Canadian Authors Association

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The Canadian Authors Association is Canada's oldest association for writers and authors.[1] The organization has published several periodicals, organized local chapters and events for Canadian writers, and sponsors writing awards, including the Governor General's Awards.

History[edit]

The Canadian Authors Association was founded in 1921. The founding organizers included John Murray Gibbon, Bernard Keble Sandwell, Stephen Leacock, and Pelham Edgar.[2] By the end of its first year the organization had more than 700 members.[3]

In its early years the association was known for its conservative views on literature and its support of traditional writing genres,[4] including colourful idealized stories in quaint local settings.[5] Local chapters of the CAA organized activities to encourage and develop the skills of Canadian writers, including study groups, readings, and workshops.[6]

In 1919, the CAA founded a magazine, Canadian Bookman.[7][8] In 1936, the association founded Canadian Poetry, edited by E. J. Pratt.[9]

The association founded the Governor General's Awards in 1937, Canada's highest literary award, as well as the Canadian Authors Association Awards.[1]

Awards[edit]

The Canadian Authors Association Awards (CAAA) are presented in several categories to authors who are Canadian born or permanent residents.[1]

CAA Award for fiction (annually announced in June)[10]
CAA The Lela Common Award for Canadian History
CAA Award for Poetry
CAA Award for emerging writer
CAA Canadian Authors Fred Kerner Award
  • 2017 Margo Wheaton (Halifax) for The unlit path behind the house[13]
  • 2016 Caroline Vu for Palawan story

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c John Lennox (December 16, 2013). "Canadian Authors Association". Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  2. ^ Harrington, Lyn (1981). Syllables of Recorded Time: The Story of the Canadian Authors Association, 1921-1981. Dundurn. pp. 21–22. ISBN 978-0-88924-112-1. Retrieved 2014-07-10.
  3. ^ "Some Canadian authors", The Glengarry News, November 25, 1921. from the Glengarry Archives website
  4. ^ Reingard M. Nischik (2008). History of Literature in Canada: English-Canadian and French-Canadian. Camden House. pp. 154–155. ISBN 978-1-57113-359-5.
  5. ^ "The Modern-Realistic Movement in English-Canadian Literature". page 6. Colin Hill, Department of English McGill University, Montreal, Apr 8, 2003
  6. ^ W.G. Fleming (15 December 1972). Educational Contributions of Associations: Ontario's Educative Society. University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division. pp. 251–252. ISBN 978-1-4875-9706-1.
  7. ^ William H. New (2002). Encyclopedia of Literature in Canada. University of Toronto Press. p. 566. ISBN 978-0-8020-0761-2. Retrieved 22 April 2016.
  8. ^ W.H. New; William Herbert New (6 August 2003). A History of Canadian Literature. McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-7735-2597-9.
  9. ^ "Men of the Cloth and the Book: E.J. Pratt and Lorne Pierce". by Cheryl Cundell, Queen's University
  10. ^ Years before cf. The Europa Directory of Literary Awards and Prizes, Europa Publ., Routlege, 2015 ISBN 1857431464
  11. ^ CAA winners 2016
  12. ^ CAA winners 2015
  13. ^ Wheaton at Writers' Federation of Nova Scotia