Canada Games

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Canada Games
2017-7-28-DFrazee-Open Ceremonies-69 (35847556340).jpg
StatusActive
GenreSports event
FrequencyBiennial
Location(s)Various
CountryCanada
Inaugurated1967 (1967) (winter)
1969 (1969) (summer)
Organised byCanada Games Council
Websitecanadagames.ca

The Canada Games (French: Jeux du Canada) is a multi-sport event held every two years, alternating between the Canada Winter Games and the Canada Summer Games. They represent the highest level of national competition for Canadian athletes. The Games have been hosted in every province at least once since their inception in Quebec City during Canada’s Centennial in 1967.

The 2019 Canada Winter Games took place in Red Deer, Alberta, between February 15 – March 3, 2019. The Niagara 2021 Canada Sumer Games will be taking place August 6–21, 2022 in the Niagara Region. These games were postponed in 2021 because of the COVID-19 Pandemic. The PEI 2023 Canada Winter Games will be held February 18 – March 5, 2023 in the Province of Prince Edward Island. St. John's Newfoundland and Labrador has been named the Host Society of the 2025 Canada Summer Games as of April 22, 2021.

Organization[edit]

The games are governed by the Canada Games Council, a private, non-profit organization. As the Games move from one host community to the next, the Council provides the continuity, leadership and support to Host Societies in key areas such as sport technical, organizational planning, ceremonies and protocol, marketing and sponsorship. In addition, the Canada Games Council ensures effective long-term partnerships with national sport organizations, governments and the corporate sector. The Canada Games Council is a well-established, national organization that fosters on-going partnerships with organizations at the municipal, provincial and national levels.

The individual games are run by the local Host Society, a non-profit private organization that is established 2–4 years prior to the event. The Host Society functions in accordance with an agreement between the Canada Games Council, the government of Canada, the government of the province or territory and the government of the municipality. The Canada Games Council maintains and secures long-term partnership agreements with governments, corporations and national sport organizations.

Funding for the games comes from the several levels of government together with donations and corporate sponsorships. A considerable portion of the work during the games is performed by local volunteers.[1]

History[edit]

The Games were first held in 1967 in Quebec City as part of Canada's Centennial celebrations. For the first time in Canada's history, 1,800 athletes from 10 provinces and two territories gathered to compete in 15 sports. Since 1967, over 75,000 athletes have participated in the Games. Facilities built for the Games include the Saint John Canada Games Aquatic Centre (1985), the Hillside Stadium and Aquatic Centre in Kamloops, B.C. (1993), the Corner Brook Canada Games Centre and Annex (1999), and the TD Waterhouse Stadium in London, Ontario (2001).

Hosts[edit]

Year Canada Winter Games Canada Summer Games
No. Host city No. Host city
1967 1 Quebec Quebec City, Quebec
1969 2 Nova Scotia Halifax and Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
1971 3 Saskatchewan Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1973 4 British Columbia New Westminster and Burnaby, British Columbia
1975 5 Alberta Lethbridge, Alberta
1977 6 Newfoundland and Labrador St. John's, Newfoundland
1979 7 Manitoba Brandon, Manitoba
1981 8 Ontario Thunder Bay, Ontario
1983 9 Quebec Saguenay and Lac Saint-Jean, Quebec
1985 10 New Brunswick Saint John, New Brunswick
1987 11 Nova Scotia Sydney, Nova Scotia
1989 12 Saskatchewan Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1991 13 Prince Edward Island Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
1993 14 British Columbia Kamloops, British Columbia
1995 15 Alberta Grande Prairie, Alberta
1997 16 Manitoba Brandon, Manitoba
1999 17 Newfoundland and Labrador Corner Brook, Newfoundland
2001 18 Ontario London, Ontario
2003 19 New Brunswick Bathurst and Campbellton, New Brunswick
2005 20 Saskatchewan Regina, Saskatchewan
2007 21 Yukon Whitehorse, Yukon
2009 22 Prince Edward Island Summerside and Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
2011 23 Nova Scotia Halifax, Nova Scotia
2013 24 Quebec Sherbrooke, Quebec
2015 25 British Columbia Prince George, British Columbia
2017 26 Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba
2019 27 Alberta Red Deer, Alberta
2022 28 Ontario Niagara Region, Ontario[2][3]
2023 29  Prince Edward Island*
2025 30 Newfoundland and Labrador St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador[4]
2027 31  Yukon*
2029 32  New Brunswick*
2031 33 Northwest Territories, Northwest Territories*
2033 34  Nunavut*
2035 35  Saskatchewan*

* The host cities have not been chosen for the games after 2021 but the provinces through 2035 have.[5]

Sports[edit]

Summer sports[edit]

Sports for the 2021 Canada Summer Games in Niagara, ON. Box lacrosse will be making a return to the Summer Games for the first time since 1985.[6]

Winter sports[edit]

The winter games include some sports not associated with winter. Sports for the 2019 Canada Winter Games in Red Deer, Alberta.[7]

Former sports[edit]

Fencing was previously a Winter Games sport before it was moved to Summer program for the Sherbrooke 2013 games and then removed altogether following those games. BMX, field hockey, and water polo were formerly in the Summer program, as well.

All-time medal tables[edit]

All-time Canada Games medal table
Rank Province/territory  Gold   Silver Bronze Total
1  Ontario 1227 1033 972 3232
2  Quebec 1070 939 899 2908
3  British Columbia 712 765 743 2220
4  Alberta 470 539 633 1642
5  Saskatchewan 195 255 335 785
6  Manitoba 163 215 294 672
7  Nova Scotia 187 199 216 602
8  New Brunswick 69 87 157 313
9  Newfoundland and Labrador 19 42 71 132
10  Prince Edward Island 11 21 26 58
11  Yukon 15 21 19 55
12  Northwest Territories 7 6 9 22
13  Nunavut 0 0 1 1
Summer Games
Rank Province/territory  Gold   Silver Bronze Total
1  Ontario 763 576 547 1886
2  Quebec 436 483 468 1387
3  British Columbia 474 465 394 1333
4  Alberta 232 274 310 816
5  Nova Scotia 153 145 135 433
6  Saskatchewan 100 147 181 428
7  Manitoba 60 103 139 302
8  New Brunswick 33 45 59 137
9  Newfoundland and Labrador 4 19 26 49
10  Prince Edward Island 5 5 2 12
11  Yukon 2 1 3 6
12  Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
13  Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Winter Games
Rank Province/territory  Gold   Silver Bronze Total
1  Quebec 634 456 431 1521
2  Ontario 464 457 425 1346
3  British Columbia 238 300 349 887
4  Alberta 238 265 323 826
5  Manitoba 103 112 155 370
6  Saskatchewan 95 108 154 357
7  New Brunswick 36 42 98 176
8  Nova Scotia 34 54 81 169
9  Newfoundland and Labrador 15 23 45 83
10  Prince Edward Island 6 16 24 46
11  Yukon 13 20 16 49
12  Northwest Territories 7 6 9 22
13  Nunavut 0 0 1 1

Medal leaders by year[edit]

Number of occurrences

List of Canada Games[edit]

For Games medal standings see List of Canada Games.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.canadagames.ca/2019/volunteer
  2. ^ "Ontario to Host the 2021 Canada Summer Games". news.ontario.ca. Retrieved 2015-12-16.
  3. ^ "Niagara Region Named Host of the 2021 Canada Summer Games". canadagames.ca. Retrieved 2017-03-30.
  4. ^ https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/st-john-s-nl-named-host-of-the-2025-canada-summer-games-898349704.html
  5. ^ http://www.sasksport.sk.ca/pdf/sportspage/2007/Apr2.pdf
  6. ^ "SUMMER SPORTS". Canada Games Council. Retrieved 2019-08-13.
  7. ^ "SPORTS". Canada Games Council. Retrieved 2019-08-13.

External links[edit]