Camden County, New Jersey

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Camden County, New Jersey
Ru-camden-campus.jpg
Campus of Rutgers-Camden
Map of New Jersey highlighting Camden County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
Founded March 13, 1844
Named for Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden
Seat Camden[1]
Largest city Camden (population)
Winslow Township (area)
Area
 • Total 227.293 sq mi (589 km2)
 • Land 221.263 sq mi (573 km2)
 • Water 6.030 sq mi (16 km2), 2.32%
Population
 • (2010) 513,657[2]
 • Density 2,309/sq mi (891.7/km²)
Congressional districts 1st, 2nd
Website www.camdencounty.com

Camden County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. Its county seat is Camden.[1][3] As of the 2010 Census, the population was 513,657,[2][4] having increased by 4,725 (up 0.9%, the third-lowest growth rate in the state) from the 508,932 counted in the 2000 Census,[5] retaining its position as the state's eighth-most populous county.[6][7] As of 2014, Camden County's Census-estimated population was 511,038.[8] The most populous place was Camden, with 77,344 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Winslow Township covered 58.19 square miles (150.7 km2), the largest total area of any municipality.[7]

It was formed on March 13, 1844, from portions of Gloucester County.[9] The county was named for Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden, a British judge, civil libertarian, and defender of the American cause.[10]

The county is part of the Camden, NJ Metropolitan Division of the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD / Delaware Valley Metropolitan Statistical Area.[11][12]

Geography[edit]

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 227.293 square miles (588.69 km2), including 221.263 square miles (573.07 km2) of land (97.3%) and 6.030 square miles (15.62 km2) of water (2.7%).[13]

Located in a coastal / alluvial plain, the county is uniformly flat and low-lying. The highest points are a survey benchmark near the Burlington County line at 219 feet (67 m) above sea level.[14] The low point is sea level, along the Delaware River.

Adjacent counties[edit]

The county borders the following counties:[15]

National protected area[edit]

Climate and weather[edit]

Camden, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3
 
 
40
26
 
 
2.8
 
 
44
28
 
 
3.8
 
 
53
34
 
 
3.6
 
 
64
44
 
 
3.7
 
 
74
54
 
 
3.4
 
 
83
64
 
 
4.4
 
 
87
69
 
 
3.5
 
 
85
68
 
 
3.8
 
 
78
60
 
 
3.2
 
 
67
48
 
 
3
 
 
56
39
 
 
3.6
 
 
45
30
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[16]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Camden have ranged from a low of 26 °F (−3 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −11 °F (−24 °C) was recorded in February 1934 and a record high of 106 °F (41 °C) was recorded in August 1918. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.75 inches (70 mm) in February to 4.35 inches (110 mm) in July.[16]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 25,422
1860 34,457 35.5%
1870 46,193 34.1%
1880 62,942 36.3%
1890 87,687 39.3%
1900 107,643 22.8%
1910 142,029 31.9%
1920 190,508 34.1%
1930 252,312 32.4%
1940 255,727 1.4%
1950 300,743 17.6%
1960 392,035 30.4%
1970 456,291 16.4%
1980 471,650 3.4%
1990 502,824 6.6%
2000 508,932 1.2%
2010 513,657 0.9%
Est. 2014 511,038 [8][17] −0.5%
Historical sources: 1790-1990[18]
1970-2010[7] 2000[5] 2010[2]

While many of its municipalities are working class, Camden County has many contrasts in its demographics. Most of Camden and parts of Lindenwold are considered highly impoverished, while Cherry Hill Township, Voorhees Township, Haddon Heights and Haddonfield have upper-income enclaves.

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 513,657 people, 190,980 households, and 129,866 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,321.5 per square mile (896.3/km2). There were 204,943 housing units at an average density of 926.2 per square mile (357.6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 65.29% (335,389) White, 19.55% (100,441) Black or African American, 0.31% (1,608) Native American, 5.11% (26,257) Asian, 0.03% (165) Pacific Islander, 7.08% (36,354) from other races, and 2.62% (13,443) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 14.24% (73,124) of the population.[2]

There were 190,980 households, of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 16.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.22.[2]

In the county, 24.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 9% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 27.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.9 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males.[2]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[19] there were 508,932 people, 185,744 households, and 129,835 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,289 people per square mile (884/km²). There were 199,679 housing units at an average density of 898 per square mile (347/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 70.88% White American, 18.09% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 3.72% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 5.09% from other races, and 1.93% from two or more races. 9.66% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[5][20] Among those residents listing their ancestry, 20.6% of residents were of Irish, 18.2% Italian, 15.7% German and 8.1% English ancestry according to Census 2000.[20][21]

There were 185,744 households out of which 34.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.23.[5]

In the county the population was spread out with 26.8% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.1 males.[5]

The median income for a household in the county was $48,097, and the median income for a family was $57,429. Males had a median income of $41,609 versus $30,470 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,354. About 8.1% of families and 10.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.5% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.[20][22]

Government[edit]

The county is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections for three-year terms on a staggered basis by the residents of the county, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At a reorganization meeting held in january after each election, the newly constituted Freeholder Board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director[23] As of 2015, Camden County's Freeholders are:[24]

Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County clerk Joseph Ripa,[33] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham,[34] and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones.[24][35] The Camden County Prosecutor Mary Eva Colalillo was appointed by the Governor of New Jersey with the advice and consent of the New Jersey Senate (the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature).[36]

As with most counties in the state, the court system consists of municipal courts for each township, borough and city, as well as a New Jersey Superior Court for the county. The latter handles the more serious criminal and civil cases, while the municipal courts handle traffic and other minor items.

Law enforcement at the county level, in addition to a sheriff, includes the Camden County Police Department and the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. The Camden Police Department and the Camden County Park Police were absorbed into the newly formed Camden County Police Department in 2013.

Two federal Congressional Districts cover the county, including portions of the 1st and 2nd Districts.[37][38] New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[39] New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[40]

The county is part of the 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th Districts in the New Jersey Legislature.[41] The 4th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[42] For the 2014-2015 Session, the 5th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nilsa Cruz-Perez (D, Camden, serving the unexpired term of Donald Norcross until November 2015)[43] and in the General Assembly by Angel Fuentes (D, Camden) and Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (D, Camden).[44] For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[45] For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[46]

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results
Year GOP Dems
2012[47] 30.7% 69,476 68.0% 153,682
2008[48] 32.0% 68,072 66.9% 142,433
2004[49] 36.9% 81,427 62.4% 137,765
2000[50] 31.7% 62,464 64.6% 127,166
1996 27.8% 52,791 60.6% 114,962
1992 31.9% 67,205 49.7% 104,915
1988 52.0% 100,072 47.1% 90,704
1984 54.6% 109,749 44.9% 90,233
1980 47.1% 87,939 42.8% 80,033
1976 42.3% 82,801 55.6% 108,854
1972 58.8% 111,935 39.5% 75,202
1968 41.1% 77,642 46.2% 87,347
1964 32.8% 124,620 67.1% 147,189
1960 45.1% 102,083 54.7% 84,066

Camden County has long been a Democratic stronghold. The county usually votes overwhelmingly Democratic in national, state, and local elections.

As of October 31, 2014, there were a total of 355,107 registered voters in Camden County, of whom 141,869 (40.%) were registered as Democrats, 44,645 (12.6%) were registered as Republicans and 168,287 (47.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 306 voters registered to other parties.[51] Among the county's 2010 Census population, 69.1% were registered to vote, including 75.6% of those ages 18 and over.[51][52]

In the 2004 U.S. Presidential election, John Kerry carried the county by a 25.5% margin over George W. Bush, with Kerry carrying the state by 6.7% over Bush.[53] Barack Obama carried the county by 34.8% over John McCain in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election, while Obama won New Jersey by 14.7%.[54]

Almost all of the county is in the 1st congressional district, which has a Cook Partisan Voting Index score of D+14.

Municipalities[edit]

Index map of Camden County Municipalities (click to see index key)

Municipalities in Camden County (with 2010 Census data for population, housing units and area) are:[55]

Municipality
(with map key)
Municipal
type
Population Housing
Units
Total
Area
Water
Area
Land
Area
Pop.
Density
Housing
Density
Communities[56]
Audubon (9) borough 8,819 3,779 1.50 0.02 1.49 5,925.7 2,539.2
Audubon Park (6) borough 1,023 499 0.16 0.01 0.15 7,046.7 3,437.3
Barrington (16) borough 6,983 3,158 1.61 0.00 1.61 4,346.0 1,965.4
Bellmawr (12) borough 11,583 4,883 3.11 0.13 2.98 3,887.7 1,638.9
Berlin (28) borough 7,588 2,949 3.60 0.01 3.59 2,114.9 821.9 New Freedom
Berlin Township (32) township 5,357 2,069 3.24 0.01 3.23 1,657.5 640.2 West Berlin
Brooklawn (11) borough 1,955 806 0.52 0.03 0.49 3,974.6 1,638.6
Camden (2) city 77,344 28,358 10.34 1.42 8.92 8,669.6 3,178.7
Cherry Hill (35) township 71,045 28,452 24.24 0.15 24.10 2,948.3 1,180.7 Ashland CDP (8,302)
Barclay CDP (4,428)
Cherry Hill Mall CDP (14,171)
Coffins Corner
Ellisburg CDP (4,413)
Golden Triangle CDP (4,145)
Greentree CDP (11,367)
Kingston Estates CDP (5,685)
Springdale CDP (14,518)
Woodcrest
Chesilhurst (29) borough 1,634 621 1.72 0.00 1.72 951.2 361.5
Clementon (25) borough 5,000 2,235 1.97 0.06 1.91 2,612.0 1,167.6
Collingswood (3) borough 13,926 6,822 1.92 0.10 1.82 7,639.4 3,742.3
Gibbsboro (24) borough 2,274 809 2.22 0.04 2.18 1,041.9 370.7
Gloucester City (5) city 11,456 4,712 2.78 0.46 2.32 4,937.8 2,031.0
Gloucester Township (33) township 64,634 24,711 23.26 0.28 22.98 2,812.2 1,075.2 Blackwood CDP (4,545)
Blenheim
Chews Landing
Erial
Glendora CDP (4,750)
Grenloch
Lakeland
Haddon Township (36) township 14,707 6,477 2.79 0.10 2.69 5,472.6 2,410.1
Haddonfield (13) borough 11,593 4,634 2.87 0.05 2.82 4,104.9 1,640.8
Haddon Heights (8) borough 7,473 3,159 1.57 0.01 1.57 4,764.1 2,013.9
Hi-Nella (20) borough 870 420 0.23 0.00 0.23 3,773.3 1,821.6
Laurel Springs (22) borough 1,908 771 0.47 0.01 0.46 4,163.7 1,682.5
Lawnside (15) borough 2,945 1,174 1.41 0.00 1.41 2,091.5 833.7
Lindenwold (23) borough 17,613 8,251 3.95 0.06 3.89 4,525.1 2,119.8
Magnolia (18) borough 4,341 1,850 0.97 0.00 0.97 4,485.3 1,911.5
Merchantville (1) borough 3,821 1,688 0.60 0.00 0.60 6,371.3 2,814.6
Mount Ephraim (10) borough 4,676 2,010 0.90 0.02 0.88 5,307.9 2,281.6
Oaklyn (7) borough 4,038 1,847 0.69 0.07 0.63 6,432.9 2,942.4
Pennsauken Township (37) township 35,885 13,275 12.08 1.65 10.44 3,438.9 1,272.2
Pine Hill (26) borough 10,233 4,357 3.91 0.04 3.87 2,643.4 1,125.5
Pine Valley (27) borough 12 22 1.00 0.02 0.98 12.2 22.4
Runnemede (17) borough 8,468 3,548 2.11 0.06 2.06 4,117.2 1,725.1
Somerdale (19) borough 5,151 2,158 1.39 0.00 1.39 3,714.0 1,556.0
Stratford (21) borough 7,040 2,761 1.55 0.00 1.55 4,547.0 1,783.3
Tavistock (14) borough 5 3 0.26 0.00 0.25 19.7 11.8
Voorhees Township (34) township 29,131 12,260 11.64 0.15 11.49 2,534.9 1,066.8 Echelon CDP (10,743)
Glendale
Kirkwood
Kresson
Osage
Waterford Township (31) township 10,649 3,839 36.27 0.23 36.04 295.5 106.5 Atco
Louden
Waterford Works
Winslow Township (30) township 39,499 14,560 58.19 0.85 57.34 688.8 253.9 Albion
Ancora
Blue Anchor
Braddock
Cedar Brook
Elm
Sicklerville
Tansboro
Woodlynne (4) borough 2,978 1,016 0.23 0.01 0.22 13,600.4 4,640.0
Camden County county 513,657 204,943 227.29 6.03 221.26 2,321.5 926.2

Historical municipalities[edit]

Defunct municipalities in the county (with years of formation and dissolution listed in parentheses) include:[9]

Education[edit]

Camden County College is a two-year public community college serving students from Camden County. the school has campuses in Blackwood, Camden and Cherry Hill and was founded in 1967.[57]

Rutgers University-Camden is located in the downtown/waterfront district of Camden, and dates back to 1926 with the founding of the South Jersey Law School.[58][59]

The Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine is located in Stratford and dates to 1976. It is the state's only osteopathic medical school and was South Jersey's first four-year college of medicine.[60]

The Cooper Medical School of Rowan University is located in the downtown/university district of Camden. Established as a four-year medical school in 1975, the relationship with Rowan University was formed in 2008.[61]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Camden County hosts numerous county, state, U.S. and Interstates. As of October 2015, the county had a total of 2,045.06 miles (3,291.21 km) of roadways, of which 1,535.22 miles (2,470.70 km) are maintained by the municipality, 377.65 miles (607.77 km) by Camden County and 104.41 miles (168.03 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 27.78 miles (44.71 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority or the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[62]

Major county roads that pass through include County Road 534, County Road 536, County Road 537, County Road 543, County Road 544, County Road 551 and County Road 561.

State routes that pass through are Route 38, Route 41, Route 42 (the North-South Freeway), Route 47 (only in Brooklawn), Route 70, Route 73, Route 90 (the Betsy Ross Bridge), Route 143 (only in Winslow), Route 154 (only in Cherry Hill) and Route 168.

U.S. Routes that traverse are U.S. Route 30 and U.S. Route 130.

The interstates that pass through are Interstate 76 (part of the North-South Freeway and the Walt Whitman Bridge), Interstate 295 and Interstate 676 (part of the North-South Freeway and the Ben Franklin Bridge (which is multiplexed with US 30)).

Other limited access roads that pass through are the Atlantic City Expressway and the New Jersey Turnpike. There are five ACE interchanges that are within the county borders: Exits 44 (at NJ 42),[63] 41 (at Berlin-Cross Keys Road / CR 689),[64] 38 (at Williamstown-New Freedom Road / CR 536 Spur),[65] 33 (connecting to NJ 73)[65] and 31 (at NJ 73).[66][67] The only turnpike interchange that is in the county is Exit 3 at the border of Runnemede and Bellmawr.[68]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit has stations along the Atlantic City Line in Pennsauken, Cherry Hill, Lindenwold and Atco in Waterford Township, connecting Philadelphia to Atlantic City along the former Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines main line.[69]

The River Line is a diesel tram-train light-rail system operated for New Jersey Transit by the Southern New Jersey Rail Group on a former Pennsylvania Railroad line from Trenton. Most stations in the county are in the City of Camden, including the Walter Rand Transportation Center, except for the Pennsauken Transit Center located in Pennsauken Township.[70]

The PATCO Speedline, owned by the Delaware River Port Authority, runs a rapid transit line across the Ben Franklin Bridge from Philadelphia through Camden to the PRSL main right-of-way between Haddonfield and its eastern terminus in Lindenwold. Suburban station stops include Woodcrest, Westmont and Collingswood.[71]

New Jersey Transit provides commuter and long distance bus service from many locations in the county to Philadelphia, with additional service to Atlantic City, New Jersey. Extensive local service is offered within the county, including routes to Camden and area train and light rail stations.[72]

Wineries[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Camden County, NJ, National Association of Counties. Accessed January 20, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d e f DP1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 21, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Camden County, New Jersey, 2010 United States Census. Accessed August 23, 2011.
  5. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000; Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 21, 2013.
  6. ^ NJ Labor Market Views, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, March 15, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, p. 6, CPH-2-32. United States Census Bureau, August 2012, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 31, 2013. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  8. ^ a b PEPANNRES: Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  9. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 103. Accessed January 20, 2013.
  10. ^ Greenberg, Gail. County History, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed October 9, 2013. "The namesake of the new settlement was Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden, an English nobleman who supported the American cause in Parliament."
  11. ^ May 2012 Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Definitions, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  12. ^ Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas, Office of Management and Budget, February 28, 2013. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  13. ^ Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Counties, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  14. ^ New Jersey County High Points, Peakbagger.com. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  15. ^ Areas touching Camden County, MapIt. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  16. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Camden, New Jersey". The Weather Channel. Retrieved October 13, 2012. 
  17. ^ State & County QuickFacts for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  18. ^ Forstall, Richard L. Population of states and counties of the United States: 1790 to 1990 from the Twenty-one Decennial Censuses, pp. 108-109. United States Census Bureau, March 1996. ISBN 9780934213486. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  19. ^ American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ a b c Tables DP-1 to DP-4 from Census 2000 for Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 6, 2008. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  21. ^ DP-2 - Profile of Selected Social Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  22. ^ DP-3 - Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000 from Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  23. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  24. ^ a b Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  25. ^ Freeholder Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  26. ^ Freeholder Edward T. McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  27. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  28. ^ Freeholder Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  29. ^ Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  30. ^ Freeholder Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  31. ^ Jonathan L. Young, Sr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  32. ^ Daniels, Mark. "Carpenters union official tapped for Camden County Freeholder seat", South Jersey Times, January 22, 2015. Accessed May 12, 2015. "Democratic leaders in Camden County have nominated a construction union official from Berlin Township to fill an open seat on the board of chosen freeholders. Jonathan L. Young Sr., 45, has been nominated to replace Scot McCray, who resigned from the board in late December, citing a desire to spend more time with his family."
  33. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  34. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  35. ^ Surrogate's Office, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  36. ^ Prosecutor's Office, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  37. ^ 2012 Congressional Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ 2011 Legislative Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  42. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2014.
  43. ^ Caffrey, Michelle. "First Latina legislator in N.J. Cruz-Perez steps into new role in state Senate", South Jersey Times, December 15, 2014. Accessed December 15, 2014. "Former Assemblywoman Nilsa Cruz-Perez was sworn into the state Senate on Monday, filling the seat left vacant by U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross. Democrat Cruz-Perez, sworn in by Senate President Steve Sweeney, will represent the 5th district in the state legislature after Norcross was elected to replace former Congressman Rob Andrews."
  44. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  47. ^ Official List - Candidates for President For GENERAL ELECTION 11/06/2012 Election, Secretary of State of New Jersey, December 6, 2012. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  48. ^ New Jersey: Presidential County Results , The New York Times. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  49. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  50. ^ Official List Candidates for President For November 2000 General Election, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, April 17, 2008. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  51. ^ a b Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, as of October 31, 2014. Accessed May 11, 2015.
  52. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County / County Equivalent from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 11, 2015.
  53. ^ New Jersey Presidential Election Returns by County 2004, Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University. Accessed August 31, 2008.
  54. ^ New Jersey – Election Results 2008, The New York Times. Accessed November 28, 2008.
  55. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  56. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  57. ^ About Us, Camden County College. Accessed October 3, 2013. "Its three distinct campuses in Blackwood, Camden and Cherry Hill – along with its satellite locations in Lakeland, Sicklerville and elsewhere throughout the County – share the common mission of providing accessible, affordable higher education and occupational study to all who can benefit.... Camden County College’s mission was launched when what had been the Mother of the Savior Seminary was purchased early in 1967. That fall, the first class of Camden County College students was taking courses on what had become the Blackwood Campus."
  58. ^ About Rutgers–Camden, Rutgers University-Camden. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  59. ^ Campus History, Rutgers University-Camden. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  60. ^ About, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  61. ^ History, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  62. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 25, 2013.
  63. ^ Exit 44, Atlantic City Expressway. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  64. ^ Exit 41, Atlantic City Expressway. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  65. ^ a b Exit 33, Atlantic City Expressway. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  66. ^ Exit 31, Atlantic City Expressway. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  67. ^ AC Expressway Map, Atlantic City Expressway. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  68. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  69. ^ Atlantic City Rail Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  70. ^ RiverLINE Map, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  71. ^ Overview, PATCO Speedline. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  72. ^ Camden County Bus / Tail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the internet Archive as of may 22, 2009. Accessed May 13, 2015.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°48′N 74°58′W / 39.80°N 74.96°W / 39.80; -74.96