Camille Claudel (film)

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Camille Claudel
Camille claudel aff.jpg
Film poster
Directed byBruno Nuytten
Produced byIsabelle Adjani
Christian Fechner
Written byBruno Nuytten
Marilyn Goldin
Starring
Music byGabriel Yared
Claude Debussy (Non-original music)
CinematographyPierre Lhomme
Edited byJoëlle Hache
Jeanne Kef
Distributed byGaumont
Release date
  • 7 December 1988 (1988-12-07)
Running time
175 minutes
CountryFrance
LanguageFrench
Box office$23.7 million[1]

Camille Claudel is a 1988 French film about the life of the 19th century sculptor Camille Claudel. The movie was based on the book by Reine-Marie Paris, granddaughter of Camille's brother, the poet and diplomat Paul Claudel. It was directed by Bruno Nuytten, co-produced by Isabelle Adjani, and starred her and Gérard Depardieu. The film had a total of 2,717,136 admissions in France. [1] Adjani earned a nomination for Academy Award for Best Actress for her role, the second time in her career she was so honored and the first time a French actress was nominated for the Best Actress Oscar twice.

Plot[edit]

The film recounts the troubled life of French sculptor Camille Claudel and her long relationship with the sculptor Auguste Rodin. Beginning in the 1880s, with the young Claudel's first meeting with Rodin, the film traces the development of their intense romantic bond. The growth of this relationship coincides with the rise of Claudel's career, helping her overcome prejudices against female artists. However, their romance soon sours, due to the increasing pressures of Rodin's fame and his love for another woman. These difficulties combine with her increasing doubts about the value of her work drive Claudel into an emotional tumult that threatens to become insanity.

Cast[edit]

Awards[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b JP. "Camille Claudel (1988)- JPBox-Office". www.jpbox-office.com. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  2. ^ "The 62nd Academy Awards (1990) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 6 September 2015.
  3. ^ "Berlinale: 1989 Prize Winners". berlinale.de. Retrieved 2011-03-10.

External links[edit]