Campbelltown, Guyana

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Campbelltown
Village
CountryFlag of Guyana.svg Guyana Claimed by Flag of Venezuela.svgVenezuela[1]
Region StatePotaro-Siparuni (Bolívar state by Venezuela)
Population
 (2002)
 • Total219

Campbelltown is an Amerindian village in the Potaro-Siparuni Region of Guyana, north of Mahdia, claimed by Venezuela as part of Bolívar state, who is localizated in the Guayana Esequiba.

It is managed by the Village Captain (Touchau), a Vice Captain and five councilors. This community has a population of 219 persons, being Amerindians and mixed people of part Amerindian descent. The residents of this village are members of the Wapishana, Arawak, Patamona and Carib tribes. There has been some degree of integration between the Amerindians and Afro-Guyanese and the Brazilian miners, but none of these race groups live in the village.

Farming is the main economic activity and subsistence farming is practiced by the residents on farmlands miles away from the village. Some of the Amerindian men are employed as guides, gold miners, labourers and drivers. Some women from this area work at the Regional Office, the schools and some of the stores in the Madhia community. Most of the other residents hunt, fish and farm for their livelihood. The women reported that men live in the mining camps. This has resulted in several families being headed by women.

There are no industries, shops or businesses in this community. There is a community ground and an Amerindian hostel which provides free accommodation for Amerindian miners and families who are intransit.

The community has a well which is powered by a windmill. Residents usually depend on rainwater and creek water whenever the well malfunctions. Campbelltown has no other utility service. This community is accessible by road from Madhia and by trail linked to the Bartica/Potaro road.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official Announcements". Archived from the original on 8 September 2016. Retrieved 28 July 2016.