Canadian Library Association Book of the Year for Children Award

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The Canadian Library Association Book of the Year for Children Award is a literary award that annually recognizes one Canadian children's book. The book must be written in English and published in Canada during the preceding year (and nominated by the end of November). The writer must be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada.[1]

The Book of the Year for Children Award is administered and presented by the Canadian Library Association/Association canadienne des bibliothèques (CLA).[1] It was inaugurated in 1947 by an award to Roderick Haig-Brown for Starbuck Valley Winter[a] and it has been presented to one book every year without exception from 1963.[2]

The companion CLA Young Adult Book Award has been presented annually from 1981.[3] As of 2016, two Book of the Year for Children criteria are "appeal to children up to and including age 12" and "creative (i.e., original) writing (i.e., fiction, poetry, narrative, non-fiction, retelling of traditional literature)".[1] Corresponding criteria for the YA Book Award are "[appeal] to young adults between the ages of 13 and 18" and "fiction (novel, collection of short stories, or graphic novel)".[3] Two books have won both the children's and young-adult awards (below).

Winners[edit]

There were two awards in 1966 and no award six times from 1948 to 1962.[2] From 1967, the award-winning books were published during the preceding year; to 1965, most of the winning books were published during the second preceding year; the 1966 winners were published one each in 1964 and 1965.


Repeat winners[edit]

Many of Canada's most beloved authors have won this award multiple times:

Winners of multiple awards[edit]

Two books have won the CLA Young Adult Book Award as well as the Book of the Year for Children: Shadow in Hawthorn Bay by Janet Lunn, in 1987, and Half Brother by Kenneth Oppel, in 2011.[2][4]

Nine books named CLA Book of the Year for Children have also won the Governor General's Award for English-language children's literature, or the preceding Canada Council Children's Literature Prize, or earlier Governor General's Award for juvenile fiction (in all, conferred for English-language books from 1949 to 1958 and 1975 to present). The writers and CLA award dates were Richard S. Lambert 1950, Farley Mowat 1958, Kevin Major 1979, Cora Taylor 1986, Janet Lunn 1987, Michael Bedard 1991, Tim Wynne-Jones 1994, Pamela Porter 2006, Susin Nielsen 2013.[5][6]

Thus Shadow in Hawthorn Bay (Lester & Orpen Dennys, 1986) by Janet Lunn won three major Canadian awards, the CLA awards for both children's and young-adult literature and the Governor General's Award in its last year as the Canada Council Children's Literature Prize.[5]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The inaugural, 1947 award-winning book was Starbuck Valley Winter by Roderick Haig-Brown, illustrated by Charles De Feo. It had been published during 1943 in the U.S. (New York: William Morrow, OCLC 2883591); 1944 in the U.K. (London: William Collins, OCLC 9415906). A "Victory Edition" was published 1946 in Canada (Toronto: Collins, OCLC 630077).
  2. ^ Glooskap's Country (Oxford University Press, 1955 or 1956) was a posthumous reissue of stories collected by the folklorist Macmillan and published in Canadian Wonder Tales (1918) or Canadian Fairy Tales (1922). OCLC 756287533. Retrieved 2015-07-24.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Book of the Year for Children Award". Book Awards. Canadian Library Association. Archived from the original on 2014-07-21. Retrieved 2014-07-15. 
  2. ^ a b c "Book of the Year for Children Award". Book Awards. CLA. Archived from the original on 2015-07-22. Retrieved 2015-07-21. 
  3. ^ a b "CLA Young Adult Book Award". Book Awards. CLA. Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2015-08-03. 
  4. ^ "Young Adult Book Award". Book Awards. CLA. Archived from the original on 2015-09-08. Retrieved 2015-08-03. 
  5. ^ a b "Canada Council Children's Literature Awards" [English-language books].
      "Canada Council Children's Literature in French Awards".
    online guide to writing in canada (track0.com/ogwc). Retrieved 2015-08-06.
  6. ^ "Governor General's Literary Awards" [winners, 1936–1999]. online guide to writing in canada. Retrieved 2015-08-22.

External links[edit]