Canada women's national wheelchair basketball team

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Canada
Canada
IWBF Ranking 1st
IWBF zone Americas
National federation Wheelchair Basketball Canada
Coach Bill Johnson
Paralympic Games
Appearances 10
Medals Med 1.png:3 Med 2.png:0 Med 3.png:1
World Championships
Medals Med 1.png:5 Med 2.png:0 Med 3.png:2
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Light jersey
Kit shorts.png
Team colours
Light
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Dark jersey
Kit shorts.png
Team colours
Dark

The Canada women's national wheelchair basketball team is one of Canada's most successful national sporting teams. It is the only national women's wheelchair basketball team to have won three consecutive gold medals at the Paralympic Games in 1992, 1996 and 2000, and the only one to have won four consecutive World Wheelchair Basketball Championships, in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2006.[1] In 2014 it won a fifth World Championship.[2]

History[edit]

Wheelchair basketball has been played in Canada since the 1940s.[3] A women's tournament was held at the 1968 Summer Paralympics in Tel Aviv,[4] and a Canadian women's team participated in the 1972 Summer Paralympics.[5]

The women's team went on to become one of Canada's most successful national sporting teams, rivalled only by the ice hockey teams. It is the only national women's wheelchair basketball team to have won three consecutive gold medals at the Paralympic Games and the only one to have won four consecutive World Wheelchair Basketball Championships,.[1] In 2014 it won a fifth world championship at the 2014 Women's World Wheelchair Basketball Championship in Toronto.[2]

Paralympic games[edit]

Team Canada is the only team to have won three consecutive gold medals at the Summer Paralympics, in 1992, 1996 and 2000.[1]

IWBF World Championships[edit]

The first Wheelchair Basketball World Championship for women was held in 1990, and since then Team Canada has won five times, including four consecutive wins in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2006.[6] In 2014 it won a fifth World Championship before a home crowd in ]]Toronto]].[2]

  • 1990 : Bronze medal Paralympics.svg Bronze
  • 1994 : Gold medal Paralympics.svg Gold
  • 1998 : Gold medal Paralympics.svg Gold
  • 2002 : Gold medal Paralympics.svg Gold
  • 2006 : Gold medal Paralympics.svg Gold
  • 2010 : Bronze medal Paralympics.svg Bronze
  • 2014 : Gold medal Paralympics.svg Gold

Other International Tournaments[edit]

Parapan American Games[edit]

Team Canada has won three silver medals at the Parapan Am Games:[1]

  • 1986 : Silver medal Paralympics.svg Silver
  • 2007 : Silver medal Paralympics.svg Silver
  • 2011 : Silver medal Paralympics.svg Silver

Women's U25 World Wheelchair Basketball Championships[edit]

The inaugural Women's U25 World Wheelchair Basketball Championships was held from 15 to 21 July 2011 at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario.[7] The Canadian team was placed fourth, after the United States, Australia and Great Britain.[8] The team included Cindy Ouellet, Maude Jacques, Jamey Jewells and Tamara Steeves.[9]

Teams[edit]

2012 Summer Paralympic Games[edit]

Australia - Canada match, women's wheelchair basketball at Paralympics 2012, September 1. Canada (in red), left to right: Elaine Allard, Janet Mclachlan, Kendra Ohama, Cindy Ouellet, Tamara Steeves, Maude Jacques, Katie Harnock, Tracey Ferguson, Jamey Jewells, Jessica Vliegenthart, Tara Feser

Team Canada at the 2012 Summer Paralympic Games in London consisted of:[10]

Number Name Date of Birth Classification Club
4 Elaine Allard 25 February 1977 1.5 Canada Gladiateurs de Laval
5 Janet McLachlan 26 August 1977 4.5 Canada BC Breakers
6 Kendra Ohama 1 June 1965 2.5 Germany Trier Dolphins
7 Cindy Ouellet 8 December 1988 3.5 United States University of Alabama
8 Tamara Steeves 23 September 1989 1.5 Canada Brampton Cruisers
9 Maude Jacques 21 April 1992 2.5 United States University of Alabama
10 Katie Harnock 12 August 1983 2.0 United States University of Alabama
11 Elisha Williams 9 June 1978 4.5 Canada BC Breakers
12 Tracey Ferguson 7 September 1974 3.0 Canada Variety Village Club
13 Jamey Jewells 23 August 1989 1.0 Germany Trier Dolphins
14 Jessica Vliegenthart 11 August 1983 1.0 Canada BC Breakers
15 Tara Feser 2 February 1980 4.5 Canada Edmonton Inferno
  • Coach: Bill Johnson
  • Assistant Coaches : Marni Abbott-Peter, Michael Broughton
  • Additional coaches : Karla Tritten, Tim Frick, Danielle Peers
  • Physiotherapist : Sheila Forler Bauma
  • Physiologist: Mike Dahl
  • Massage Therapist: Sophie Lavardière
  • Team Doctor : Richard Goudie
  • Sport Psychologist : Adrienne Leslie-Toogood

2014 Women's World Wheelchair Basketball Championship[edit]

The gold-medal winning 2014 Women's World Wheelchair Basketball Championship team consisted of:[11]

Number Name Date of Birth Classification Club
4 Elaine Allard 25 February 1977 1.5 Canada Saint-Eustache
5 Janet McLachlan 26 August 1977 4.5 Canada Vancouver
6 Arinn Young 10 July 1996 4.5 Canada Legal
7 Cindy Ouellet 8 December1988 3.5 Canada Québec
8 Tamara Steeves 23 September 1989 1.5 Canada Mississauga
9 Maude Jacques 21 April 1992 2.5 Canada Sainte-Catherine
10 Katie Harnock 12 August 1983 2.0 Canada Elmira
11 Darda Sales 11 September 1982 4.5 Canada London (Ontario)
12 Tracey Ferguson 7 September 1974 3.0 Canada Holland Landing
13 Jamey Jewells 23 August 1989 1.0 Canada Donkin
14 Amanda Yan 22 May 1988 3.0 Canada Burnaby
15 Melanie Hawtin 20 July 1988 1.5 Canada Oakville
Alt. Corin Metzger 28 February 1992 2.5 Canada Elmira
  • Coach : Bill Johnson
  • Assistant Coaches : Michael Broughton, Michele Hynes
  • Physiotherapist : Sheila Forler Bauman
  • Team Doctor : Richard Goudie
  • Massage Therapist : Sophie Lavardière
  • Team Manager : Katie Miyazaki
  • Sports Psychologist : Adrienne Leslie-Toogood
  • Physiologist : Mike Dahl
  • Strength coach : Kyle Turcotte

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Team Canada - Women's National Team". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 10 August 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c "Schedule & Results - 2014 WWWBC". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 10 August 2014. 
  3. ^ "A Canadian Perspective". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 10 August 2014. 
  4. ^ Labanowich & Thiboutout 2011, p. 293.
  5. ^ Labanowich & Thiboutout 2011, p. 297.
  6. ^ "Past World Championship Results". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 4 August 2014. 
  7. ^ "Event Overview". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 4 August 2014. 
  8. ^ "Women U25 National Team". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 4 August 2014. 
  9. ^ "Women's U25 Roster". Retrieved 4 August 2014. 
  10. ^ "2012 Women's Roster". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 10 August 2014. 
  11. ^ "Team Canada Women's Roster". Wheelchair Basketball Canada. Retrieved 10 August 2014. 

References[edit]

  • Labanowich, Stan; Thiboutout, Armand (2011). Wheelchairs Can Jump!: A History of Wheelchair Basketball. Boston: Acanthus Publishing. ISBN 9780984217397. OCLC 792945375. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Strohkendl, Horst (1996). The 50th Anniversary of Wheelchair Basketball. A History. New York: Waxmann Verlag. ISBN 9783893254415. 

External links[edit]