Campa Cola

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Campa-Cola
Campa-cola-orange-advertisement-indrajal-comics-india.jpg
TypeCola,orange,lime
ManufacturerCampa Beverages Private Ltd
Country of originIndia[1]
Introduced1977
Related productsThums Up, Coca-Cola, Pepsi Cola.
Websitewww.campacolaindia.com

Campa Cola, is a soft drink brand in India. It was a market leader in the Indian soft drink market the 1970s and 80s in most regions of India until the advent of the foreign players Pepsi and Coca-Cola after the liberalisation policy of the P. V. Narasimha Rao Government in 1991.[2]

History[edit]

Campa Cola was a drink created by the Pure Drinks Group in the 1970s.

The Pure Drinks Group pioneered the Indian soft drink industry when it introduced Coca-Cola into India in 1949, and were the sole manufacturers and distributors of Coca-Cola till the 1970s when Coke was asked to leave. The Pure Drinks Group and Campa Beverages Pvt. Ltd. virtually dominated the entire Indian soft drink industry for about 15 years, and then started Campa Cola during the absence of foreign competition. The brand's slogan was "The Great Indian Taste", an appeal to nationalism. It subsequently marketed an orange flavoured drink called Campa Orange, with the logo "Campa" on its bottles.[3]

During the 1980s, Campa Orange and Rush were the two main orange soft drinks in India, with large bottling plants in Mumbai (Worli) and Delhi. Following the return of foreign corporations to the soft drink market in the 1990s, the popularity of Campa Cola declined. In 2000-2001, its bottling plant and offices in Delhi were closed. In 2009 a small amount of product was still being bottled in the state of Haryana but the drink was hard to find.[4]

Current operations[edit]

It subsequently relaunched itself, with a drink called Sun Dew, and Campa in four flavours (orange, lemon, coca and mango).[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Percy Rowe (2005), Delhi, Gareth Stevens, ISBN 978-0-8368-5197-7, ISBN 0836851978
  2. ^ "Old India Ads and Brand Ambassadors". www.blog.pkp.in. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  3. ^ "About the company". www.campacolaindia.com. Official website. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  4. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/23/technology/23iht-cola.1.20365713.html?_r=0
  5. ^ "Our branks". www.campacolaindia.com. Official website. Retrieved 20 December 2018.

External links[edit]