Campbell County, South Dakota

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Campbell County, South Dakota
Farm in campbell co south dakota.jpg
Map of South Dakota highlighting Campbell County
Location in the U.S. state of South Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting South Dakota
South Dakota's location in the U.S.
Founded 1884
Seat Mound City
Largest city Herreid
Area
 • Total 771 sq mi (1,997 km2)
 • Land 734 sq mi (1,901 km2)
 • Water 37 sq mi (96 km2), 4.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2016) 1,378
 • Density 2.0/sq mi (0.8/km2)
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5

Campbell County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,466,[1] making it the fifth-least populous county in South Dakota. Its county seat is Mound City.[2] The county was created in 1873 and organized in 1884.[3] It is named after Norman B. Campbell, a Dakota Territory legislator in 1873 and son of General Charles T. Campbell.[4]

History[edit]

Campbell County was formed in 1873 and organized in 1884. La Grace served as the first county seat; in 1888 the seat was transferred to Mound City.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 771 square miles (2,000 km2), of which 734 square miles (1,900 km2) is land and 37 square miles (96 km2) (4.8%) is water.[6]

Major Highways[edit]

Adjacent Counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
188050
18903,5106,920.0%
19004,52729.0%
19105,24415.8%
19205,3051.2%
19305,6296.1%
19405,033−10.6%
19504,046−19.6%
19603,531−12.7%
19702,866−18.8%
19802,243−21.7%
19901,965−12.4%
20001,782−9.3%
20101,466−17.7%
Est. 20171,379[7]−5.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2016[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 1,782 people, 725 households, and 508 families residing in the county. The population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 962 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 99.33% White, 0.34% Native American, 0.06% Asian, and 0.28% from two or more races. 0.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 63.1% were of German, 17.2% Norwegian and 6.4% Dutch ancestry.

There were 725 households out of which 30.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.80% were married couples living together, 2.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 28.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.40% under the age of 18, 3.50% from 18 to 24, 24.50% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 22.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 100.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,793, and the median income for a family was $35,938. Males had a median income of $22,128 versus $17,237 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,117. About 11.20% of families and 14.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.70% of those under age 18 and 22.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,466 people, 694 households, and 423 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 2.0 inhabitants per square mile (0.77/km2). There were 980 housing units at an average density of 1.3 per square mile (0.50/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 98.3% white, 0.3% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.1% black or African American, 0.2% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.4% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 68.5% were German, 14.1% were Norwegian, 12.6% were Dutch, 11.4% were Russian, 7.8% were Irish, and 2.7% were American.[15]

Of the 694 households, 21.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.6% were married couples living together, 3.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.0% were non-families, and 35.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.70. The median age was 50.1 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $42,833 and the median income for a family was $48,864. Males had a median income of $41,563 versus $30,705 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,338. About 6.1% of families and 10.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.8% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Religion[edit]

The biggest denomination was the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America with 286 adherents, followed by the Catholic church with 191 members, the third was the Presbyterian Church in America with 186 followers as of 2010. The Reformed Church in the United States, the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the North American Baptist Conference was also represented but in much smaller adherence rate.[17] Campbell County has the highest percentage of Presbyterians in the entire USA.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Towns[edit]

Townships[edit]

The county is divided into two areas of unorganized territory: North Campbell and South Campbell.

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 84.7% 704 12.6% 105 2.7% 22
2012 78.3% 616 19.4% 153 2.3% 18
2008 69.2% 591 28.5% 243 2.3% 20
2004 73.8% 708 24.9% 239 1.3% 12
2000 80.6% 739 16.0% 147 3.4% 31
1996 64.2% 623 20.8% 202 15.0% 145
1992 54.5% 574 21.1% 222 24.4% 257
1988 72.6% 909 26.7% 334 0.7% 9
1984 82.5% 1,035 17.1% 214 0.5% 6
1980 84.9% 1,271 12.2% 182 3.0% 45
1976 64.5% 897 35.2% 489 0.4% 5
1972 76.1% 1,169 23.5% 361 0.5% 7
1968 79.3% 1,216 16.0% 245 4.8% 73
1964 73.9% 1,162 26.1% 411
1960 78.6% 1,330 21.4% 362
1956 81.4% 1,268 18.6% 289
1952 90.1% 1,536 9.9% 168
1948 78.1% 1,518 21.1% 410 0.9% 17
1944 83.4% 1,047 16.6% 208
1940 80.6% 1,733 19.4% 416
1936 61.0% 1,236 36.3% 736 2.7% 55
1932 40.4% 770 58.6% 1,116 1.0% 18
1928 69.1% 1,346 30.2% 588 0.7% 13
1924 54.6% 641 3.9% 46 41.5% 488
1920 71.3% 1,128 4.2% 67 24.5% 388
1916 77.4% 644 19.6% 163 3.0% 25
1912 19.6% 150 80.4% 616
1908 75.2% 627 21.0% 175 3.8% 32
1904 83.0% 685 14.6% 120 2.4% 20
1900 70.4% 626 28.1% 250 1.5% 13
1896 54.6% 449 44.9% 369 0.5% 4
1892 58.1% 390 11.5% 77 30.4% 204

With its rural German-American heritage, Campbell is an overwhelmingly Republican county. It has only once been carried by a Democratic Presidential candidate, during Franklin D. Roosevelt’s landslide victory of 1932. Nonetheless, in the following election when FDR gained a even more emphatic victory by carrying forty-six of forty-eight states, his Republican opponent Alf Landon carried Campbell County by twenty-five percentage points, making the county Landon’s second-strongest in the Plains States behind Brown County in his home state. Since 1940, no Democrat has so much as equalled Roosevelt’s 1936 share of the vote, and even before 1932, only William Jennings Bryan in 1896 gained over forty percent of the vote for the Democratic Party. In 1952, Campbell was Dwight D. Eisenhower’s third-strongest county in the nation,[19] and in 1964 it rivalled Hooker County in Nebraska and that famous GOP bastion Jackson County in Kentucky as Barry Goldwater’s strongest county outside the South.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 26, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. Retrieved March 29, 2015. 
  4. ^ Legislative Manual, South Dakota, 2005, p. 596
  5. ^ Hellmann, Paul T. (May 13, 2013). Historical Gazetteer of the United States. Routledge. p. 993. Retrieved 30 November 2013. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved April 16, 2018. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 23, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-11. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-11. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-11. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-11. 
  17. ^ www.thearda.com/rcms2010/r/c/46/rcms2010_46021_county_name_2010.asp
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-04-13. 
  19. ^ Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas; 1952 Presidential Election Statistics

Coordinates: 45°46′N 100°03′W / 45.76°N 100.05°W / 45.76; -100.05