliation
University of Cambridge
PresidentRebecca McNeill
Vice-presidentYasmin Dugdale
Honorary PresidentBrenda Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond[1]
Students2,000 (estd.)
Location,
United Kingdom
CampusDavid Williams Building
Websitewww.culs.org.uk

The Cambridge University Law Society (also known as "CULS" or "LawSoc") is the educational and representative body of undergraduate law students at the University of Cambridge. Founded in 1901, and with an estimated 2,000 active members,[2] it is the largest United Kingdom student-led law society and among the largest student-run law societies in the world.[3][4] It founded the Cambridge Law Journal as a student publication in 1921,[5][6] today the longest-running university law journal in the United Kingdom and the principal publication of the Faculty of Law, Cambridge.

It is known for its Speakers events featuring prominent lawyers, politicians and legal celebrities. It also publishes the Cambridge Law Review and organises the annual University of Cambridge Law Ball, one of the University's most prominent events outside May Week.[7] It is one of the wealthiest societies at the University of Cambridge.[2][8]

History[edit]

CULS was established in January 1901 by the Faculty of Law, Cambridge as an educational body of law students. It had a small membership in its earlier years, and was dormant during World War I. In 1920, it was given increased attention by then Downing Professor of the Laws of England Harold Hazeltine,[5] who delivered its inaugural address. Through the connections of the Faculty, CULS hosted prominent legal figures in the 1920s, including Joseph Henry Beale,[5] Roscoe Pound,[9] Travers Humphreys,[10] and William Buckland.[10] These addresses were academic in nature, and were frequently reproduced in the Cambridge Law Journal. CULS also increased its engagement with other Cambridge University societies, including through debates.[11][12] By 1977, CULS was the third-largest society by memberships in the University of Cambridge.[13]

Structure and organisation[edit]

Membership[edit]

Membership is open to all members of the University of Cambridge. Elected positions are restricted to members of the Society who are undergraduates at the University of Cambridge. The Society is led by an executive committee, which appoints non-executive committees and sub-committees. The President, Vice-President, Treasurer and Secretary are elected officers of the Society, and there are 9 mandatory appointments to the non-Executive Committee.[14]

Law Ball[edit]

Ballet performance at the 2017 Law Ball

The Cambridge University Law Society organises the annual Law Ball, one of the University's most prominent balls outside May Week.[7][15] The location of the ball is traditionally kept secret until the guests arrive. Guests are given a meeting point and subsequently transported to the venue.[15] These balls are partially sponsored by law firms, and tend to be elaborately themed. Past headliners have included Tinchy Stryder,[16] The Hoosiers,[17] and S Club 3.[18]

Per Incuriam Magazine[edit]

The Society's official termly magazine, Per Incuriam, features content by students as well as notable academics and professionals.[19] Notable past contributors include John Laws, Simon Deakin, and David Feldman.

Cambridge Law Journal[edit]

In 1921, the Cambridge University Law Society founded the Cambridge Law Journal as a student publication.[5][6] As it gained recognition for quality,[20] its management was taken over by the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge. Today, the Cambridge Law Journal is the longest-running university law journal in the United Kingdom and the principal publication of the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge. It is edited by Professor John Bell. In 2003, The Cambridge Law Review was founded as a successor student-run academic journal.[21]

Honorary Presidents[edit]

Name From To
Cyril Salmon, Baron Salmon[22] 1975 1991
Peter Oliver, Baron Oliver of Aylmerton[23] 1991 2007
Michael Mustill, Baron Mustill[24] 2007 2015
Brenda Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond[25] 2015 Present

Notable visitors, lecturers and speakers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CULS Lecture: Lady Hale - 'The Life of A Lady Law Lord' - Faculty of Law". www.law.cam.ac.uk.
  2. ^ a b "Careers and Cambridge: Obsession or Anathema?". 3 February 2017.
  3. ^ "Solicitors in Cambridge - Slater and Gordon Lawyers UK". Slater and Gordon Lawyers UK.
  4. ^ "Student Societies - BA Faculty of Law". ba.law.cam.ac.uk.
  5. ^ a b c d "Reports of the University and College Law Societies." The Cambridge Law Journal, vol. 1, no. 1, 1921, pp. 95–106. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/4514852.
  6. ^ a b Library, New York University Law (16 February 2018). "A Catalogue of the Law Collection at New York University: With Selected Annotations". The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. – via Google Books.
  7. ^ a b "Law Society (CULS) [Cambridge University] @ Cambridge University Students' Union". www.cusu.co.uk.
  8. ^ "Which Deadly Sin is your Society?". 10 October 2016.
  9. ^ "Reports of the University and College Law Societies." The Cambridge Law Journal, vol. 1, no. 2, 1922, pp. 219–227. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/4514898.
  10. ^ a b "Reports of the University and College Law Societies." The Cambridge Law Journal, vol. 1, no. 3, 1923, pp. 369–378. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/4514964.
  11. ^ "The Criminal Responsibility of the Alleged Insane." The Cambridge Law Journal, vol. 1, no. 3, 1923, pp. 302–322. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/4514933.
  12. ^ Durley, Lord Wright of (4 December 2014). "Legal Essays and Addresses". Cambridge University Press – via Google Books.
  13. ^ Massey, David (1978). "Cambridge University Law Society, 1977-78". The Cambridge Law Journal. 37 (2): 375–376. JSTOR 4506131.
  14. ^ "Cambridge University Law Society — The UK's Largest Student Law Society" (PDF). Cambridge University Law Society.
  15. ^ a b "CULS Law Ball 2014". Varsity Online. Retrieved 25 November 2020.
  16. ^ "Cambridge University Law Society". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 25 November 2020.
  17. ^ "CULS Annual Ball 2019". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 25 November 2020.
  18. ^ "Cambridge University Law Society". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 25 November 2020.
  19. ^ Jessalyn, Blossom Meghan (20 January 2012). "Per Incuriam". Sess Press – via Google Books.
  20. ^ Miles O. Price, "A Catalogue of the Law Collection at New York University, with Selected Annotations. Julius J. Marke ," The Library Quarterly 24, no. 4 (Oct., 1954): 1158.
  21. ^ https://www.cambridgelawreview.org/about-us/history/[permanent dead link]
  22. ^ Blake, Jonathan (1975). "Cambridge University Law Society". The Cambridge Law Journal. 34 (2): 351–352.}}
  23. ^ Peacock, Lisa (November 1991). "Cambridge University Law Society". Cambridge Law Journal. 50 (3): 580–581 – via HeinOnline.
  24. ^ "Death of the Rt Hon Lord Mustill - Faculty of Law". archive.is. 28 April 2015. Archived from the original on 28 April 2015. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  25. ^ "CULS Lecture: Lady Hale - 'The Life of A Lady Law Lord', Faculty of Law". www.law.cam.ac.uk. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  26. ^ Wilson, Hilary (1973). "The University Law Society". The Cambridge Law Journal. 32 (1): 175–176. ISSN 0008-1973.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g T. P. J. Hill. "Cambridge University Law Society 1985-86." The Cambridge Law Journal, vol. 45, no. 3, 1986, pp. 542–544. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/4506955.
  28. ^ a b c d Jackson, A. P. "Cambridge University Law Society 1979-80." The Cambridge Law Journal, vol. 39, no. 2, 1980, pp. 407–408. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/4506309.