1980 Canadian federal election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is an old revision of this page, as edited by Arctic.gnome (talk | contribs) at 15:11, 1 September 2006 (parliament link). The present address (URL) is a permanent link to this revision, which may differ significantly from the current revision.

Jump to navigation Jump to search
The House of Commons after the 1980 election
Popular vote map showing seat totals by province

The Canadian federal election of 1980 was held on February 18, 1980 to elect members of the 32nd Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. It was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Joe Clark was defeated on a motion of no confidence in the Commons.

Clark and his government had been under attack for its perceived inexperience, for example, in its handling of its 1979 election campaign commitment to move Canada's embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Clark had maintained uneasy relations with the fourth largest party in the House of Commons, Social Credit. While he needed the six votes that the conservative-populist Quebec-based party had in order to get legislation passed, he was unwilling to agree to the conditions they imposed for their support. Clark had managed to recruit one Social Credit MP, Richard Janelle, to join the PC caucus.

Clark's Minister of Finance, John Crosbie, introduced an austere government budget in late 1979 that proposed to increase the excise tax on gasoline by 18 cents per Imperial gallon to reduce the federal government's deficit. The five remaining Social Credit MPs demanded that the revenues raised be allocated to Quebec, and decided to abstain from a vote of non-confidence introduced by Bob Rae of the New Democratic Party. In addition, several Conservative MPs were either stuck abroad or too ill to attend the crucial vote, while the Liberals had assembled their entire caucus, even going as far as to bring in several bedridden MPs by ambulance. This resulted in the defeat of the government in the House of Commons, and forced a new election to be called.

Clark's Tories campaigned under the slogan, "Real change deserves a fair chance", but the voters were unwilling to give Clark another chance. The loss of the budget vote just seven months into his mandate and his subsequent defeat in the February 18 general election would eventually cost him the leadership of the Progressive Conservatives.

Former Liberal prime minister Pierre Trudeau had announced his resignation as leader of the Liberal Party following its defeat in 1979. However, no leadership convention had been held when the Progressive Conservative government fell. Trudeau quickly rescinded his resignation to lead the party to victory, winning 34 more seats than in the 1979 federal election. This enabled the Liberals to form a majority government that would last until its defeat in the 1984 election.

The abstention by Social Credit on the crucial budget vote (while the Liberals and NDP voted to bring down the government) contributed to the growing perception that the party had become irrelevant following the death of iconic leader Réal Caouette. The Social Credit Party lost its last five seats in the House of Commons, and rapidly declined into obscurity after this election.

National results

Despite winning at least one seat in every province and territory, the Progressive Conservatives lost to the Liberals, who won a majority government. This was mainly because the Liberals won all but one seat in their stronghold of Quebec, and captured the majority of the seats in Ontario, Canada's two most populous provinces. Progressive Conservative Premier Bill Davis's criticism of the gas tax was brought up by the Trudeau's Liberals and that sapped federal PC support in Ontario. The Liberals were shut out west of Manitoba, highlighted a sharp geographical divide in the country.

Party Party leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular vote
1979 Dissolution Elected % Change # % Change
     Liberal Pierre Trudeau 282 114 114 147 +28.9% 4,855,425 44.34% +4.23%
     Progressive Conservative Joe Clark 282 136 136 103 -24.3% 3,552,994 32.45% -3.44%
     New Democratic Party Ed Broadbent 280 26 27 32 +23.1% 2,165,087 19.77% +1.89%
     Social Credit Fabien Roy 81 6 5 - -100% 185,486 1.70% -2.91%

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Rhino/row

Rhinoceros Cornelius I 121 - - -   110,597 1.01% +0.46%

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Marxist-Leninist/row

Marxist-Leninist Hardial Bains 177 - - - - 14,728 0.13% +0.01%

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Libertarian/row

Libertarian   58 - - - - 14,656 0.13% -0.01%

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/BQ/row

Union Populaire   54 - - - - 14,474 0.13% -0.04%
     Independent 55 - - - - 14,472 0.13% -0.13%
     Unknown 41 - - - - 12,532 0.11% -0.07%

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Communist/row

Communist William Kashtan 52 - - - - 6,022 0.05% -0.02%
     No affiliation 14 - - - - 3,063 0.03% +0.03%
Total 1,497 282 282 282 - 10,934,475 100%  

Sources: http://www.elections.ca,History of Federal Ridings since 1867

Notes:

"% change" refers to change from previous election.

Changes to party standings from previous election: Social Credit MP Richard Janelle cross the floor to join the PC Party. PC MP John Diefenbaker died during the parliamentary session. A New Democrat was elected in the subsequent by-election.

Results by province

Party name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL NT YK Total
     Liberal Seats: - - - 2 52 74 7 5 2 5 - - 147
     Popular Vote: 22.2 22.2 24.2 28.0 41.9 68.2 50.1 39.9 46.8 47.0 35.8 39.6 44.3
     Progressive Conservative Seats: 16 21 7 5 38 1 3 6 2 2 1 1 103
     Vote: 41.5 64.9 38.9 37.7 35.5 12.6 32.5 38.7 46.3 36.0 24.7 40.6 32.4
     New Democratic Party Seats: 12 - 7 7 5 - - - - - 1 - 32
     Vote: 35.3 10.3 36.3 33.5 21.8 9.1 16.2 20.9 6.6 16.7 38.4 19.8 19.8
Total seats: 28 21 14 14 95 75 10 11 4 7 2 1 282
Parties that won no seats:
     Social Credit Vote: 0.1 1.0 xx   xx 5.9             1.7

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Rhino/row

Rhinoceros Vote: 0.4 0.7 0.1 0.4 0.2 3.0 0.5 0.2     1.1   1.0

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Marxist-Leninist/row

Marxist-Leninist Vote: 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2 xx xx xx 0.1     0.1

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Libertarian/row

Libertarian Vote:     xx   0.3 0.1 xx           0.1

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/BQ/row

Union Populaire Vote:           0.5             0.1
     Independent Vote: 0.3 0.3 0.1 xx 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.3 0.1     0.1
     Unknown Vote: xx 0.5 0.2 0.1 xx 0.2 0.3     0.1     0.1

Template:Canadian politics/party colours/Communist/row

Communist Vote: 0.1 0.1 xx 0.1 0.1 xx             0.1
     No affiliation Vote:         xx 0.1 0.1           xx

xx - less than 0.05% of the popular vote.

Notes

External links


Preceded by
1979 federal election
Canadian federal elections Succeeded by
1984 federal election