Campus of Clemson University

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The Campus of Clemson University was originally the site of U.S. Vice President John C. Calhoun's plantation, named Fort Hill. The plantation passed to his daughter, Anna, and son-in-law, Thomas Green Clemson. On Clemson's death in 1888, he willed the land to the state of South Carolina for the creation of a public university.

The university was founded in 1889, and three buildings from the initial construction still exist today: Hardin Hall (built in 1890), Tillman Hall (1894), and Godfrey Hall (1898). Other periods of large expansion occurred in 1936–1938, when 8 new buildings constructed, and the late 1950s through 1970, when no fewer than 25 buildings were constructed, most in a similar architectural style.

The campus contains two historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Clemson University Historic District I on the northern edge of campus, and the Clemson University Historic District II in the center of campus.

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Academic buildings[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Barre Hall CU Barre Hall Aug2010.jpg 1976 Walter Barre, Professor of Agriculture (1907–1934) Houses the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences. 34°40′29.3″N 82°50′7.2″W / 34.674806°N 82.835333°W / 34.674806; -82.835333 (Barre Hall) [1]
Biosystems Research Complex CU Biosystems Research Complex Aug2010.jpg 2004 34°40′27.3″N 82°49′56.3″W / 34.674250°N 82.832306°W / 34.674250; -82.832306 (Biosystems Research Complex) [2]
Brackett Hall CU Brackett Hall Aug2010.jpg 1951 (addition, 1966; renovation, 1992) Richard Newman Brackett, Professor of Chemistry (1891–1937) Houses the Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology departments. 34°40′44.3″N 82°50′12.0″W / 34.678972°N 82.836667°W / 34.678972; -82.836667 (Brackett Hall) [3]
Brooks Center for the Performing Arts CU Brooks Center Aug2010.jpg 1994 Robert Howell Brooks (class of 1960) 34°40′25.6″N 82°50′10.0″W / 34.673778°N 82.836111°W / 34.673778; -82.836111 (Brooks Center for the Performing Arts) [4]
Cook Engineering Laboratory CU Cook Laboratory Aug2010.jpg 1965 James Clinton Cook, Jr., professor of mechanical engineering, 1948–68 34°40′35.5″N 82°50′15.9″W / 34.676528°N 82.837750°W / 34.676528; -82.837750 (Cook Engineering Laboratory) [5]
Cooper Library CU Library & Pond Aug2010.jpg 1966 Robert Muldrow Cooper, life member and president of the Board of Trustees, 1922–66 34°40′35.9″N 82°50′11.2″W / 34.676639°N 82.836444°W / 34.676639; -82.836444 (Cooper Library) [6]
Daniel Hall CU Daniel Hall Aug2010.jpg 1968 David Wistar Daniel, professor of English, 1898–1947 Houses Communications, English, and Foreign Language departments. 34°40′37.6″N 82°50′6.8″W / 34.677111°N 82.835222°W / 34.677111; -82.835222 (Daniel Hall) [7]
Earle Hall CU Earle Hall Aug2010.jpg 1959 Samuel Broadus Earle, professor of engineering and President of Clemson Agricultural College 1919, 1924–1925 Houses the department of Chemical Engineering. 34°40′32.7″N 82°50′24.6″W / 34.675750°N 82.840167°W / 34.675750; -82.840167 (Earle Hall) [8]
Edwards Hall CU Edwards Hall Aug2010.jpg 1977 Robert Cook Edwards (class of 1933), President of Clemson University, 1958–1979 Houses the department of Nursing. 34°40′36.5″N 82°50′2.0″W / 34.676806°N 82.833889°W / 34.676806; -82.833889 (Edwards Hall) [9]
Endocrine Physiology Laboratory CU Endocrine Physiology Lab Aug2010.jpg 34°40′17.1″N 82°50′5.3″W / 34.671417°N 82.834806°W / 34.671417; -82.834806 (Endocrine Physiology Laboratory)
Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building (EIB) Fluor Daniel EIB.jpg 1995 Alumni and friends at the Fluor Daniel Corporation Houses the Mechanical Engineering department. 34°40′31.4″N 82°50′21.7″W / 34.675389°N 82.839361°W / 34.675389; -82.839361 (Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building) [10]
Freeman Hall CU Freeman Hall Aug2010.jpg 1926, renovated 1965 Edwin Jones Freeman, professor of industrial engineering, 1924–1961 Houses the department of Industrial Engineering. 34°40′34.1″N 82°50′16.8″W / 34.676139°N 82.838000°W / 34.676139; -82.838000 (Freeman Hall) [11]
Godfrey Hall CU Godfrey Hall Aug2010.jpg 1908, renovated 1987 W. E. Godfrey, professor of physics, 1919–1947 Godfrey Hall, originally named the Textile Building, currently serves as classroom and office space for the departments of Education and Graphic Communications. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District I (NRHP). 34°40′51.1″N 82°50′16.4″W / 34.680861°N 82.837889°W / 34.680861; -82.837889 (Godfrey Hall) [12][13]
Godley-Snell Research Center 1995 W. C. Godley (class of 1943), professor; and Absalom W. Snell (class of 1949), professor The Godley-Snell Research Center is the university's centralized animal research facility. 34°40′20.0″N 82°49′57.0″W / 34.672222°N 82.832500°W / 34.672222; -82.832500 (Godley-Snell Research Center) [14] [15]
Hardin Hall CU Hardin Hall Aug2010.jpg 1890; renovations 1900, 1937, 1946 & 2002 Mark Bernard Hardin, President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1897, 1899, 1902 Hardin Hall is the oldest academic building on campus. It was originally built as the Chemistry laboratory, it was expanded in 1900 and 1937, and has housed the Education department and administration offices.[16] It currently houses the departments of History, Philosophy, and Religion. The building is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District II (NRHP). 34°40′41.8″N 82°50′12.9″W / 34.678278°N 82.836917°W / 34.678278; -82.836917 (Hardin Hall) [17]
Holtzendorff Hall CU Holtzendorff Hall Aug2010 01.jpg 1916 Preston Brooks Holtzendorff, athletic coach and General Secretary of the Clemson YMCA, 1919–1959 Holtzendorff Hall was built as a YMCA building with a grand from John D. Rockefeller. The Italian Renaissance Revival building, designed by Department of Architecture Chairman Rudolph E. Lee, heralded the style of many other early campus buildings. The interior has been extensively renovated, and now houses classrooms and offices for the General Engineering program. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District I (NRHP). 34°40′53.4″N 82°50′16.0″W / 34.681500°N 82.837778°W / 34.681500; -82.837778 (Holtzendorff Hall) [13][18]
Hunter Chemistry Laboratory Hunter chem lab.jpg 1987 Howard L. Hunter, professor of chemistry and dean, 1928–1969 Houses the department of Chemistry. 34°40′34.9″N 82°50′21.8″W / 34.676361°N 82.839389°W / 34.676361; -82.839389 (Holtzendorff Hall) [19]
Jordan Hall CU Jordan Hall Aug2010.jpg 1974 Frank Marshall Jordan (class of 1902) and his wife, Evelyn V. Jordan Houses the Department of Genetics and Biochemistry. 34°40′38.6″N 82°50′4.0″W / 34.677389°N 82.834444°W / 34.677389; -82.834444 (Jordan Hall) [20]
Kinard Laboratory of Physics CU Kinard Hall Aug2010.jpg 1961 Francis Marion Kinard, professor of English and dean, 1924–60 Houses the Physics department. 34°40′39.0″N 82°50′6.8″W / 34.677500°N 82.835222°W / 34.677500; -82.835222 (Kinard Laboratory of Physics) [21]
Lee Hall CU Lee Hall Aug2010.jpg 1958; addition 1968 Rudolph E. Lee (class of 1896), Professor of Drawing & Design, 1898–1948; Head of the Architecture Department, 1933–48; architect of many campus buildings Houses the Architecture department. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 34°40′27.9″N 82°50′18.8″W / 34.674417°N 82.838556°W / 34.674417; -82.838556 (Lee Hall) [22]
Lehotsky Hall CU Lehotsky Hall Aug2010.jpg 1975 Koloman Lehotsky, professor of forestry and dean, 1956–69 Houses the departments of Forestry; Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management; and Wildlife & Fisheries Biology. 34°40′26.2″N 82°50′6.7″W / 34.673944°N 82.835194°W / 34.673944; -82.835194 (Lehotsky Hall) [23]
Long Hall CU Long Hall Aug2010.jpg 1937 William Williams Long, director of Cooperative Extension Service, 1914–34 Long Hall was originally constructed for the Agriculture department. It was built on the former site of the university's cooperative extension service. It was designed in an Italianate style by Rudolph E. Lee. It is currently the home of the Biology department. The buildings is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District I (NRHP). 34°40′40.9″N 82°50′4.3″W / 34.678028°N 82.834528°W / 34.678028; -82.834528 (Long Hall) [13][24]
Lowry Hall CU Lowry Hall Aug2010.jpg 1958 Walter L. Lowry, Jr., professor and dean, College of Engineering, 1949–61 Houses the Civil Engineering department. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 34°40′31.4″N 82°50′17.4″W / 34.675389°N 82.838167°W / 34.675389; -82.838167 (Lowry Hall) [25]
Martin Hall CU Martin Hall Aug2010.jpg 1962 Samuel Maner Martin, Professor of Mathematics, 1898–1948 Houses the Mathematics department. 34°40′41.6″N 82°50′8.2″W / 34.678222°N 82.835611°W / 34.678222; -82.835611 (Martin Hall) [26]
McAdams Hall CU McAdams Hall Aug2010.jpg 1950; renovations & additions: 1976, 2004 William N. McAdams (class of 1938), professor of agricultural engineering, 1939–59 Houses the Computer Science and Agricultural & Biological Engineering departments. 34°40′32.0″N 82°50′4.2″W / 34.675556°N 82.834500°W / 34.675556; -82.834500 (McAdams Hall) [27]
Newman Hall CU Newman Hall Aug2010.jpg 1959 J. S. Newman, professor of agriculture, 1892–1905; and Charles Carter Newman (class of 1898), professor of horticulture, 1899–1946 Houses the Packaging Science department. 34°40′28.6″N 82°50′0.5″W / 34.674611°N 82.833472°W / 34.674611; -82.833472 (Newman Hall) [28]
Olin Hall CU Olin Hall Aug2010.jpg 1953 Franklin W. Olin, founder of the Olin Foundation Houses the Ceramic and Materials Engineering department. 34°40′39.6″N 82°50′13.2″W / 34.677667°N 82.837000°W / 34.677667; -82.837000 (Olin Hall) [29]
Poole Agricultural Center (P&A Building) CU Poole Agricultural Center Aug2010.jpg 1955 Robert Franklin Poole, President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1940–58 Houses the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences. 34°40′25.8″N 82°50′3.1″W / 34.673833°N 82.834194°W / 34.673833; -82.834194 (Poole Agricultural Center) [30]
Rhodes Engineering Research Center CU Rhodes Annex Aug2010.jpg 1968, annex 2009 Samuel R. Rhodes (class of 1907), first editor of The Tiger, Head of Electrical Engineering Dept., 1933–1954 Houses the Bioengineering department. 34°40′35.1″N 82°50′14.7″W / 34.676417°N 82.837417°W / 34.676417; -82.837417 (Rhodes Engineering Research Center) [31]
Riggs Hall CU Riggs Hall Aug2010.jpg 1928 Walter Merritt Riggs, President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1910–24; professor of mechanical engineering and athletic coach, 1896–1909 Riggs Hall was built to replace Mechanical Hall, which burned in 1926. It was designed by Architecture department chairman Rudolph E. Lee. The departments of Architecture, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering were the first tenants. Architecture and Civil Engineering moved into the new Structural Science Building in 1958, but Electrical and Mechanical Engineering are still located in the building.[16] It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District II (NRHP). 34°40′37.2″N 82°50′16.4″W / 34.677000°N 82.837889°W / 34.677000; -82.837889 (Riggs Hall) [32]
Sirrine Hall CU Sirrine Hall Aug2010.jpg 1938; renovated, 1978 Joseph E. Sirrine, life trustee of Clemson Agricultural College, 1928–47 Sirrine Hall was built to replace Godfrey Hall as the Textile building. It was one of 8 buildings built between 1936 and 1938, and designed by Rudolph E. Lee in an Italian Renaissance Revival style.[16] Today, the building houses the College of Business. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District II (NRHP). 34°40′37.4″N 82°50′21.5″W / 34.677056°N 82.839306°W / 34.677056; -82.839306 (Sirrine Hall) [33]
Harris A. Smith Building CU Harris A. Smith Building Aug2010.jpg 2009 Harris A. Smith Houses the Sonoco Institute of Packaging Design and Graphics 34°40′29.1″N 82°50′21.2″W / 34.674750°N 82.839222°W / 34.674750; -82.839222 (Sirrine Hall)
Tillman Hall Tillman Hall 2008.jpg 1892 Benjamin Ryan Tillman, Governor of South Carolina, 1890–95; United States Senator, 1895–1918; life trustee of Clemson Agricultural College, 1888–1918 Tillman Hall is the University's clock tower and signature building. It was designed by Atlanta architects Bruce & Morgan, also responsible for other university buildings around the South. The building featured the first library, many classrooms and laboratories, and a chapel. Originally known as the Main Building, it was named for Trustee Tillman by the Board of Trustees in July 1946.[34] Today, it houses the Education department and an auditorium. Along with Godfrey Hall and Hardin Hall, it is one of the few remaining buildings from the first phase of construction on campus. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District I (NRHP). 34°40′48.6″N 82°50′15.2″W / 34.680167°N 82.837556°W / 34.680167; -82.837556 (Tillman Hall) [13][35]

Administrative buildings[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Class of 1944 Alumni Center CU Visitors Center Aug2010.jpg 1972 Class of 1944 The Alumni Center was a donation of the Class of 1944, and currently houses the visitors center and offices. 34°40′53.8″N 82°50′7.1″W / 34.681611°N 82.835306°W / 34.681611; -82.835306 (Class of 1944 Alumni Center) [36]
Mell Hall CU Mell Hall Aug2010.jpg 1940 Patrick Hues Mell, Jr., President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1902–10 Mell Hall was built as a post office to serve the university and the town of Clemson. After separate post offices were built in 1973, the building became part of the university. Today, it houses offices for the University Housing department. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District I (NRHP). 34°40′55.1″N 82°50′15.5″W / 34.681972°N 82.837639°W / 34.681972; -82.837639 (Mell Hall) [13][37]
Strode Tower CU Strode Tower Aug2010.jpg 1969 Henry Aubrey Strode, first President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1890–93 Houses offices for the English, Foreign Language, and Communication departments. 34°40′36.5″N 82°50′6.2″W / 34.676806°N 82.835056°W / 34.676806; -82.835056 (Strode Tower) [38]
Sikes Hall SikesHall.jpg 1904, rebuilt after fire, 1927 Enoch Walter Sikes, President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1925–40 Sikes Hall was built when the Agriculture department outgrew its space in Tillman Hall. Situated at the original entrance to John C. Calhoun's Fort Hill Plantation, the building was designed by Rudolph E. Lee, and modeled after the Library of Congress Building. After a fire in 1924, it was remodeled into a library. Today, Sikes is the main administration building. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District I (NRHP). 34°40′45.6″N 82°50′6.7″W / 34.679333°N 82.835194°W / 34.679333; -82.835194 (Strode Hall) [13][39]

Residential buildings[edit]

Bryan Mall, "The Horseshoe"[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Barnett Hall CU Barnett Hall Aug2010.jpg 1965 W. D. Barnett (class of 1910), Trustee, 1920–32 and 1935–40; president of alumni association, 1934–36 Originally named "East Campus Dormitory #2". 34°40′40.9″N 82°49′57.3″W / 34.678028°N 82.832583°W / 34.678028; -82.832583 (Barnett Hall) [40]
Byrnes Hall CU Byrnes Hall Aug2010.jpg 1970 James F. Byrnes, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, 1941–42; Secretary of State, 1945–47; Governor of South Carolina, 1951–55; Life Trustee, 1941–72 34°40′38.7″N 82°49′52.7″W / 34.677417°N 82.831306°W / 34.677417; -82.831306 (Byrnes Hall) [41]
Lever Hall CU Lever Hall Aug2010.jpg 1968 Asbury Francis Lever, Life Trustee, 1913–40 34°40′36.9″N 82°49′53.8″W / 34.676917°N 82.831611°W / 34.676917; -82.831611 (Lever Hall) [42]
Manning Hall CU Manning Hall Aug2010.jpg 1967 Richard I. Manning III, Governor of South Carolina, 1915–19; Life Trustee, 1909–31 34°40′37.8″N 82°49′56.3″W / 34.677167°N 82.832306°W / 34.677167; -82.832306 (Manning Hall) [43]
Mauldin Hall CU Mauldin Hall Aug2010.jpg 1963 William H. Mauldin, Trustee, 1894–1900; and Ivy M. Mauldin, Trustee, 1906–27 Originally named "East Campus Dormitory #1". 34°40′40.5″N 82°49′59.4″W / 34.677917°N 82.833167°W / 34.677917; -82.833167 (Mauldin Hall) [43]
Smith Hall CU Smith Hall Aug2010.jpg 1972 Winchester C. Smith, Jr., Life Trustee, 1954–72 Originally named "East Campus Dormitory #3". 34°40′41.3″N 82°49′55.1″W / 34.678139°N 82.831972°W / 34.678139; -82.831972 (SmithHall) [44]

The Shoeboxes[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Benet Hall CU Benet Hall Aug2010.jpg 1962 Christie Benet, Life Trustee, 1929–51 34°40′38.9″N 82°50′24.7″W / 34.677472°N 82.840194°W / 34.677472; -82.840194 (Benet Hall) [45]
Cope Hall CU Cope Hall Aug2010.jpg 1965 Frank Elmo Cope, Trustee, 1926–56 34°40′42.0″N 82°50′24.2″W / 34.678333°N 82.840056°W / 34.678333; -82.840056 (Cope Hall) [46]
Geer Hall CU Geer Hall Aug2010.jpg 1966 Bennett Eugene Geer, Trustee, 1922–28 34°40′41.5″N 82°50′26.3″W / 34.678194°N 82.840639°W / 34.678194; -82.840639 (Geer Hall) [47]
Sanders Hall CU Sanders Hall Aug2010.jpg 1966 Paul Sanders, Trustee, 1926–60 34°40′39.9″N 82°50′26.5″W / 34.677750°N 82.840694°W / 34.677750; -82.840694 (Sanders Hall) [48]
Young Hall CU Young Hall Aug2010.jpg 1962 T. B. Young, Life Trustee, 1932–60 34°40′40.5″N 82°50′24.6″W / 34.677917°N 82.840167°W / 34.677917; -82.840167 (Young Hall) [49]

Fraternity/Sorority Quad[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Bowen Hall CU Bowen Hall Aug2010.jpg 1936; renovation 2005 R. E. Bowen, Trustee, 1898–1909 Originally named Barracks #4. 34°40′50.2″N 82°50′19.7″W / 34.680611°N 82.838806°W / 34.680611; -82.838806 (Bowen Hall) [50]
Bradley Hall CU Bradley Hall Aug2010.jpg 1936; renovation 2005 J. E. Bradley, Trustee, 1888–1907 Originally named Barracks #5. 34°40′50.4″N 82°50′21.8″W / 34.680667°N 82.839389°W / 34.680667; -82.839389 (Bradley Hall) [51]
Donaldson Hall CU Donaldson Hall Aug2010.jpg 1936; renovation 2005 Milton Lafayette Donaldson, Trustee, 1888–1924 Originally named Barracks #6. 34°40′51.7″N 82°50′19.5″W / 34.681028°N 82.838750°W / 34.681028; -82.838750 (Donaldson Hall) [52]
Norris Hall CU Norris Hall Aug2010.jpg 1939; renovation 2005 Daniel Keating Norris, Trustee, 1888–1905 Originally named Barracks #8. 34°40′49.3″N 82°50′20.9″W / 34.680361°N 82.839139°W / 34.680361; -82.839139 (Norris Hall) [53]
Simpson Hall CU Simpson Hall South Aug2010.jpg 2005 34°40′50.8″N 82°50′18.3″W / 34.680778°N 82.838417°W / 34.680778; -82.838417 (Simpson Hall)
Wannamaker Hall CU Wannamaker Hall Aug2010.jpg 1936; renovation 2005 J. E. Wannamaker, Life Trustee, 1888–1935 Originally named Barracks #7. 34°40′52.0″N 82°50′21.5″W / 34.681111°N 82.839306°W / 34.681111; -82.839306 (Wannamaker Hall) [54]

On-campus apartments[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Calhoun Courts CU Calhoun Courts Aug2010.jpg 1982 Patrick Noble Calhoun (class of 1932), Life Trustee, 1966–76 34°40′39.4″N 82°49′45.7″W / 34.677611°N 82.829361°W / 34.677611; -82.829361 (Calhoun Courts) [55]
Lightsey Bridge I 1992 Edward Oswald Lightsey, Trustee, 1963–77 34°40′26.0″N 82°49′42.9″W / 34.673889°N 82.828583°W / 34.673889; -82.828583 (Lightsey Bridge I) [56]
Lightsey Bridge II CU Lightsey Bridge II Aug2010.jpg 2001 Edward Oswald Lightsey, Trustee, 1963–77 34°40′30.3″N 82°49′37.0″W / 34.675083°N 82.826944°W / 34.675083; -82.826944 (Lightsey Bridge II) [56]
Thornhill Village CU Thornhill Village Aug2010.jpg unknown T. Wilbur Thornhill, Trustee, 1947–60 34°40′41.0″N 82°49′35.2″W / 34.678056°N 82.826444°W / 34.678056; -82.826444 (Thornhill Village) [57]

Others[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Clemson House CU Clemson House Aug2010.jpg 1950 Thomas Green Clemson Originally a hotel, now a residence hall featuring suites & apartments, as well as a dining hall. Closed May 2016 in order to be demolished and replaced by the CORE Campus Project.[58] 34°40′51.5″N 82°50′2.6″W / 34.680972°N 82.834056°W / 34.680972; -82.834056 (Clemson House) [59]
Holmes Hall CU Holmes Hall Aug2010.jpg 1994 Lewis D. Holmes, Trustee, 1960–73 34°40′43.8″N 82°50′20.7″W / 34.678833°N 82.839083°W / 34.678833; -82.839083 (Holmes Hall) [60]
Johnstone Hall A Johnstone Hall (Clemson University).JPG 1954 Alan Johnstone, Trustee, 1890–1929; President of the Board of Trustees, 1907–1929 34°40′48.0″N 82°50′16.9″W / 34.680000°N 82.838028°W / 34.680000; -82.838028 (Johnstone Hall) [61]
McCabe Hall CU McCabe Hall Aug2010.jpg 1994 W. Gordon McCabe, Jr., Trustee, 1960–78 34°40′43.7″N 82°50′17.9″W / 34.678806°N 82.838306°W / 34.678806; -82.838306 (McCabe Hall) [62]
Stadium Residence Hall CU Stadium Suites Aug2010.jpg 2002 Its location overlooking Memorial Stadium 34°40′42.1″N 82°50′28.4″W / 34.678361°N 82.841222°W / 34.678361; -82.841222 (Stadium Residence Hall) [63]
CORE Campus 2016 Its location in the center of campus 668 bed housing facility across 3 buildings. Bottom floor contains a 900-seat dining hall and a 300-seat dining center. The dining center contains food shops such as Starbucks and Which Wich. 34°40′45.4296″N 82°50′22.4340″W / 34.679286000°N 82.839565000°W / 34.679286000; -82.839565000 (Douthit Hills) [64]
Douthit Hills August 2018 (projected) New residence hall proposed to be completed August 2017. Will house 1,700 more students when project complete. 34°40′50.25″N 82°49′45.8292″W / 34.6806250°N 82.829397000°W / 34.6806250; -82.829397000 (Douthit Hills) [65]

Dining halls & Unions[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Edgar A. Brown University Union CU Brown Union Aug2010.jpg 1976 Edgar Allan Brown, South Carolina state senator, life trustee and president of the Board of Trustees, 1934–75 34°40′45.5″N 82°50′17.4″W / 34.679306°N 82.838167°W / 34.679306; -82.838167 (Edgar A. Brown University Union) [66]
Fernow Street Cafe CU Fernow Street Cafe Aug2010.jpg 34°40′35.8″N 82°50′17.1″W / 34.676611°N 82.838083°W / 34.676611; -82.838083 (Fernow Street Cafe)
Harcombe Hall 1954; renovated, 1993 Capt. J. D. Harcombe, mess officer, c. 1924 Replaced by dining hall in CORE Campus building. Will still offer food service for Summer 2017. 34°40′46.9″N 82°50′18.9″W / 34.679694°N 82.838583°W / 34.679694; -82.838583 (Harcombe Hall) [67][68]
Hendrix Student Center CU Hendrix Student Center Aug2010.jpg 2000 Leon James Hendrix, Jr. (class of 1963, MS 1968) WSBF-FM 34°40′33.8″N 82°49′55.1″W / 34.676056°N 82.831972°W / 34.676056; -82.831972 (Hendrix Student Center) [69]
Schilletter Dining Hall CU Schilletter Dining Hall Aug2010.jpg 1968 August Schilletter, Steward of Clemson College; in charge of kitchens & mess hall, 1900–1918 34°40′36.9″N 82°49′58.3″W / 34.676917°N 82.832861°W / 34.676917; -82.832861 (Schilleter Dining Hall) [70]

Athletic & recreation buildings[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Doug Kingsmore Stadium Clemson baseball panoramic 1.jpg 1970 Doug Kingsmore, former Clemson baseball player and Trustee Emeritus Baseball stadium; capacity of 5,617, record crowd of 6,480. 34°40′44.7″N 82°50′57.2″W / 34.679083°N 82.849222°W / 34.679083; -82.849222 (Doug Kingsmore Stadium) [71]
Fike Recreation Center CU Fike Recreation Center Aug2010.jpg 1940, renovated 2002 Rupert Howard Fike (class of 1908), physician and founder of IPTAY Student recreation center 34°40′50.5″N 82°50′31.0″W / 34.680694°N 82.841944°W / 34.680694; -82.841944 (Doug Kingsmore Stadium) [72]
Jervey Athletic Center CU Jervey Gym Aug2010.jpg 1973, renovated 1995 Frank Johnstone Jervey (class of 1914), life trustee, 1965–1975; vice president for development Houses the Volleyball teams, athletic offices, and training facilities 34°40′44.8″N 82°50′53.2″W / 34.679111°N 82.848111°W / 34.679111; -82.848111 (Jervey Athletic Center) [73][74]
Littlejohn Coliseum CU Littlejohn Coliseum Aug2010 01.jpg 1968; renovated 2003, 2016 James C. Littlejohn, registrar and business manager, 1908–1954 Basketball arena; capacity of 10,325. Also hosts graduation ceremonies and occasional concerts. 34°40′49.6″N 82°50′47.2″W / 34.680444°N 82.846444°W / 34.680444; -82.846444 (Littlejohn Coliseum) [75][76]
McFadden Building CU McFadden Building Aug2010.jpg 1995 Banks McFadden, Class of 1940; Clemson's first All-American, in 1939, in both football and basketball; Clemson's first entry in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1959; head basketball coach 1947–1956 34°40′47.5″N 82°50′53.6″W / 34.679861°N 82.848222°W / 34.679861; -82.848222 (McFadden Building) [77]
Memorial Stadium MemorialStadiumSept2006.jpg 1942, Enlarged: 1958, 1960, 1978, & 2003 The field is named in honor of Frank Howard, head football coach and athletic director, 1940–1969 Football stadium; capacity of 82,000; nicknamed "Death Valley" 34°40′43.4″N 82°50′35.5″W / 34.678722°N 82.843194°W / 34.678722; -82.843194 (Memorial Stadium) [78][79]
Rock Norman Track & Field Complex 2003 (indoor facility) Rock Norman, track & field coach 1940–57 34°40′25.2″N 82°51′1.1″W / 34.673667°N 82.850306°W / 34.673667; -82.850306 (Rock Norman Track & Field Complex) [80][81]
Rowing Boathouse Boathouse for the women's rowing team overlooking Lake Hartwell 34°40′38.0″N 82°51′17.6″W / 34.677222°N 82.854889°W / 34.677222; -82.854889 (Rowing Boathouse) [82]
Riggs Field Riggs Field At Clemson university.JPG 1915, renovated for soccer 1987 Walter Merritt Riggs, President of Clemson Agricultural College, 1910–24; professor of mechanical engineering and athletic coach, 1896–1909 Soccer stadium. Hosted the football team from 1915 to 1941, opened for soccer in 1987. Hosted the NCAA Men's Division I Soccer Championship finals in 1987. Capacity of 6,500. 34°40′54.5″N 82°50′19.9″W / 34.681806°N 82.838861°W / 34.681806; -82.838861 (Riggs Field) [83][84]
Sloan Tennis Center CU Sloan Tennis Center Aug2010.jpg 1985 (outdoor); 1987 (indoor) Hoke A. Sloan, local Clemson merchant and longtime volunteer tennis coach Tennis center featuring 21 outdoor courts and 4 indoor courts. 34°40′55.4″N 82°50′25.9″W / 34.682056°N 82.840528°W / 34.682056; -82.840528 (Sloan Tennis Center) [85][86]
Vickery Hall CU Vickery Hall Aug2010.jpg 1991 Kenneth N. Vickery (class of 1938), registrar and dean, 1955–1982; president of the Atlantic Coast Conference, 1976–77 Houses athletic tutoring. 34°40′38.4″N 82°50′1.9″W / 34.677333°N 82.833861°W / 34.677333; -82.833861 (Vickery Hall) [87]
Walker Golf Course 1995 John E. Walker, Sr. Home of the varsity golf team, as well as the Golf Management and Turfgrass academic programs 34°40′8.2″N 82°50′4.6″W / 34.668944°N 82.834611°W / 34.668944; -82.834611 (Walker Golf Course) [88]

Other facilities[edit]

Building Image Built Named for Notes Coordinates Ref
Bowman Field CU Tillman Hall & Bowman Field Aug2010.jpg 1900 R.T.V. Bowman, instructor and coach Bowman Field was originally used as drill, marching, and parade grounds, and the location for commencement and military commissions during the school's years as a military college. It was also the home of the football and baseball teams before the construction of Riggs Field in 1916. 34°40′51.1″N 82°50′12.0″W / 34.680861°N 82.836667°W / 34.680861; -82.836667 (Bowman Field) [13]
Calhoun Mansion Fort Hill.jpg 1803, expanded 1830 U.S. Vice-President, Senator, and Secretary of State John C. Calhoun John C. Calhoun purchased the plantation & house in 1825. It was passed to his daughter, Anna, and son-in-law Thomas Green Clemson. Clemson willed the land to the State to be used for a public university. The house was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1960. 34°40′40.6″N 82°50′20.2″W / 34.677944°N 82.838944°W / 34.677944; -82.838944 (Calhoun Mansion) [89]
Campbell Museum of Natural History CU Campbell Natural History Museum Aug2010.jpg 1894, remodeled 1936 & 1996 Bob Campbell (class of 1937), Trustee; and his wife Besty 34°40′39.6″N 82°50′5.1″W / 34.677667°N 82.834750°W / 34.677667; -82.834750 (Bob and Betsy Campbell Museum of Natural History) [90]
Carillon Garden CU Carillon Garden Aug2010.jpg 1993 Given as a gift of the Class of 1943 to honor those members killed in World War II. 34°40′45.8″N 82°50′9.4″W / 34.679389°N 82.835944°W / 34.679389; -82.835944 (Carillon Garden) [91]
Dillard Building CU Dillard Building Aug2010.jpg 1956 Frank Dillard, Superintendent of Laundry Houses the SC Institute of Energy Studies' Energy Systems Laboratory 34°40′43.9″N 82°50′25.5″W / 34.678861°N 82.840417°W / 34.678861; -82.840417 (Dillard Building) [92]
Hanover House Hanover House (Clemson).JPG 1716 The House of Hanover Built in Berkeley County, the house was moved to Clemson in the 1960s. It now serves as a museum. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 34°40′30.6″N 82°49′4.3″W / 34.675167°N 82.817861°W / 34.675167; -82.817861 (Hanover House) [93][94]
Clyde V. Madren Center & James F. Martin Inn CU Madren Center & Martin Inn Aug2010.jpg 1995 Clyde V. Madren, benefactor; and James F. Martin, class of 1964 34°39′54.7″N 82°50′35.3″W / 34.665194°N 82.843139°W / 34.665194; -82.843139 (Clyde V. Madren Center & James F. Martin Inn) [95]
Outdoor Theater Clemson amphitheatre.jpg 1940 Class of 1915 The Outdoor Theater was built as a gift of the Class of 1915, and designed by one of its members and the university's first architecture graduate, Leon LeGrand. It was built in cooperation with the Work Projects Administration. The Art Deco stage was nearly demolished and replaced in 1977, but protests prompted its renovation and the addition of concrete terraced seating.[16] It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District II (NRHP). 34°40′41.7″N 82°50′10.0″W / 34.678250°N 82.836111°W / 34.678250; -82.836111 (Outdoor Theater) [96]
President's Home CU President's Home Aug2010.jpg 1959 34°40′42.3″N 82°49′51.3″W / 34.678417°N 82.830917°W / 34.678417; -82.830917 (President's Home) [97]
President's Park CU President's Park Aug2010.jpg 1923 President's Park stretches along S.C. 93 from Sikes Hall to the President's House. A rotunda, donated by and named for the Class of 1957, was erected in 2009. 34°40′42.3″N 82°49′51.3″W / 34.678417°N 82.830917°W / 34.678417; -82.830917 (President's Home) [13][98]
Redfern Health Center CU Redfern Health Center Aug2010.jpg 1969 Alexander M. Redfern, MD, college surgeon, 1893–1920 34°40′32.3″N 82°50′0.9″W / 34.675639°N 82.833583°W / 34.675639; -82.833583 (Redfern Health Center) [99]
Sears House 1928 Sears, Roebuck and Co. Originally the W.W. Long residence. 34°40′48.7″N 82°49′36.3″W / 34.680194°N 82.826750°W / 34.680194; -82.826750 (Sears House) [100]
Sheep Barn CU Sheep Barn Aug2010 03.jpg 1915 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 34°40′36.3″N 82°49′49.4″W / 34.676750°N 82.830389°W / 34.676750; -82.830389 (Sheep Barn) [100]
Strom Thurmond Institute CU Strom Thurmond Institute Aug2010.jpg 1989 J. Strom Thurmond (class of 1923), Governor of South Carolina, 1947–51; United States Senator, 1955–2002 34°40′31.0″N 82°50′12.5″W / 34.675278°N 82.836806°W / 34.675278; -82.836806 (Strom Thurmond Institute) [101]
Trustee House CU Trustee House Aug2010.jpg c. 1894 Its use by visiting trustees The Trustee House was originally the home of Chemistry department chairman Mark B. Hardin. After his death, the Board of Trustees used it for meetings, and visiting dignitaries stayed in the house.[16] It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District II (NRHP). 34°40′42.3″N 82°50′17.1″W / 34.678417°N 82.838083°W / 34.678417; -82.838083 (Trustee House) [102]
Class of 1944 Visitors Center CU Visitors Center Aug2010.jpg 1997 Class of 1944 Named for the 1944 alumni class, most of whom served in World War II. 34°40′53.3″N 82°50′6.4″W / 34.681472°N 82.835111°W / 34.681472; -82.835111 (Class of 1944 Visitors Center) [103]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Munson & Taylor, Barre Hall
  2. ^ Munson & Taylor, Biosystems Research Complex
  3. ^ Munson & Taylor, Brackett Hall
  4. ^ Munson & Taylor, Brooks Center
  5. ^ Munson & Taylor, Cook Lab
  6. ^ Munson & Taylor, RM Cooper Library
  7. ^ Munson & Taylor, Daniel Hall
  8. ^ Munson & Taylor, Earle Hall
  9. ^ Munson & Taylor, Edwards Hall
  10. ^ Munson & Taylor, Fluor Daniel
  11. ^ Munson & Taylor, Freeman Hall
  12. ^ Munson & Taylor, Godfrey Hall
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h Davis, Martin A.; Edwards, John (31 May 1988). "Clemson University Historic District I" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. National Park Service. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 May 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  14. ^ Clemson University, Godley-Snell Research Center
  15. ^ Munson & Taylor, Godley-Snell Research Center
  16. ^ a b c d e Davis, Martin A.; Edwards, John (31 May 1988). "Clemson University Historic District II" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. National Park Service. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 May 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  17. ^ Munson & Taylor, Hardin Hall
  18. ^ Munson & Taylor, Holtzendorff Hall
  19. ^ Munson & Taylor, Hunter Chemistry Laboratory
  20. ^ Munson & Taylor, Jordan Hall
  21. ^ Munson & Taylor, Kinard Laboratory
  22. ^ Munson & Taylor, Lee Hall
  23. ^ Munson & Taylor, Lehotsky Hall
  24. ^ Munson & Taylor, Long Hall
  25. ^ Munson & Taylor, Lowry Hall
  26. ^ Munson & Taylor, Martin Hall
  27. ^ Munson & Taylor, McAdams Hall
  28. ^ Munson & Taylor, Newman Hall
  29. ^ Munson & Taylor, Olin Hall
  30. ^ Munson & Taylor, Poole Agricultural Center
  31. ^ Munson & Taylor, Rhodes Engineering Research Center
  32. ^ Munson & Taylor, Riggs Hall
  33. ^ Munson & Taylor, Sirrine Hall
  34. ^ The Tiger, Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, 12 July 1946, page 1.
  35. ^ Munson & Taylor, Tillman Hall
  36. ^ Munson & Taylor, Alumni Center
  37. ^ Munson & Taylor, Mell Hall
  38. ^ Munson & Taylor, Strode Tower
  39. ^ Munson & Taylor, Sikes Hall
  40. ^ Munson & Taylor, Barnett Hall
  41. ^ Munson & Taylor, Byrnes Hall
  42. ^ Munson & Taylor, Lever Hall
  43. ^ a b Munson & Taylor, Manning Hall
  44. ^ Munson & Taylor, Smith Hall
  45. ^ Munson & Taylor, Benet Hall
  46. ^ Munson & Taylor, Cope Hall
  47. ^ Munson & Taylor, Geer Hall
  48. ^ Munson & Taylor, Sanders Hall
  49. ^ Munson & Taylor, Young Hall
  50. ^ Munson & Taylor, Bowen Hall
  51. ^ Munson & Taylor, Bradley Hall
  52. ^ Munson & Taylor, Donaldson Hall
  53. ^ Munson & Taylor, Norris Hall
  54. ^ Munson & Taylor, Wannamaker Hall
  55. ^ Munson & Taylor, Calhoun Courts
  56. ^ a b Munson & Taylor, Lightsey Bridge
  57. ^ Munson & Taylor, Thornhill Village Apartments
  58. ^ http://www.thestate.com/news/state/south-carolina/article89708667.html
  59. ^ Munson & Taylor, Clemson House
  60. ^ Munson & Taylor, Holmes Hall
  61. ^ Munson & Taylor, Johnstone Hall
  62. ^ Munson & Taylor, McCabe Hall
  63. ^ Munson & Taylor, Stadium Residence Hall
  64. ^ http://housing.clemson.edu/initiatives/core/
  65. ^ http://housing.clemson.edu/initiatives/douthit/
  66. ^ Munson & Taylor, Edgar A. Brown University Union
  67. ^ Munson & Taylor, Harcombe Food Court
  68. ^ http://www.thetigernews.com/news/core-campus-dining-to-open-this-week/article_d359f05e-7305-11e6-bac4-5bd7aab9868f.html
  69. ^ Munson & Taylor, Hendrix Student Center
  70. ^ Munson & Taylor, Schilletter Dining Hall
  71. ^ "Doug Kingsmore Stadium". Clemson University athletics. Archived from the original on 14 March 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  72. ^ Munson & Taylor, Fike Recreation Center
  73. ^ Munson & Taylor, Jervey Athletic Center
  74. ^ "Jervey Gym". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  75. ^ Munson & Taylor, Littlejohn Coliseum
  76. ^ "Littlejohn Coliseum". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  77. ^ Munson & Taylor, McFadden Building
  78. ^ Munson & Taylor, Clemson Memorial Stadium and Frank Howard Field
  79. ^ "Memorial Stadium - Death Valley". Clemson University athletics. Archived from the original on 24 May 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  80. ^ "Rock Norman Track & Field Complex". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  81. ^ "Rock Norman". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  82. ^ "Clemson Rowing Boathouse". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  83. ^ Munson & Taylor, Riggs Field/Soccer Stadium
  84. ^ "Historic Riggs Field". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  85. ^ Munson & Taylor, Sloan Tennis Center
  86. ^ "Hoke Sloan Tennis Center". Clemson University athletics. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  87. ^ Munson & Taylor, Vickery Hall
  88. ^ "About the Walker Course". Clemson University. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  89. ^ Munson & Taylor, Calhoun Mansion
  90. ^ Munson & Taylor, Campbell Museum
  91. ^ Munson & Taylor, Carillon Garde
  92. ^ Munson & Taylor, Dillard Building
  93. ^ "Hanover House, Pickens County". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  94. ^ "The Hanover House". cityofclemson.org. Retrieved 6 June 2010. 
  95. ^ "The History Behind the Conference Center and Inn at Clemson University". Clemson University. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  96. ^ Munson & Taylor, Outdoor Theater
  97. ^ Munson & Taylor, President's Home
  98. ^ Nixon, Angela. "Clemson reunion events celebrate alumni giving". Clemson University. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  99. ^ Munson & Taylor, Redfern Health Center
  100. ^ a b Munson & Taylor, Sears House
  101. ^ Munson & Taylor, Strom Thurmond Institute
  102. ^ Munson & Taylor, Trustee House
  103. ^ Munson & Taylor, Class of 1944 Visitors Center

References[edit]

External links[edit]