Candy Moore

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Candy Moore
Lucille Ball Vivian Vance The Lucy Show 1962.JPG
Cast of The Lucy Show during its first three seasons: Candy Moore (in back); front, L-R: Jimmy Garrett, Lucille Ball, Vivian Vance, and Ralph Hart (1962)
Born (1947-08-26) August 26, 1947 (age 75)
EducationUCLA
OccupationActress
Years active1959–1967, 1980–1981
Spouse
(m. 1971; div. 1978)
Children1

Candy Moore (born August 26, 1947) is an American actress from Maplewood, New Jersey.[1] Moore attended UCLA School of Theatre Arts. Moore began her career appearing on television series such as Leave It to Beaver[2] and Letter to Loretta. In 1962, she was cast as Lucille Ball's daughter Chris Carmichael on The Lucy Show. Moore remained a regular on The Lucy Show through the end of the 1964–1965 season after which the premise of the show was retooled and most of the supporting cast was written out. Moore also appeared nine times on The Donna Reed Show,[2] five of which as Angie Quinn, the girlfriend of series character Jeff Stone (Paul Petersen).

Career[edit]

In 1959-1960, she appeared in two episodes of the second season of One Step Beyond, as Carolyn Peters in "Forked Lightning" (ep. 9), and as Callie Wylie in "Goodbye Grandpa" (ep. 38).

In 1961, she played Margie Manners, the kitchen seductress of Wally Cleaver, in the Leave It To Beaver episode "Mother's Helper" (S4:E23). That same year she also acted in one episode each of The Loretta Young Show and Wagon Train.

In 1961–1962, she portrayed Gillian Favor in two episodes of Rawhide. She also appeared in the first season of My Three Sons as a hiker in the 1961 episode "Fire Watch" (ep. 36).

Moore also starred in a television pilot titled Time Out for Ginger, which aired on CBS on September 18, 1962. However, it didn't sell.[3]

Moore has also appeared in films such as Raging Bull, The Night of the Grizzly, Tomboy and the Champ, and Lunch Wagon.[2]

Candy Moore, the model and actress who appeared in the 1981 television series Lunch Wagon, is often confused with an actress of the same name who starred in The Lucy Show and married actor Paul Gleason. The case of incorrect identity is pervasive throughout the Internet, having the Lucy Show actress often linked to, and credited with, the work of the model found on the Cars' album. The Candy Moore from the cover of the Candy-O album can also be found wearing a red shirt on the cover of Rick James' album Street Songs, and on subsequent sleeves for his singles such as "Ghetto Life". Other shots of the model during the Candy-O cover shoot, can be found in a video interview with David Robinson.[4][5]

Up to 2019, she taught English at the East Los Angeles Performing Arts Academy Magnet at Esteban E. Torres High School.[6][7]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes Ref(s)
1961 Tomboy and the Champ Tommy Jo
1966 The Night of the Grizzly Meg
1980 Raging Bull Linda
1981 Lunch Wagon Diedre

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes Ref(s)
1959–60 Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond Callie Wylie / Carolyn Peters 2 Episodes, including: 'Forked Lightening ', (Nov. 17th, '59).
1961 Leave It to Beaver Margie Manners Episode: "Mother's Helper"
The Loretta Young Show Love Episode: "The Forbidden Guests"
Wagon Train Sue Ellison Episode: "Wagon to Fort Anderson
My Three Sons Shirley Episode: "Fire Watch"
Shannon Donna Humphrey Episode: "The Embezzler's Daughter"
1961–62 Rawhide Gillian Favor 2 Episodes
1961–66 The Donna Reed Show Angie / Bernice / Bebe / Bebe Barnes 10 episodes
1962 Bachelor Father Phyllis Hartzell Episode: "Bentley Goes to Bat"
The Comedy Spot Ginger Carol Episode: "Time Out for Ginger"
1962–65 The Lucy Show Chris Carmichael 39 episodes
1967 Dream Girl of '67 Herself Fashion hostess; 5 episodes

References[edit]

  1. ^ Leonard, Vince. "A 'Little Lucy'... Kind Of", The Pittsburgh Press, November 29, 1964. Accessed April 2, 2021. "Candy lives with her parents in North Hollywood. Born in Maplewood, N. J., Aug. 26, 1947, Candy started modeling in New York when she was 5. At 7, she was already doing television commercials."
  2. ^ a b c The New York Times
  3. ^ "TV Pilot: Time Out for Ginger".
  4. ^ "Candy-O", Wikipedia, August 11, 2022, retrieved August 21, 2022
  5. ^ The Cars Candy-O Expanded Edition – Interview with David Robinson about cover artwork, retrieved August 21, 2022
  6. ^ "Candy Moore". everything lucy. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
  7. ^ "English". East Los Angeles Performing Arts Magnet. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved June 21, 2021.

External links[edit]