Cameroonian cuisine

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Ndolé is a dish in Cameroon
Maize is a staple food in Cameroon
Location of Cameroon

Cameroonian cuisine (French: cuisine camerounaise) is one of the most varied in Africa due to its location on the crossroads between the north, west, and center of the continent; the diversity in ethnicity with mixture ranging from Bantus, Semi-bantus and Shua-Arabs. Added to this is the influence of German colonialisation and later the French and English annexation of different parts of the country.

Ingredients[edit]

The soil of most of the country is very fertile and a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, both domestic and imported species, are grown. These include:

Specialties[edit]

Traditional dishes served at Ebogo in the Centre Region

Among Cameroonian specialties are:

Ndolè with meat, morrue and shrimp
  • Koki (food) (primarily consisting of blackeyed peas and red palm oil)
  • Achu soup (cocoyam fufu with an orange/yellow red palm oil soup)
Achu Soup with Taro and ox skin
Mbongo'o tjobi and banana plantain
  • Egusi soup (ground pumpkin seeds often cooked with dark leafy greens or okra)
  • Kondreh (stewed unripe plantains with herbs and spices, usually cooked with goat meat)
  • Kati kati, a grilled chicken dish[1][2][3] and traditional food of the Kom.[4]

Curries, soups and fish dishes abound, as well as meats on skewers. Insects are eaten in some parts of the country (particularly the forested regions).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kouega, Jean-Paul (November 26, 2007). A Dictionary of Cameroon English Usage. Peter Lang. ISBN 9783039110278 – via Google Books.
  2. ^ Planet, Lonely; Ham, Anthony; Grosberg, Michael; Luckham, Nana; Maric, Vesna; Ranger, Helen; Sieg, Caroline; Smith, Helena; Louis, Regis St; Stiles, Paul; Butler, Stuart (September 1, 2017). Lonely Planet West Africa. Lonely Planet. ISBN 9781787012462 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ Nde, Nkwentie, Susan (March 16, 2014). The Mirror and Nine Other Short Stories. Langaa RPCIG. ISBN 9789956791552 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Loh, Choves (January 31, 2018). "Cameroon: Laikom - the Bedrock of Kom Culture". allAfrica.com.