Canopy (building)

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A canopied tower at St Martin's Church, Memmingen
A canopy from Kraków, Poland.

A canopy is an overhead roof or else a structure over which a fabric or metal covering is attached, able to provide shade or shelter from weather conditions such as sun, hail, snow and rain.[1] A canopy can also be a tent, generally without a floor. The word comes from the Ancient Greek κωνώπειον (konópeion, "cover to keep insects off"), from κώνωψ (kónops, "cone-face"), which is a bahuvrihi compound meaning "mosquito". The first 'o' changing into 'a' may be due to influence from the place name Canopus, Egypt thought of as a place of luxuries.

Architectural canopies include projections giving protection from the weather, or merely decoration.[2] Such canopies are supported by the building to which they are attached and often also by a ground mounting provided by not less than two stanchions, or upright support posts.

Canopies can also stand alone, such as a fabric covered gazebo or cabana. Fabric canopies can meet various design needs. Many modern fabrics are long-lasting, bright, easily cleaned, strong and flame-retardant. This material can be vinyl, acrylic, polyester or canvas.[3] Modern frame materials offer high strength-to-weight ratios and corrosion resistance. The proper combination of these properties can result in safe, strong, economical and attractive products.

Classification numbers[edit]

Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Division 10 MasterFormat 2004 Edition:

  • 10 73 16 - Canopies
  • 10 73 00 - Protective Covers

CSI MasterFormat 1995 Edition:

  • 10530 - Canopies

References[edit]

  1. ^ "3 Ways Metal Canopies Enhance Your Brand's Image" American Prefabricated Structures, Retrieved July 14, 2016.
  2. ^ Sabit Adanur (1995). Wellington Sears Handbook of Industrial Textiles. CRC Press. p. 216. 
  3. ^ "Awning Fabrics Comparison: What's Right For You?" Herculite, Retrieved July 14, 2016.

See also[edit]