Candy Clark

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Candy Clark
Candy-clark-trailer.jpg
Candy Clark in trailer to The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)
Born Candace June Clark
(1947-06-20) June 20, 1947 (age 68)
Norman, Oklahoma U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 1972–present
Spouse(s) Marjoe Gortner (1978–1979) (divorced)
Jeff Wald (1987–1988) (divorced)

Candace June "Candy" Clark (born June 20, 1947) is an American film and television actress, well known for her role as Debbie Dunham in the film American Graffiti (1973), which garnered her an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress category nomination. She reprised the role in for the sequel More American Graffiti (1979).

Early life[edit]

Born in Norman, Oklahoma, to Ella (née Padberg) and Thomas Clark, a chef, she grew up in Fort Worth, Texas. She attended Green B. Trimble Technical High School.[1][2] Clark was a fashion model in New York where she moved at age 18. [3]

Career[edit]

Clark's first acting role was the character of Faye in John Huston's film, Fat City, in 1972. Clark stared or acted in such films as: The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976), The Big Sleep (1978), Blue Thunder (1983), Amityville 3-D (1983), Cat's Eye (1985) and At Close Range (1986). Clark played the role of Francine Hewitt in The Blob (1988).

Clark appears in the 2009 film The Informant! as the mother of Mark Whitacre, played by Matt Damon. In 2011, Clark went to Berlin to work on the play Images of Louise Brooks directed by Sven Mundt.

She has also made guest appearances on television series including Dating Game, Magnum, P.I., Banacek, Simon & Simon, Matlock, Baywatch Nights and Criminal Minds.

Personal life[edit]

She dated Jeff Bridges, for several years whom she met on the set of Fat City in 1972. [4] She was married to Marjoe Gortner from 1978 to 1979. She married Jeff Wald in 1987, and divorced him in 1988. As of 2007, she attended many hot rod shows, and enjoys gardening, collecting antiques, and trading memorabilia on eBay.[4]

Filmography[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Candy Clark Tech Revolution" – Fort Worth Weekly
  2. ^ Candy Clark Biography (1947-)
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b Edward Guthmann (2007-08-23). "The ride of her life". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2007-08-23. 

External links[edit]