Canadian federal election results in Newfoundland and Labrador

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Electoral history
2015
2011
2008
2006
2004
2000
1997
1993
1988
1984
1980
1979
1974
1974
1972
1968

Canadian federal elections have provided the following results in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Regional profile[edit]

Newfoundland and Labrador has been a Liberal heartland since it joined Canada in 1949, with only the city of St. John's electing Progressive Conservatives on a relatively consistent basis in the past, though that support shifted to the NDP and Liberal parties in 2006 and to the NDP in the 2008 elections. Even in the 1984 Mulroney landslide, more rural and remote seats went Liberal than PC. The Conservatives picked up one seat in the 2006 election, but the Liberals still hold a majority of the seats. Party preference here has a lot to do with religion, where Catholics tend to vote Conservative and Protestants Liberal (contrary to the rest of the country). In 2008, the Anything But Conservative movement took hold here and the Conservatives lost all their seats to the Liberals and NDP. In the 2011 election, Newfoundland and Labrador was the only province to have the Liberals win in terms of popular vote. They however did lose 2 seats, 1 to the Tories and one to the NDP. In the 2015 election, Newfoundland and Labrador's Liberal slant was taken to a new level, with Justin Trudeau's Liberals capturing every seat in the province (as well as all other Atlantic provinces), most by landslide majorities. In Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, they received 81.78% of the vote – the highest share obtained by any party in any riding in 2015.

2015 - 42nd General Election[edit]

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Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Conservative   NDP   Liberal   Green   Other
Avalon Lorraine E. Barnett
4,670
11.10%
Jeannie Baldwin
6,075
14.43%
Ken McDonald
23,528
55.90%
Krista Byrne-Puumala
228
0.54%
Scott Andrews
(NA)
7,501
17.82%
Jennifer McCreath
(SD)
84
0.20%
Scott Andrews
Bonavista—Burin—
Trinity
Mike Windsor
3,534
10.07%
Jenn Brown
2,557
7.29%
Judy M. Foote
28,704
81.80%
Tyler John Colbourne
297
0.85%
Judy Foote
Random—Burin—St. George's
Coast of Bays—Central—
Notre Dame
Kevin George O'Brien
6,479
18.28%
Claudette Menchenton
2,175
6.14%
Scott Simms
26,523
74.82%
Elizabeth Perry
271
0.76%
Scott Simms
Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor
Labrador Peter Penashue
1,716
13.87%
Edward Rudkowski
1,779
14.38%
Yvonne Jones
8,878
71.75%
no candidate[note 1] Yvonne Jones
Long Range Mountains Wayne Ruth
5,085
12.16%
Devon Babstock
4,739
11.33%
Gudie Hutchings
30,889
73.85%
Terry Cormier
1,111
2.66%
Gerry Byrne
Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte
St. John's East Deanne Stapleton
2,938
6.55%
Jack Harris
20,328
45.29%
Nick Whalen
20,974
46.73%
David Anthony Peters
500
1.11%
Sean Burton (Comm.)
140
0.31%
Jack Harris
St. John's South—
Mount Pearl
Marek Krol
2,047
4.57%
Ryan Cleary
16,467
36.76%
Seamus O'Regan
25,922
57.86%
Jackson McLean
365
0.81%
Ryan Cleary

2011 - 41st General Election[edit]

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Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Conservative   Liberal   NDP   Green   Other
Avalon Fabian Manning

14,839
40.63%

Scott Andrews

16,021
43.86%

Matthew Martin Fuchs

5,172
14.16%

Matt Crowder

217
0.59%

Randy Wayne Dawe (Ind.)

277
0.76%

Scott Andrews
Bonavista—Gander—
Grand Falls—Windsor
Aaron Hynes

8,511
27.49%

Scott Simms

17,895
57.80%

Clyde Bridger

4,277
13.82%

Robyn Kenny

276
0.89%

Scott Simms
Humber—St. Barbe—
Baie Verte
Trevor Taylor

7,519
25.09%

Gerry Byrne

17,119
57.11%

Shelley Senior

4,751
15.85%

Robin Blair Gosse

253
0.84%

Wayne R. Bennett (Ind.)

332
1.11%

Gerry Byrne
Labrador Peter Penashue

4,234
40.43%

Todd Russell

4,003
38.23%

Jacob Larkin

2,099
20.04%

George C.R. Barrett

136
1.30%

Todd Russell
Random—Burin—
St. George's
John Ottenheimer

8,322
32.00%

Judy Foote

12,914
49.65%

Stella Magalios

4,466
17.17%

Tanya Gutmanis

306
1.18%

Judy Foote
St. John's East Jerry Byrne

9,199
20.87%

John Allan

3,019
6.85%

Jack Harris

31,392
71.22%

Robert Miller

467
1.06%

Jack Harris
St. John's South—
Mount Pearl
Loyola Sullivan

8,863
22.81%

Siobhán Coady

11,131
28.65%

Ryan Cleary

18,573
47.80%

Rick Austin

291
0.66%

Siobhán Coady

2008 - 40th General Election[edit]

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Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Conservative   Liberal   NDP   Green   Other
Avalon Fabian Manning

11,542
35.16%

Scott Andrews

14,866
45.28%

Randy Dawe

5,708
17.39%

David Aylward

713
2.17%

  Fabian Manning
Bonavista—
Gander—
Grand Falls—
Windsor
Andrew House

4,354
15.23%

Scott Simms

20,089
70.27%

Jason Holley

3,577
12.51%

Robert O'Connor

568
1.99%

  Scott Simms
Humber—
St. Barbe—
Baie Verte
Lorne Robinson

2,806
10.62%

Gerry Byrne

17,943
67.92%

Mark Kennedy

4,703
17.80%

Wayne Ronald Bennett (NLFP)

967 3.66%

Gerry Byrne
Labrador Lacey Lewis

615
7.97%

Todd Russell

5,426
70.28%

Phyllis Artiss

1,378
17.85%

Nyssa McLeod

302
3.91%

  Todd Russell
Random—
Burin—
St. George's
Herb Davis

4,791
20.51%

Judy Foote

12,557
53.74%

Terry White

5,553
23.77%

Kaitlin Wainwright

462
1.98%

  Bill Matthews
St. John's East Craig Westcott

3,872
9.21%

Walter Noel

5,273
12.54%

Jack Harris

31,369
74.63%

Howard Storey

586
1.39%

Shannon Tobin (PC) 584 1.39%
Les Coultas (NLFP) 349 0.83%
Norman Doyle
St. John's South—
Mount Pearl
Merv Wiseman

4,324
12.55%

Siobhán Coady

14,930
43.35%

Ryan Cleary

13,883
40.31%

Ted Warren

643
1.87%

Greg Byrne (NLFP) 485 1.41%
Terry Butler (IND) 179 0.52%
Loyola Hearn

2006 - 39th General Election[edit]

The Liberals won four seats and the Conservatives three. The open Avalon seat changed hands from the Liberals to the Tories. The seat had been held by Natural Resources Minister John Efford, who had retired. Otherwise, there was little change from the previous election. edit

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   Conservative   NDP   Green   Other
Avalon Bill Morrow

14,318

Fabian Manning

19,132

Eugene Conway

3 365

Shannon Hillier

297 0.8%

  John Efford
Bonavista—Gander—
Grand Falls—Windsor
Scott Simms

19,866

Aaron Hynes

15,376

Sandra Cooze

2,668

Judy Davis

265 0.7%

  Scott Simms
Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte Gerry Byrne

17,208

Cyril Pelley

10,137

Holly Pike

4,847

Martin Hanzalek

339 1.0%

  Gerry Byrne
Labrador Todd Russell

5,768

Joseph Goudie

4,528

Jake Larkin

1,037

Gail Zwicker

82 0.7%

  Todd Russell [1]
Random—Burin—St. George's Bill Matthews

13,652

Cynthia Downey

12,232

Amanda Will

3,702

Mark A. Brennan

426 1.4%

  Bill Matthews
St. John's East Paul Antle

14,345

Norman Doyle

19,110

Michael Kehoe

7,190

Stephen Eli Harris

402 1.0%

  Norman Doyle
St. John's South—Mount Pearl Siobhan Coady

12,295

Loyola Hearn

16,644

Peg Norman

8,073

Barry Crozier

235 0.6%

  Loyola Hearn
  1. ^ Russell won seat in byelection held May 24, 2005. Previously held by Liberal Lawrence O'Brien (died December 16, 2004)

2004 - 38th General Election[edit]

One of the biggest questions of the 2004 election was whether the new Conservative Party of Canada could match the old federal PC Party's level of support in Atlantic Canada. With Newfoundland and Labrador's provincial PC government unpopular over mandating an end to the previous year's public service strike, any province-wide success for 2004 was seen as unlikely. The Conservatives lost one of their three seats (previously gained in a byelection) and held their rump in St. John's. Des McGrath was seen as the NDP's best chance of electing a candidate in the province in several decades, but he still fell nearly 4000 votes short of winning Random—Burin—St. George's. edit

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   Conservative   NDP   Green   Other
Avalon John Efford
18,335
Rick Dalton
9,211
Michael Kehoe
3,450
Don Ferguson
430
  John Efford [2]
Bonavista—Exploits Scott Simms
15,970
Rex Barnes
13,786
Samuel McLean
2,667
Ed Sailor White
367
John Lannon (Ind.)
344
Rex Barnes [3]
Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte Gerry Byrne
17,820
Wynanne Downer
6,538
Holly Pike
3,743
Steve Durant
384
  Gerry Byrne
Labrador Lawrence O'Brien
5,524
Merrill Strachan
1,400
Shawn Crann
856
Lori-Ann Martino
178
Ern Condon (Ind.)
919
Lawrence O'Brien
Random—Burin—St. George's Bill Matthews
12,383
Larry Peckford
4,820
Desmond McGrath
8,797
Justin Dollimont
474
  Bill Matthews
St. John's North Walter Noel
13,343
Norman Doyle
15,073
Janine Piller
7,198
Scott Vokey
791
  Norman Doyle
St. John's South Siobhan Coady
11,879
Loyola Hearn
13,330
Peg Norman
7,989
Steve Willcott
493
  Loyola Hearn
  1. ^ Efford won seat in 2002 byelection; originally held by Liberal Brian Tobin
  2. ^ Barnes won seat in 2002 byelection; originally held by Liberal George Baker
Key map
  1. Avalon
  2. Bonavista-Exploits
  3. Humber-St. Barbe-Baie Verte
  4. Labrador
  5. Random-Burin-St. George's
  6. St. John's North
  7. St. John's South
Conservative Party of Canada
Green Party of Canada
Liberal Party of Canada
New Democratic Party

2000 - 37th General Election[edit]

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Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   Canadian Alliance   NDP   PC   Other
Bonavista—Trinity—Conception Brian Tobin
22,096
Randy Wayne Dawe
1,051
Fraser March
6,473
Jim Morgan
11,009
  Fred Mifflin
Burin—St. George's Bill Matthews
14,603
Peter Fenwick
1,511
David Sullivan
924
Fred Pottle
5,798
Sam Synard (Ind.)
7,891
Bill Matthews[a]
Gander—Grand Falls George Baker
15,874
Orville Penney
1,912
Bill Broderick
2,876
Roger Pike
8,191
  George Baker
Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte Gerry Byrne
15,405
Murdock Cole
1,702
Trevor Taylor
8,297
Peter McBreairty
6,340
  Gerry Byrne
Labrador Lawrence O'Brien
7,153
Eugene Burt
677
Amanda Will
1,284
Hayward Broomfield
1,254
  Lawrence O'Brien
St. John's East Peter Miller
13,835
Garry Hartle
1,144
Carol Cantwell
5,395
Norman Doyle
23,606
Judy Day (Ind.)
254
Michael Rayment (NLP)
122
Norman Doyle
St. John's West Chuck Furey
14,137
Eldon Drost
840
Dave Curtis
4,744
Loyola Hearn
22,959
Michael Rendell (NLP)
141
Loyola Hearn
  1. ^ Matthews defected from PC Party in August 1999

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mary Lou Harley was announced on her party's website as the Green Party candidate for Labrador but did not register with Elections Canada.

References[edit]